Questions tagged [comparative-politics]

Questions about the field in political science that works empirically. A common method is the comparison of different countries through time.

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9
votes
4answers
625 views

How common is pairing?

This question introduced me to an interesting legislative behavior called pairing. In some legislatures, when a member of one party is unable to vote the opposing party may decide to ask one of their ...
1
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1answer
81 views

Do snap/early elections usually benefit those triggering them?

I'm looking for an empirical survey (that hopefully covers more than one country) addressing the issue whether snap/early elections typically benefit those calling them, either the sole party in power ...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

Are party fractionalization and ideological polarization independent (uncorrelated)?

A bold finding of a 2008 study by Russell J. Dalton is that--across the world--party fractionalization (roughly: how many parties there are in a country's legislative bodies, technically the ...
2
votes
0answers
336 views

What are different ways of allocating investigative power?

Background - The U.S. allocation of investigative power In the U.S. system of government, there are a variety of ways that a potential incident or public policy issue of concern can be investigated. ...
2
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0answers
138 views

Which countries have largely copied article 49 para 3 of the French constitution?

Roughly speaking, article 49.3 of the French constitution allows the government to pass a law without an explicit vote in the legislative assembly by "committing government's responsibility". The ...
5
votes
5answers
612 views

Why isn't it mandatory for elected members of parliaments to have knowledge on the constitution?

In most democracies, elected members of parliament are representatives of people who elect them. They are also supposed to pass laws, make amendments and perform other functions. Being representatives,...
4
votes
2answers
284 views

Is the US-based observation that “the larger the proportion of minorities, the more exclusionary the electoral system” generalizable?

Trebbi et al. (2008) have observed that (in the US): Majorities tend to disenfranchise minorities through strategic manipulation of electoral rules. With the aim of explaining changes in electoral ...
2
votes
3answers
1k views

Jumping political party OK after being elected by people into a party?

Is it permissible for an elected independent candidate or elected representative of a political party to switch his party he is elected from to a more politically advantageous party at his own will ? ...
2
votes
2answers
145 views

Do any countries use a codified version of the “matter of confidence” of (former) UK tradition?

By tradition that appears to be in question now there used to be case in the UK that governments could designate a particular vote as being a ‘matter of confidence’ – which means they would ...