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4
votes
2answers
431 views

Do individual Commonwealth countries have to accept the new rules of succession?

Roughly coincident with the birth of a child to the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, Parliament is set to make changes to the Act of Succession, allowing females to be directly in the line. The problem ...
8
votes
1answer
532 views

How is constitutional monarchy perceived in Commonwealth realms other than United Kingdom?

Especially in countries with huge population and economy like Canada and Australia, what's the opinion of people about constitutional monarchy? Are there any well known groups or indivuals who opposes ...
5
votes
1answer
185 views

Do scholars still use Mussolini's taxonomy of the history of capitalism?

Benito Mussolini divided the history of capitalism from 1830 to at least 1933 into "heroic capitalism" (1830-1870), "static capitalism" (1870-1914) and "supercapitalism" (1914-?). Are this division, ...
18
votes
2answers
1k views

Is there a link between political system and any of the various quality of life indicators, including environmental impacts?

This question asks about the correlation between political system and economic growth. A similar but distinctly different question: is there any correlation between political system and one of the ...
23
votes
3answers
2k views

What exactly formally constitutes recognition of a country?

So, there is a spectrum of political entities that make up the national stage. There is, of course, the "nation-state" like the U.S.A, China, Russia, Germany, Lithuania, you name it - full fledged "...
13
votes
1answer
609 views

Does any organisation refer to itself as terrorist?

Does any organisation refer to itself as terrorist ? It seems to me this word is only used by political opponents to such organisations, as the term terrorism has a quite negative connotation. But I'm ...
10
votes
4answers
1k views

Are the viable political alternatives in the US (e.g. Democrats and Republicans) considered (far) left and (far) right?

This question phrases the US political situation as: Today the federal government is in a seemingly interminable pendulum effect going between far-right and far-left. Coming from Europe and ...
9
votes
3answers
3k views

Does Anonymous have a coherent ideology?

The direct action group Anonymous has gained a great deal of attention in recent years as a result of its various "ops", usually targeted against governments and large corporations. However, because ...
5
votes
1answer
229 views

Are there any major parties identifying themselves with Rosa Luxemburg's ideas?

It's difficult for me to understand why I'm not hearing about any Luxemburgist parties. The ideas of Rosa Luxemburg seem not to have been refuted like some other branches of communist theory have in ...
3
votes
2answers
424 views

How have greater than two party systems functioned in the past?

An earlier question (Why can't voting be fair if there are more than two alternatives?) got me thinking. Are there any examples of governments where more than 2 parties have had major roles in the ...
20
votes
8answers
3k views

Has a libertarian party ever won a parliamentary election anywhere?

Libertarian ideas seem to have a strong following in the developed world, but I've never heard of any libertarian party being in power. In Poland, where I live, the main libertarian party (which might ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

How does Social Security work in the United States?

There are political discussions in the United States regarding whether Social Security is maintainable over time. I want to know how the Social Security system works in United States, and what the ...
4
votes
3answers
395 views

Was the war in Iraq legal according to the US law?

Is it true that the recent war conducted by The United States in Iraq was undeclared and illegal? Have there been any rulings by the US courts on this? What are the arguments for and against the ...
44
votes
6answers
24k views

Why don't British kings and queens veto laws? [duplicate]

I've learned from Wikipedia that the British king or queen has the right to veto laws, but they don't use the right. Why is that? Is it because of tradition, respect for democracy, some regulations or ...
12
votes
2answers
3k views

Is there a correlation between political system and economic growth?

I would like to know whether there are any pieces of scientific research indicating that some political systems are more likely to produce a large economic growth than others. Which systems are they? ...
3
votes
1answer
242 views

What do the US and Australian governments gain from a marine presence in Darwin?

The US has decided to establish a permanent marine presence in Darwin. What do benefits do both governments gain from this?
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Did Plato's The Republic influence any of the 20th century's despotic regimes?

Did Plato's The Republic and the ideas presented in it have any practical influence on any of the 20th century's despotic regimes? The idea of despotism of the wisest, those that know better than the ...
17
votes
2answers
4k views

Is there any mechanism in USA to prevent someone from voting by mail AND in person?

Theoretically speaking, there are mechanisms that prevent someone from voting twice (you are only allocated to vote to one polling place based on your residence address, and that polling place has a ...
9
votes
5answers
2k views

Why does the United States have voting districts?

Why do we in the United States have voting districts? Wouldn't it be better to allow people to vote wherever is most convenient and then group relevant votes based on the voters' addresses? Since we ...
8
votes
3answers
13k views

May the United States Congress remove any secretary?

Is it possible for a United States Secretary to be removed by the House of Representatives or the Senate?
9
votes
2answers
1k views

Why was the Electoral College the system selected by the founding fathers?

What advantages did the founding fathers see in electoral college that made them pick it over other potential voting systems?
20
votes
3answers
1k views

What would be required for states to split off and become their own nation?

What would need to happen for a state such as California or Texas to split off and form its own independent nation? Who would need to agree and what would need passing (bills etc.)?
20
votes
2answers
49k views

What are the conditions required for a territory to become part of United States?

This question is very related to Commonwealth United States Insular Areas, where I asked in detail about the Puerto Rico (and other areas) situation. Now I am interested to know which are the legal ...
15
votes
5answers
942 views

How would one explain the E.U. to a 5 year-old?

As the European Union is awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, it would be interesting to have an explanation of the E.U. which a 5 year-old would understand. Is there anybody who can give such an ...
14
votes
2answers
2k views

Can the Chinese government system be considered a limited form of democracy?

According to Wikipedia the Communist Party of China has over 80 million members. It is about 6% of the population! This is more than the total membership in many (or most) western democracies. I'm ...
46
votes
9answers
5k views

Why is economic growth considered so essential, even in rich countries?

Whenever economic growth as a percentage of GDP drops close to zero, economists speak of a recession or even a crisis. In political debate, the focus is quite often on economic growth; in most ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

What are commonly cited pros and cons of central bank independence?

Googling central bank independence brings up a number of articles discussing central bank independence. In summary and in layman's terms, why would it be advantageous for a central bank to be ...
9
votes
1answer
612 views

Did any legislation ever prohibit fractional reserve banking by introducing something like the Chicago Plan?

The Chicago plan involves to impose a 100% reserve on banks, so that banks can no longer create money by lending out. Recently, IMF published a note called The Chicago plan revisited. I'm no economist ...
14
votes
4answers
2k views

Implications of governments borrowing from a central bank rather than issuing money directly

Early in the history of the United States the political battle was fought between those who favored a strong central bank of the United States and others who felt the government reserved the right to ...
6
votes
1answer
466 views

What is the constitutional status of military bases?

Does the United States Constitution have any amendments related to foreign bases? Technically foreign bases aren't U.S. territory, but they must have some laws.
29
votes
3answers
1k views

Has the FairTax ever been implemented anywhere on any scale?

The FairTax is really a set of proposals through which all federal taxes are eliminated and a federal sales tax is implemented. In addition to this, a prebate is given based on the poverty level so ...
7
votes
1answer
53 views

Analyzing Governmental Debt

When looking at the Federal debt there are a lot of ways to interpret the data. You can look at the dollar amount which is currently ~16 trillion or you can analyze it as a percent of the GDP. Are ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

Why does Cuba have two presidents?

I can see that Cuba has its own parliament system - National Assembly of People's Power. However, Wikipedia says Ricardo Alarcón is President of the National Assembly of People's Power, yet Raúl ...
7
votes
1answer
3k views

To what extent has the idea of “laboratories of democracy” worked in the US?

From how I understand it, the idea of "laboratories of democracy" in the US is that state and local governments can better experiment with policies than the entire country can. So we can see what ...
5
votes
1answer
11k views

What are the roles of the two Houses of Parliament in the UK?

Why does the UK have two Houses of Parliament - the House of Commons and the House of Lords - and what are the main roles of each?
3
votes
0answers
80 views

What are the practical differences between a US Senator from a party, and an Independent Senator caucusing with that party? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How do independents choose a party to caucus with? In the USA, you can be elected to the Senate as an "Independent". Notable examples include Bernie Sanders and Joseph ...
13
votes
1answer
1k views

In the U.S., why does the majority party in a new Senate session always approve the filibuster rule?

In the U.S. Senate, the Senate rules apparently do not apply to the first day of a new Senate session until the rules are voted in by a simple majority. Given this, and that the filibuster comes from ...
19
votes
1answer
1k views

In the U.S., how can the filibuster be invoked without continued speeches?

In the U.S. Senate, the filibuster allows a single senator to effectively block a vote by way of the senate rules that allow for unlimited debate, but now, the senate rules have somehow been modified ...
6
votes
2answers
437 views

Constitutionality of the Income Tax

There is a growing movement in the United States of Americans that call into question the constitutionality of the Federal Income tax in the modern age. Understanding that the income tax first came ...
10
votes
4answers
11k views

What are the minimum requirements for a system to be called democratic?

I think the title is very clear, but I'll complete the question below: What are the minimum requirements needed for a system to be called democratic? Is holding elections every n years enough, or ...
13
votes
3answers
11k views

How do independents choose a party to caucus with?

I know that several independents in the US Senate (ie. Bernie Sanders) caucus with the Democrats. Officially, what does that mean? How do independents choose whom to caucus with (both ideologically ...
5
votes
2answers
636 views

What are the conditions and benefits of U.S. insular properties like Puerto Rico? [closed]

I always wanted to know which is the legal status of the associated states of United States like Puerto Rico. Who is the state head, of this kind of territory? Why can't they vote for the United ...
11
votes
1answer
284 views

How is corruption measured?

The 2012 Corruption Perceptions Index was just published and according to it, Greece has the dubious honour of being the most corrupted member of the European Union. Naturally this stung a bit, and ...
8
votes
4answers
2k views

Why are political party memberships public in the US?

It seems strange that a country like the USA that has anonymous voting has the government knowing if you are a member of a political party: " In many states, election officials disclose how many ...
8
votes
1answer
11k views

How does early voting work, and what are the pros and cons?

During the last American presidential election, it seemed to me like early voting was getting more attention than in previous campaigns. The Democratic candidate, Barack Obama, even voted early ...
11
votes
1answer
446 views

What are typical consequences for a political party of losing an independence referendum?

The signature policy of the devolved Scottish government's ruling party (the Scottish National Party) is that Scotland should be an independent state, separate from the United Kingdom. To that end, ...
37
votes
7answers
16k views

What are the key factors for the rise of nationalism in Europe?

In the past decade there has been a constant rise of nationalism in European politics, with nationalist parties gaining popularity in almost every member of the European Union. The canonical example ...
8
votes
1answer
852 views

In models of income distribution, is inequality a natural outcome?

From The Oxford Handbook of Political Economy (2006): Two of the more influential papers that examine inequality within a median voter context are Persson and Tabellini (1994) and Alesina and ...
13
votes
2answers
5k views

What criteria does a US Presidential candidate need to meet in order to appear on the ballot?

The eligibility requirements to run for the office of President are: You must be a native born citizen You must be at least 35 years of age You must have lived in the US for at least 14 years (...
33
votes
4answers
4k views

In the Electoral College, why can electors vote in contrast to their pledge ('faithless')?

The United States uses an Electoral College system, where electors pledge to cast their vote in a particular way. However, these electors have the ability to vote in a manner that directly contradicts ...

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