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An article at Politico by Jonathan Martin refers to constituency or faction (apparently) made up of white female moderate suburban Republicans in "the Lululemon belt — from Buckhead to Bala Cynwyd."

Lululemon is a leading seller of high end yoga apparel. Bala Cynwyd is a southern suburb of Philadelphia. Buckhead is in northern suburban Atlanta.

The larger context of the quote in which this appears is as follows:

Much like McCarthy, the once-promising Trump alternative, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, sought to blur the lines between the pre- and post-Trump party. DeSantis was, he said all but explicitly, the way out of the party having to decide.

He could deliver all the Magalicious pugnacity and enough of the populism to Trump’s legions. But the 40-something father of three young children would do it in a package that wouldn’t send the voters of the Lululemon belt — from Buckhead to Bala Cynwyd — back to Joe Biden’s column.

Is this demographic-geographic descriptor and turn of phrase original to Martin in this article, or is this term one that was already in use? If so, when and where?

Are there other terms that are commonly used that identify the same demographic within the Republican Party in the United States?

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    Voting to close as off-topic. In my opinion this term is clearly Martin's, but what sort of evidence are you expecting beyond the lack of older, relevant results from a web search?
    – Brian Z
    Oct 20, 2023 at 1:04
  • It related terminology related to the description of a political group (cf. the Bible Belt). I'm interested in finding potential sourcing because doing so would tap into a vein of interesting discussion of political identity and the factions that make up the political coalitions of the major U.S. political parties.
    – ohwilleke
    Oct 20, 2023 at 1:18
  • refers to constituency or faction (apparently) made up of white female moderate suburban Republicans Where does that writer say that "Lululemon belt" refers to "white female moderate suburban Republicans"?
    – user103496
    Oct 20, 2023 at 1:19
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    Journalists/writers are constantly coining new phrases, hoping their new phrase catches on and they become that much more famous. (Most of the time they fail.)
    – user103496
    Oct 20, 2023 at 1:23
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    @ohwileke I you want to "tap into a vein of interesting discussion of political identity" then elaborate a question about that. The trivial etymology question is not so interesting and has already been answered.
    – Brian Z
    Oct 20, 2023 at 2:31

1 Answer 1

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Jonathan Martin.

Is this demographic-geographic descriptor and turn of phrase original to Martin in this article

Yes.

is this term one that was already in use?

No.

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  • And on what basis do you reach this conclusion?
    – ohwilleke
    Oct 20, 2023 at 1:18
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    @ohwilleke: google.com/search?q=%22Lululemon+belt%22+republicans "About 19 results" which include this post and the cited article. All other results are irrelevant. (I had also never heard of this phrase "Lululemon belt" in connection to Republicans.)
    – user103496
    Oct 20, 2023 at 1:20
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    You might be right, but one of the joys of Politics.SE is that its brain trust can figure out things that a simple Google search does not.
    – ohwilleke
    Oct 20, 2023 at 1:27

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