6

As far as I understand, a landmass of people is considered a colony of a stronger country if that landmass has no participation in the decision-making process of that power.

For example, before 1947, India didn't have any participation in the British parliament.

Does Hong Kong participate in PRC's decision-making process?

If not, what differentiates Hong Kong from a colony?

2
  • 1
    For such an interesting and nuanced question that's gone HNQ I think it's better if you don't insta-accept the first answer posted, which has the potential do disincentivize further answer posts and views. Why not wait a few days and let it go around the world a few times? The way your question is written readers will be expecting a "yes" or "no" answer and looking at the one you've accepted I don't see anything like that.
    – uhoh
    Commented Oct 24, 2022 at 22:11
  • 1
    Hmm, but in some countries, the decision making process doesn't involve most of the main country itself. Does this mean such countries are their own colonies? Commented Oct 25, 2022 at 1:17

1 Answer 1

7

Hong Kong is a Special Administrative Region and so has significantly more autonomy than other parts of the PRC. Nonetheless, like other regions, it sends delegates (36 of them) to the highest national legislature, the National People's Congress. However, this legislature meets infrequently and so the de facto legislature of the PRC is often considered to be the National People's Congress Standing Committee. Hong Kong sends a single delegate to that body. The current delegate is Tam Yiu-chung. He succeeded Rita Fan in 2018.

2
  • 1
    Does Tam Yiu-chung actually bring any of HK's input to PRC's decision-making process? The question asks "Does Hong Kong participate in PRC's decision-making process?" which seems to ask for something like a boolean answer. I can't tell if you are answering closer to "yes" or "no" here, so right now this does not seem to try to answer the question as asked.
    – uhoh
    Commented Oct 24, 2022 at 22:08
  • 1
    I'm also 1) confused what "autonomy has to do with anything here, and 2) curious about how valid your first sentence is in 2022. To that end I've just asked Does Hong Kong really have "...significantly more autonomy than other parts of the PRC" in 2022? If so, how exactly?
    – uhoh
    Commented Oct 24, 2022 at 22:21

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .