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21

Because trying to redraw the border would just start the next round of wars. Most ethnic groups overlap their neighbors -- especially when countries have large capitals or ports that attract people from all over the country. And even where ethnic groups have well-defined limits to the area they currently occupy, they often remember ancient times when they ...


21

Simple reason: precedent. If USA supports such a border rewrite, what's left for it to do when Mexicans in South-West decide to secede (or, in a less likely scenario, The South Rises Again :)? If Russia supports such a border rewrite, what's left for it to do when Chechnya, or Yakutia, or Tatarstan decide to secede? If China supports such a border ...


17

This isn't a definitive statement of what President Trump intended to say, or the original written content, but the White House transcript of the speech has apparently replaced "Nambia" with "Namibia".


16

Let's look at Wikipedia's characteristics of a failed state: A failed state is a state perceived as having failed at some of the basic conditions and responsibilities of a sovereign government. There is no general consensus on the definition of a failed state. The definition of a failed state according to the Fund for Peace is often used to characterize a ...


15

The reason for French military action now is that the carefully crafted French-led plan of action (train African troops to fight the Islamists, with France as trainers) got thrown out the window since said Islamists declined to oblige waiting on the French/UN timetable and launched a major 2-column advance on the South that threatened to net them a complete ...


12

What is happening The first step to find a solution is to understand what is happening. And here we have the first problem. I haven't seen any precise data on how many of the migrants are economical migrants and how many are actually refugees. But what seems to be a reasonable assumption is that in practical terms there behave like both groups. That is to ...


11

France apologised for the Sétif & Guelma massacre in 2005, which is the only accusation of french genocide in Algeria that I'm aware of, however even the largest estimate of the death toll sits at 45,000, not 2,000,000. From the article above: On February 2005, Hubert Colin de Verdière, France’s ambassador to Algeria, formally apologised for the ...


10

A market, a manufacturing base, a source of raw materials, and a network of allies Not everything that a country does is always defined by narrow self-interest. However a more economically developed Africa would be an expanded market for China to trade with. African countries are already major suppliers of raw materials. China would like to obtain these ...


10

After 2014, that is no longer the case (see @indigochild's answer for pre-2014 status); because ISIS practices what amounts to chattel slavery, on the continent of Asia. They buy and sell slaves and the slaves are considered property, which fits the chattel slavery definition.


8

All the talk about “arbitrary borders” obscures the real problem. It's the very notion of the nation-state and modern borders that are in a sense arbitrary and seldom map to the political and cultural realities of former colonies. And the nation state wasn't established painlessly in Europe either. At the end of the day, there isn't any “real” border that ...


8

The US lack of economic interest in Africa is probably a consequence of its lack of military interest, combined with lingering effects of the Monroe doctrine. For much of the 20th century after WW2 and the end of colonialism, the US #1 military interest was anti-communist, both against the Soviet Union and China. This led to the Vietnam and Korean wars, the ...


8

The 2018 CARI paper concludes that China is not a big source of distress overall for Africa. It does not exclude that it might be for some African countries. The BBC summarized an earlier iteration of that paper in this respect: In 2015, the China-Africa Research Initiative (CARI) at John Hopkins University identified 17 African countries with risky debt ...


6

I think this has more to do with economics than politics. Trade occurs because one country has something another country needs. The classic apples/oranges example of comparative advantage comes to mind. Thus, the likely answer is, Africa simply doesn't offer very much that the U.S. needs. As to why (and this is mere supposition), it makes sense that Afro-...


6

I think that there a few intermingled issues in this question: Chinese model - authoritarian government, more or less free economy (in their case especially considering safety net, while technically there are plenty of gov owned companies). Yes, this model tend to work, something similar worked well in Europe during industrial revolution or in Chile under ...


5

There are three theories of ethnic conflict, each of which provides a different expectation for Africa. These theories are summarized here (Williams, 2015). That article has many citations, so I won't repeat them all here. Each of the three theories below provides different expectations. The high level summary is: Primordialism suggests that the conflict ...


5

According to DW, which is arguably an European (German) source, but probably not very French enamoured: Guinea quit the CFA monetary zone in 1960, followed by Mali in 1962 and Madagascar and Mauritania in 1973. But their decision to leave put their currencies into such a tailspin that no one has been seriously tempted to follow their example since. ...


5

Australia reduced its number of illegal boat arrivals from 25,173 in 2012 to 0 in 2015. This is largely seen as a result of stricter policies regarding illegal immigration. The EU could presumably achieve similar results by adopting similar policies, i.e. by not allowing illegal immigrants to settle the European Union. https://www.aph.gov.au/...


5

What about looking at it through principal agent problem? From country perspective decision seems bad. However, from politician perspective the decision seems good: he may get some bribe or at least end up with a few companies that owe him a favour he leaves a nice legacy in form of some construction - it stimulates economy (so makes people happy), leaves ...


4

You can invoke history, generalities about French interests there and elsewhere, the risk of spillover, etc. or focus on immediate tactical causes and domestic politics in France. But there is a simpler, more direct answer: 75-80% of France's power is produced in nuclear power plants and a fourth of the fuel comes from Niger. Fuel imports are handled by a ...


4

Military aid There are different reasons. Some real, some merely stated (without being real), some believed to be real but not really correct. Global geopolitical. In Mali, an AQIM offshoot of Al Quaeda was trying to grab territory. After 2001 and Afghanistan, Western powers consider that a Bad Thing, when an Islamist organization (never mind Al Quaeda) ...


4

It's unclear to me why you're asking, given that the Guardian article you threw in to justify your claim contains the answer: senior officials privately used the word genocide within 16 days of the start of the killings, but chose not to do so public ally because the President had already decided not to intervene. A bit further, the article states: "...


4

Why are the protesters so sure that Bouteflika will be reelected? Because he was reelected the last three times and there were allegations of electoral fraud. Also, it's not a given that the protesters are sure about the results of the election. As reported, they largely protest to show their disapproval of the sitting president (Bouteflika is in a bad ...


4

What I won't discuss: I don't intend to write on all potential actions open to France. If you assume that even war is a plausible response, then you could mention an infinite number of other options. Wrong basic assumption: Your basic assumption The adoption of a new currency would really hurt France's financial power is wrong. Many people would perceive ...


3

Probably because of Somalia's internal troubles but also because of their disputes with Kenya. The proposed future federation basically coincides with the EAC (East African Community), and Somalia is not even a part of that yet, although some in Kenya suggest Somalia's membership to the EAC. According to that article, attempts in the 1960s to get Somalia ...


3

Proving a negative is impossible, but I don't think you will find chattel slavery anywhere else. A single counter-example would prove that chattel slavery still exists somewhere outside of Africa. However, after reading through the publications of several anti-slavery organizations I could only find the two examples you mentioned (Sudan and Mauritania). ...


2

Do not bomb the North African countries like Libya in the first place. And do not incite revolutions and civil wars there.


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