6

Liz Cheney has lost her primary race to be re-nominated for her seat as Wyoming’s representative in the House. Harriet Hageman, a pro-Trump candidate, will be the Republican nominee in November.

All news coverage has made it seem like Cheney will definitely be leaving Congress when her current term is over, for example today’s Washington Post headline is “Cheney says she is considering a White House run after drubbing in Wyo. primary”.

Why isn’t Cheney planning to keep her seat by running as an independent? Does Wyoming law prevent her from doing so, or does she simply think it would be futile?

13
  • It could be she is going to run as a way to impact the presidential race and I have seen a few articles suggesting that
    – Joe W
    Aug 17 at 21:19
  • She lost by a 35-point margin, as I understand. Somewhat similar to the +43 margin Trump had in the state, IIRC
    – Fizz
    Aug 17 at 21:30
  • Yes. But who is going to vote for her, as she is no longer the darling of the crossover voters (Dems voted for her at GOP's primary).
    – r13
    Aug 17 at 21:52
  • 1
    @JoeW Citing the OP: "Why isn’t Cheney planning to keep her seat by running as an independent (against Harriet Hageman, a pro-Trump candidate, will be the Republican nominee in November.)?"" ""Does Wyoming law prevent her from doing so, or does she simply think it would be futile?"" Wyoming law will not have effect preventing Liz from running against Trump in the presidential election, but state representative in the coming general election.
    – r13
    Aug 18 at 2:01
  • 1
    @JoeW :) I think you were missing my comment which was directed at the OP's concern - the viability and possibility of Liz, as an independent, vs Harriet Hageman and the Democrat candidate in the upcoming general election. james K answered correctly.
    – r13
    Aug 18 at 3:06

1 Answer 1

9

Liz Cheney would not be elegible due to Wyoming's sore loser law.

WY Stat § 22-5-302 (2014)
22-5-302. Unsuccessful primary candidates precluded.

An unsuccessful candidate for office at a primary election, whose name is printed on any party ballot, may not seek nomination by petition for the same office at the next general election.

It is unlikely that she would want to anyway, her result in the primary puts her in a very weak position. Among Republicans, it is clear that Hageman is preferred by a margin of 2:1. And some of Cheney's republican supporters would not vote for her in the General for fear of allowing the Democratic party candidate to win.

Democrats (a minority in Wyoming) would be unlikely to support Cheney, apart from her Anti-trump stand, most of the rest of her policies are fairly conventional Republican policies (Remember her criticism of environmental groups). And for the same reason, Cheney is very unlikely to switch to the Democratic party, she simply isn't a supporter of the wider Liberal platform of the party.

Independents might support Cheney, but there are not enough to give her the win. Only about 1/8 of voters identify as unaffiliated.

And if she has ambitions to be President, running as a spoiler is not likely to win support among the conservative sector of the American public.

3
  • My previouis answer was incorrect, as pointed out but JoeW
    – James K
    Aug 18 at 9:15
  • "Only about 1/8 of voters identify as unaffiliated." Is this among Wyoming voters or general voters in the United States? In the U.S., as a rule, "swing" voters represent slightly above 1/3rd of the voter base while both parties are slightly below 1/3rd of the base.
    – hszmv
    Aug 19 at 11:13
  • I forget to transfer the source from the other answer: See sos.wyo.gov/Elections/Docs/VRStats/2022/22JanVR_Stats.pdf
    – James K
    Aug 19 at 12:18

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .