Questions tagged [voting-systems]

For questions about rule systems for scoring votes. Not for questions about country-specific rules or practices but for the theory and practice of voting systems. Examples include proportional-representation and first-past-the-post.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
23 votes
3 answers
5k views

Does Gibbard–Satterthwaite theorem apply to all voting systems?

People often say "It's been mathematically proven that no perfect voting system is possible" and cite Arrow's Impossibility Theorem, but Arrow's theorem specifically only applies to ranked/...
47 votes
9 answers
19k views

What arguments are there against ranked-choice voting?

In America, most elections are based on first-past-the-post voting, where whoever gets a plurality of the votes wins. For instance if candidate A gets 40% of the vote and each of candidates B and C ...
7 votes
2 answers
2k views

What is the most significant currently active organization using quadratic voting?

Is quadratic voting being significantly used anywhere in the world right now? Especially in any type of political system or social structure (beyond blockchains)?
85 votes
10 answers
12k views

Has negative voting ever been officially implemented in elections, or seriously proposed, or even studied?

I struggled to name what I'm asking about here. I'm talking about the kind of voting that happens on many websites, including stackexchange: you can upvote something (a question), or you can downvote ...
2 votes
1 answer
47 views

What voting process to use to fill multiple roles when voted for by the applicants

I'm looking for a voting system for a specific usecase: I have a scenario where a small group of (less than twenty) members will need to fill a number of roles. They should each be able to list their ...
13 votes
4 answers
3k views

Could the US become a multi-party democracy organically (without a change to the constitution)?

In many northern European countries (Germany, the Netherlands, Denmark) there is a large number of political parties and the government is always made up of a coalition of these because no single ...
51 votes
4 answers
7k views

Has there ever been a successful shift from a two-party system to a multi-party system in modern history?

The other day my friends and I gathered in the college dorm and expressed grievances about our electoral systems. Those from countries where one or two parties dominate the legislature were frustrated ...
5 votes
6 answers
395 views

What is an example of a political process in which every person’s vote amounts to something?

One of the most common grievances against elections is that it doesn’t matter if you vote because it won’t make a difference how the world is or significantly sway the outcome of an election. What is ...
6 votes
1 answer
312 views

Congressional vs. Party Votes: Secrets & Differences

In the domain of voting methodologies, what moral, ethical, and procedural distinctions arise when comparing secret ballots in congressional votes and party votes? Why do the principles and rationales ...
5 votes
5 answers
428 views

Where does First Past The Post voting favour left wing parties?

Today's UK by-elections are set to demonstrate the effect of spoiler candidates on a First Past The Post ballot. In the UK it is pretty clear that First Past The Post (FPTP) benefits the right-wing ...
2 votes
1 answer
141 views

Gerrymandering, Efficiency Gap Formula [closed]

I have a problem in which I have two parties. Party 1 is Purple. Party 2 is Yellow. There are a total of 135 votes. Purple has 75 of them while yellow has 60. There are 9 districts total. Each ...
13 votes
3 answers
3k views

In countries using Single Transferable Vote, how are voting results presented?

In electoral systems based on parties, it is easy to publish the results: it is sufficient to publish the number of votes each party received. These numbers contain all the information that is needed ...
9 votes
3 answers
411 views

Why the US does not have strong local parties except in Puerto Rico?

Often as a cause of two-party system in the US cited the first-past-the-post system. (see also Duverger's Law). But theoretically this should not prevent having strong local state-level parties. It ...
4 votes
1 answer
224 views

What is the maximum number of seats possible in the Bundestag?

As we know, the German Bundestag uses a mixed-member proportional (MMP) electoral system, with constituency votes that are majoritarian (299 seats) and party votes that are proportional (299 seats), ...
12 votes
2 answers
759 views

Did the 2022 Alaska congressional special election have a Condorcet winner, who was not elected?

Does anyone know if Begich may have been the Condorcet winner? Nic Tideman emailed me a few days ago, asking me this question. I sure as hell do not know unless we can get the records of the ...
21 votes
4 answers
669 views

What legal impediments might there be to alternate voting systems?

Most jurisdictions in the US use first-past-the-post voting. This appears to me to be a historical artifact; I'm not aware of any legal impediments on a federal level that would prevent states or ...
13 votes
3 answers
4k views

Voting system with two votes as a defense against fear of voting for a loser - is it anywhere in the world?

In some countries there is a big fear among voters of voting for a party that doesn't end up in the parliament because they didn't reach the minimum threshold of votes, making their votes go in vain. ...
9 votes
7 answers
840 views

Why isn't approval voting used more often in elections?

Approval voting is a single-winner electoral system where each voter may select ("approve") any number of candidates. The winner is the most-approved candidate. On paper, approval voting seems like ...
10 votes
2 answers
527 views

Have any municipalities in the US ever used approval voting?

Approval voting is an alternate voting system which some people believe has many advantages over our standard first-past-the-post system. Instead of marking a single candidate, the voter marks every ...
8 votes
6 answers
615 views

Plurality voting: Advantages?

Context: I'm a 1st time voter in a plurality voting state. As part of deciding how I'm going to vote, I'm trying to know what is the intention of a state choosing plurality vote (I'm assuming they all ...
6 votes
2 answers
289 views

Do any voting system models try to take "realistic" tactical voting into account?

In standard voting system models (see example), there are two types of voters: honest voters who always choose their preferred candidate(s) and tactical voters who try to maximize the expected weight ...
2 votes
3 answers
292 views

What is the significance of the non-dictatorship principle in Arrow's theorem, and does this example fit the definition of a dictator? [duplicate]

Arrow's non-dictatorship principle states that "no single voter possesses the power to always determine the group's preference." I am unsure if I am missing some nuance from this definition, ...
15 votes
6 answers
2k views

What if no party crosses the electoral threshold in a parliamentary election?

In some countries, there is an electoral threshold that political parties must cross to win seats in the parliament. For example, in Germany, the threshold is 5% of national votes, in Sweden the ...
14 votes
4 answers
3k views

Which electoral systems minimise the extent to which political parties control who gets elected?

Political parties are, obviously, very important in democratic systems. Most candidates will be selected by a party. But many systems make it easy for the party to control which specific members end ...
16 votes
1 answer
269 views

Does stronger geographic representation lead to stronger regional identities?

Are there any studies which would conclude whether stronger geographic representation in voting systems is a significant contributor to strong regional identities in a country?
12 votes
10 answers
2k views

Are/were there any countries where rich people have more votes?

Are/were there any countries where richer people have more active votes than poorer people? For example: someone with an income of $5,000/month would have 5x more votes than a person with an income of ...
3 votes
3 answers
138 views

General term for voting system where one group pre-selects n out of m, other selects 1 out of n?

The Wikipedia article on Opus Dei, the somewhat controversial, conservative institution of the Roman Catholic Church, currently explains an aspect of the institution's leadership selection procedures ...
4 votes
2 answers
721 views

Condorcet method for two seats

Condorcet method is an election system where voters rate their candidates in order of preference. As an example, for candidates A B and C, a valid vote can be [A > B > C], [C > B > A], [B > A > C] etc....
2 votes
5 answers
330 views

Is first-past-the-post (plurality voting) neither an ordinal nor a cardinal method?

Wikipedia says: Cardinal methods (based on cardinal utility) and ordinal methods (based on ordinal preferences, also called ranked voting) are two main categories of modern voting systems, along ...
6 votes
1 answer
202 views

Which voting system criterion requires that changing your preference order of some candidates won't affect whether other candidates are elected?

Consider an election in which one voter's preference order was Alice > Bob > Carol. If she were to change her preference order to Carol > Alice > Bob, there are 9 possibilities as to what ...
1 vote
1 answer
237 views

Why does it have to be 50-50 in Germany's Bundestag [duplicate]

In Germany's Bundestag, 299 seats are for proportional representation and the other 299 are for regional representation in a first-past-the-post system. Is it just a coincidence that the seats are ...
8 votes
6 answers
3k views

How do party-list systems accommodate independent candidates?

I'm curious if there are countries that use party-list system while also allowing independent candidates to run? Logistically, what would the implementation look like? Do the independent candidates ...
-5 votes
2 answers
157 views

How prevalent is AI in electoral counting in different countries, or why is it not more prevalent?

How prevalent is AI in electoral counting in different countries, or why is it not more prevalent ? I see an ideal electoral counting system as one using both AI and human counters At each human ...
9 votes
6 answers
467 views

Polarization and electoral systems

Posted this question on Reddit. I am crossposting it here as well: https://www.reddit.com/r/AskSocialScience/comments/vpnviu/polarization_and_electoral_systems/ Is there research linking polarization ...
18 votes
5 answers
3k views

Ranked voting by a committee when some members cannot vote for a particular candidate because of a conflict of interest

I'm in a 12-person committee where we have to rank 5 candidates whom we have interviewed for a position. Some members of the committee have a conflict of interest, so they had to leave the room when a ...
-5 votes
3 answers
345 views

Would ranked choice voting force single issue voters to vote for more than one candidate or not be counted? [closed]

I am running for Senate in NJ in 2024 and I believe my voting bloc is merely a plural majority of all eligible voters but maybe not a majority (and probably not current voters, btw). If this is the ...
6 votes
3 answers
251 views

Ranked choice voting: Can a candidate who got dropped in early round come back in later rounds?

Location: Any country or state that uses RCV. One that has used it for a while and worked out the kinks would be preferable. Edit for clarity: I am talking about the “instant runoff” kind of RCV in a ...
25 votes
8 answers
6k views

Why does ranked-choice voting give such high preference to the second choice of the least-favored candidate's voters?

Ranked choice voting is in the news lately because of the big mess New York City has made of implementing it in its Democratic primaries for the mayoral race. But in the talk about how it works, one ...
3 votes
1 answer
403 views

Difference between RCV and STV

My question is about de difference between RCV and STV. If I am correct they are both voting systems where you are selecting multiple candidates and where the candidate with the lowest amount of votes ...
1 vote
0 answers
47 views

In open-list systems, how do individual candidates promote themselves while being a team player?

In open-list systems, political candidates are expected to promote their party platform while simultaneously advocate for a personal mandate so they can rise higher on the list. This might create a ...
-8 votes
2 answers
259 views

What is the point in having a democracy if it is unable to elect the smartest people? [closed]

Check this answer: https://politics.stackexchange.com/a/11185/32479 The government is supposed to be representative of its people. If the people are a bunch of idiots then the government should ...
4 votes
3 answers
323 views

Is Zelig an Arrovian dictator?

This question is a follow-up to this one, and particular serves to clarify a potential error in one of the presented references. The Context When elaborating Arrow’s non-dictatorship criterion, the ...
-3 votes
5 answers
461 views

What are the possible solutions for a "stupid people in large numbers" situation in a democracy? [closed]

Context It's said that "Democracy counts the heads but doesn't weigh the brains". I think there's a book with that title but I didn't read it. So, what if the less intelligent people ...
0 votes
1 answer
513 views

Why is the majority bonus systems so rarely used across the world?

According to Wikipedia the majority bonus system is used only by a few countries: Armenia San Marino Italy Argentina (Chamber of Deputies of the Province of Santa Fe and the Province of Entre Ríos ...
26 votes
8 answers
5k views

What are the disadvantages to 2-round elections where the top candidates from the first round compete head-to-head in the second round?

This is the election system in France and Ukraine. In the first round anyone can run. If no candidate wins an absolute majority, then the top two candidates go to a second round where they face off ...
4 votes
1 answer
213 views

Is there a ranked voting variant that prevents vote selling and identification?

As acknowledged also on Wikipedia, one of the drawbacks of ranked choice voting is that "it is likely that many preference voting patterns will be unique to individual voters, which could allow ...
5 votes
1 answer
130 views

What happens when Webster's method can't narrow down to a working divisor?

I've been poking around and without trying, managed to bump into some scenarios where Webster's method gives inconclusive results. The fact I managed it more than once without trying implies to me ...
6 votes
2 answers
483 views

Weighted voting in the UN

Is any voting in the UN ever weighted against the population, contribution or consequences? I understand that some countries have a better footing due to historical reasons. However, just to name some ...
2 votes
1 answer
223 views

Has anyone published a plan for how to modernize the American voting system? [closed]

It’s been said that the American voting system is a relic of the past, with idiosyncratic features due to political negotiations and compromises at the time it was formed. Let’s say in a modern ...
2 votes
0 answers
54 views

Condorcet loser criterion implying majority loser criterion [closed]

I know that it is perfectly clear that Condorcet loser criterion implies majority criterion. However, I am looking for a citable source that states this. Can anyone suggest something? Thanks!

1
2 3 4 5