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Results tagged with Search options user 17015

To be used in relation to questions about the process in which a representative democracy elects its representatives, including how they are physically counted. Not to be used for questions about how the votes are scored, which are covered under voting-systems.

11
votes
It would be difficult to enforce, given anonymous paper ballots. There would be other types of votes that would "defeat the purpose of compulsory voting" almost as much. In the US, in many races … , and impossible in a referenda, but randomly choosing between options would have the same effect, statistically, as not voting (albeit not as detectable as a protest vote). Blank votes don't actually …
answered Oct 3 '18 by Acccumulation
5
votes
According to Duverger's Law, the first past the post voting system favours the two largest parties in an election. No, it doesn't. Per Wikipedia: In political science, Duverger's law holds …
answered Oct 9 '17 by Acccumulation