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In a Wikipedia article I read about a couple of banned parties operating in China in the underground.

Are there any more underground parties that don't get coverage in China?

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    I also read the Wikipedia article and could not find information about parties that are banned and operating in the underground. The page rather lists parties that have been banned and there is still the possibility that they simply ceased to exist. Could you help me find the information about the banned parties still operating? Jun 3, 2023 at 21:34
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    Also I think it's safe to say that as soon as the public knows about such a party still operating the Chinese government will try to hunt them down. Therefore little reliable information should exist and the answers might be too speculative or rather vague making it maybe not an ideal fit here. It may be one of these topics where you maybe cannot know the truth. Jun 3, 2023 at 21:37
  • Opposition parties all around China?
    – convert
    Jun 4, 2023 at 8:38
  • The notion of "underground" is kind of a challenge. If they are really such, then there would be no official knowledge of them. For example, I have no faintest clue what underground political movements might exist in my own country.
    – Boba Fit
    Jun 4, 2023 at 19:40
  • @BobaFit Agree, the question is a bit self-negating. If someone answers with a credible organization, then it won't be underground any more.
    – M. Y. Zuo
    Jun 12, 2023 at 14:36

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Yes, but they cannot organise in a way that presents any kind of threat to the CCP without being shut down.

In a democratic country, a political party will have a membership, it will raise money, it will therefore have a constitution, a bank account, a group of trustees and so on. None of these are possible in China.

Instead, Amnesty International talks about "civil society organizations." These will be small and informal. It is out of the question that they could openly campaign. They certainly couldn't have a bank account. They might be a social media group, or an informal association that follows a blog.

There may be groups which are outwardly non-political, but in which the members have a common interest in politics.

Such groups may still be subject to the National Security Law and Societies Ordinance. If the police suspect that a video games group is starting to talk politics at its meetings, they can and will shut them down, and possibly incarnate the leaders.

Amnesty don't name or identify such groups - as to do so would cause them to be targeted, so I shan't either.

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    I'm just going to leave that typo, because it is funny.
    – James K
    Jun 3, 2023 at 21:01
  • So the Western countries are all so democratic?Not only CIA is invading your personal life by spying on you constantly if you say that you dont like e.g Biden you may be fired from your current job?Or if you have a different opinion you get expelled from school?thehill.com/changing-america/respect/equality/… and nbcnews.com/news/us-news/… and many more
    – Volpina
    Jun 6, 2023 at 7:32
  • When you say "In a democratic country,..."you should also include references to all "democratic countries"
    – Volpina
    Jun 6, 2023 at 7:33
  • @Volpina You might need to clarify your comments. The two stories linked have nothing to do with the CIA. The first story is regarding an administration overstepping 1st amendment rights of a student by allegedly violating religious beliefs. The 2nd story is more akin to the lady that refused to give out marriage certificates to gay couples based on her personal religious beliefs. Employees of the school were providing a political/religious service outside of the administrations guidelines. What they did would be no different than to put a Christian cross, Star of David, or Swastikas' on doors
    – David S
    Jun 6, 2023 at 17:51
  • You answer "Yes", but state they cannot organise in a way that presents any kind of threat to the CCP without being shut down. ... None of these are possible in China. ... "civil society organizations." ... small and informal. So shouldn't your answer to the Q be "No"?
    – user103496
    Dec 23, 2023 at 4:46

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