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I suspect that between new Congresses, given the turnover in people, that there is a lower likelihood for prior bills to pass. However is there a rule on this - are bills that have not passed in a particular Congress automatically ended (/required to be resubmitted) if not enacted within that particular Congress?

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Yes, a bill exists only during the Congress in which it was introduced. I'm not actually aware of a provision in the rules saying this, so you'll have to settle for the Clerk of the House of Representatives.

When does a bill become "dead" or no longer open to consideration?

A bill may be introduced at any point during a two-year Congress. It will remain eligible for consideration throughout the duration of that Congress until the Congress ends or adjourns sine die.

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  • Thanks! For reference to anyone else, the relevant part of what was linked to is 11. When does a bill become "dead" or no longer open to consideration? A bill may be introduced at any point during a two-year Congress. It will remain eligible for consideration throughout the duration of that Congress until the Congress ends or adjourns sine die. – kyrenia Feb 2 '16 at 3:47
  • This makes sense--after that 2-yr. period there is an election and many new members of Congress will replace those who had worked on that bill so the work done up to then shouldn't be binding on the new body of elected officials who have their own ideas of what legislation should receive their attention. However, a bill can be reintroduced in the new Congress, with whatever changes might have been worked out in the past. It simply has to start the process from square 1. – Schneb Dec 29 '20 at 6:12

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