19

As of December 2017, the Security Council continues to produce resolutions that condemn terrorism and authorise (resolutions 2395 and 2396). There does not appear to be a resolution that notes the defeat of any terrorist group in the region. Article 5 was not written in anticipation of a terrorist conflict, instead it expects war with a State actor that ...


11

After 2001 when Taliban Government fell then there was a question of who (and more importantly how) will rule the Afghanistan? So, there was a conference in Bonn,Germany. Hamid Karzai was appointed the chairman of interim administration. Later he won the election of 2004. However, Hamid Karzai had some contention with the USA. He always wanted USA to take ...


10

I am an Afghan national and I have worked 6 years with US Army Marines, British Army and private contractors. The truth is that our government is corrupt and no soldier is going to die for 200$ a month for a corrupt government. The second reason is NATO leaving Afghanistan. At the beginning there were almost 150,000 soldiers from different country now there ...


9

Your question is extremely relevant and I was very surprised that nobody asked it earlier on Politics.SE: I was curious myself a month back, but didn't have to ask here because I got my answers from the very comprehensive Wikipedia article on this topic, which starts thusly: Opium production in Afghanistan has been on the rise since U.S. occupation ...


6

One of the very few good things the Taliban did while in charge of Afghanistan was crack down on opium farming as an immoral activity. However, one has to contrast that against the many bad things they did, such as executions on flimsy premises, destruction of ancient cultural artifacts, and providing a base of operations for Al Qaida, from which they ...


6

Typically, air cargo is rather different than train/truck/ship cargo. Air transport is expensive, so air cargo is usually restricted to valuable or perishable goods that need to be moved quickly. Take a look at "the common frontier": Goes through those little hills called the Himalayas, through a region with few roads, and the few roads there seem to have ...


5

Actually, they seem to have tried to ban its production circa year 2000, according to one academic paper: From late 2000 and the year that followed, the Taliban enforced a ban on poppy farming via threats, forced eradication, and public punishment of transgressors. The result was a 99% reduction in the area of opium poppy farming in Taliban-controlled ...


3

The Vice documentary "This is what winning looks like" might give you a few helpful pointers: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ja5Q75hf6QI It lays bare the unfortunate inadequacy and corruption of Afghan troops, their low discipline, and their lack of support within the population in the countryside. The takeaway and answer to your question might best be ...


3

I was born and raised in Afghanistan, and I remember when Taliban was in power. I was a 12 years old kid, and in our village, people would grow poppies and sell the opium to the smugglers. However, people were not allowed to smoke it, as it was forbidden. The Taliban said that it's also a kind of jihad against non believers, because the heroin will go to ...


3

Your question begins with incorrect assumptions. The Taliban does not bomb people randomly. They target places and things that are linked with the US occupation. This includes the central government set up with the help of the US, which they consider to be an American puppet. This is all part of normal guerilla warfare.


3

The Taliban mostly bomb big cities they argue that the people in big cities are silence about the West invasion, and they deserve to be killed. For example Kabul, the capital gets bombed now almost daily. The second reason is the Taliban don't want to win the heart and mind of people they want to rule by fear and force which is what they did when they were ...


2

Another significant issue is that the US has recently entered negotiations with the Taliban. Obviously, the Taliban will want US troops to leave Afghanistan, and by withdrawing half of them unilaterally, the US gives up part of its negotiating capital and gets nothing in return.


1

Let us suppose that Afghanistan is backward and that the USA is advanced and, moreover, that the difference is about 300 years. The only way that the US could change Afghanistan in the way you suggest would take a continuous effort of 100 years. This would include the creation of an educated workforce of men and women, and the creation and establishment of ...


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