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Results tagged with Search options user 12228

Questions relating to the government and politics of the United Kingdom, including that of Scotland, Wales, England, and Northern Ireland.

7
votes
Both of the above answers are partial only. To see why, and find a more accurate answer, you need to look back at why there is a problem in the first place. First off, the entire agreement is pretty …
answered Jun 20 '19 by Stilez
4
votes
2answers
In the UK, there is no concept of an "official name". A person's name is simply, whatever name they choose to use and be known by. They can change it or use more that one name in different contexts. …
asked Sep 6 '18 by Stilez
1
vote
A court can intervene in several ways. The main one would be a judicial review, where a court looks at the governments conduct and asks if it was an act that was both legal, and which a reasonable gov …
answered Apr 2 '19 by Stilez
23
votes
5answers
Given that the Prime Minister's activity that has given rise to discontent in her own party, that any EU deal is subject to an imminent meaningful vote, and that no alternative candidate nor markedly …
asked Dec 12 '18 by Stilez
16
votes
I've recently explained the backstop in this answer, a few days ago. The problem here is that one has to understand that breaching it would also breach the Peace Agreement. Some readers might not be …
answered Aug 27 '19 by Stilez
14
votes
1answer
According to the BBC, today's vote by the UK Parliament that finds the government in contempt, is said to have "huge" constitutional and political significance". Setting aside the immediate issue an …
asked Dec 4 '18 by Stilez
3
votes
2answers
In the last few months, the UK has seen what might be called an "activist parliament". There have been comments on TV/radio in the context of Brexit, that MPs have been setting their own agenda, not j …
asked Feb 28 '19 by Stilez
12
votes
2answers
As worded, the referendum was between two choices - leave or stay. But realistically, if there had been a mechanism for it, there would have been other choices on the list, reflecting the nuances of f …
asked Sep 4 '19 by Stilez
23
votes
To add a bit more (I read the full rulings which are interesting), the supreme court didn't say Teresa May (i.e., the government based on the prime minister's wish) could not trigger article 50. Wha …
answered Mar 20 '17 by Stilez
28
votes
11answers
This question is prompted by a comment on the radio today, in which it was stated that house prices in the UK are about 10x average earnings (compared to the historically safe ratio for a mortage of a …
asked Mar 5 '18 by Stilez
92
votes
The problem stems from three issues. I'll explain those, then the backstop issue will be more obvious. Brexit will create two sovereign regions, with (over time) different borders and import rules. …
answered Aug 24 '19 by Stilez
5
votes
1answer
Coming as no surprise whatsoever, the 2019 EU elections will be an interesting event in the UK. Notable features seem to be: The election may act as a proxy vote on brexit, and on various parties' a …
asked May 9 '19 by Stilez
7
votes
Part of the rule of law, is to ensure that a person complies with the law. UK law states that if someone is required to attend court, and is allowed to go their own way on the understanding they will …
answered Mar 9 '18 by Stilez
5
votes
1answer
Suppose I vote today, in the UK general election, by making a mark as usual in a box, but I also add a protest comment in handwriting on the ballot form. Does this stop my vote being valid or counte …
asked Dec 12 '19 by Stilez