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1answer
52 views

Which (subjective) measure of corruption is the best predictor for an outsider winning a major election?

There's a (somewhat vague) theory that once the electorate starts to believe the political system is corrupt, it is more likely to vote for an outsider (someone who hasn't had a long political career) ...
2
votes
1answer
245 views

Are there any proposed systems to bring more long-term planning into (democratic) government?

In much of the world, (liberal) democracy (in a broad sense) is seen as the best (or least bad) system of government, and in the 20th and 21st century, living standards have improved markedly in ...
1
vote
1answer
240 views

Does any country “filter” otherwise eligible political candidates?

In Brazil, almost anyone can enter politics as long as they meet these conditions: must have Brazilian nationality or be naturalized; be in full exercise of political rights; be listed in the ...
6
votes
2answers
291 views

Why is the voter turnout at EU level so low compared to national elections?

The voter turnout in the European elections in Germany in 2019 for instance was only around 62%. Notable this is still much higher than it was in previous EU elections there… Additionally the voter ...
1
vote
1answer
86 views

Do snap/early elections usually benefit those triggering them?

I'm looking for an empirical survey (that hopefully covers more than one country) addressing the issue whether snap/early elections typically benefit those calling them, either the sole party in power ...
0
votes
1answer
84 views

How does the possibility of snap elections provide an electoral benefit to voters?

I live in Canada, which used to have, inspired by the British system, federal elections every 5 years, plus the possibility of snap elections. It was actually reformed to every 4 years, fixed. My ...
52
votes
13answers
9k views

Why does partisanship trump concerns about hypocrisy with voters?

Politicians are routinely hypocritical in support of partisan ends. I'll provide a few examples to demonstrate what I mean: When their party's nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court is facing ...
17
votes
4answers
1k views

Do any theories justify majoritarian election outcomes?

At legislative elections, parties can experience different biases in the translation of votes to seats. Grofman, Koetzle, and Brunell published a taxonomy of these biases (Malapportionment, turnout ...
4
votes
2answers
293 views

Is the US-based observation that “the larger the proportion of minorities, the more exclusionary the electoral system” generalizable?

Trebbi et al. (2008) have observed that (in the US): Majorities tend to disenfranchise minorities through strategic manipulation of electoral rules. With the aim of explaining changes in electoral ...
6
votes
3answers
416 views

Number of winning coalitions of state in the electoral college

Define a coalition as a subset of the set of the 51 states (counting DC as a state) that make the USA. Define a coalition as winning if the total number of electoral votes of the state in that ...
5
votes
5answers
602 views

In a democracy, who takes care of the interests of the losing side?

There are two sides or more to an election - the winning side will get what it wants (hopefully) the losing side will not. What are some of the ways both sides can benefit or do they have to wait 4 ...