44

I think these countries are in fact approaching this as a problem that has an obvious solution, as you suggest. The issue lies, however, with convincing their populace to work these seasonal jobs, and the inherent nature of seasonal agricultural work. Firstly, the levels of unemployment are not necessarily going to be as bad as you might think, at least in ...


31

Farmers receive subsidies in many many countries around the world, including EU countries prior to the CAP, the US, or Switzerland. One justification that's commonly offered is that self-sufficiency is a strategic goal that requires state support. The original policy was also devised when Europe was just coming out of food rationing that lasted for a decade ...


29

According to Reuters, it's not the EU but companies: “It is not the European Commission that buys, but the industry, and traders who look for goods where they are the least expensive for their financial interests,” one European soybean trader said. Reuters also quotes a market reseacher saying that the statement is "largely symbolic", and that ...


22

There are significant efforts to recruit unemployed or underemployed locals for seasonal farm work. In many cases seasonal farm work is actually skilled work, at least if it is to be done quickly and correctly (i.e. pick only the ripe fruit, not all of it). While that can be learned, teaching requires formal or more likely informal instruction. It won't be ...


15

Many farmers do seem to recognise that there are climate-related effects (even if they don't name it as such), however, farmers don't always agree climate change is a result of human actions. The reason I think that's an important distinction is because if we're not the cause (link to myth) and it's not something we have influence on, then we don't need to ...


13

According to your sourced article, this would be facilitated using the Commodity Credit Corporation. This is an entity that was created in 1933 to help stabilize farm production income during the Great Depression. It is a wholly owned government corporation, with no actual staff. It is basically a financing entity that the USDA uses to funnel funds into ...


12

Not all of the so-called "CAP" has its primary goal of agricultural output. For example, in the UK there are large areas of land where the weather and soil conditions are only suitable for low-intensity sheep farming. However grazing sheep have been a part of the stable ecosystem of these areas for centuries, and removing them because they are "uneconomic" ...


11

Lower Salary requests: Seasonal workers at the end of the season might go back to their country where there's a lower cost of living (at least for now). Furthermore, if they have to support a family, or save to buy a home, it is probably still at the prices of the country of origin, and therefore they are probably willing to accept lower salaries. Lack of ...


9

First of all, Winfried Kretschmann, minister-president of Baden-Württemberg, isn't really a typical representative of the Green party. He belongs to the Green-Conservative wing of the party which combines green policies with economic liberalism. This wing generally tries to find a balance between environmentalist concerns and economic concerns. Now about ...


8

Confirmation basically from perhaps a less biased source The catch is that is only pillar 1 subsidies (100% EU budget contribs), there are also pillar 2 CAP subsidies (50/50 split with the national budgets), not included in that graph. But this is most of the money: For the Multiannual Financial Framework 2014-2020, the CAP amounts to 408.31 bn. € (circa ...


8

It's hard to be impartial in defining the advantages and disadvantages of the CAP, since it involves making a value judgement of what it's "for". However, the current implementation makes especially large payments to countries like France and Spain, which are big but have relatively low population density, since it is principally based on the land area of ...


7

I would dispute all the premises of the question. Until now, there are no unprecedented levels of unemployment due to COVID19-related measures across the Western world. The only country where I have heard that the lockdowns resulted in immediate massive unemployment is the US. By contrast, many European countries had higher level of unemployment (as defined,...


7

There's generally two types of food waste: (almost) at the point of consumption and before that. In richer countries large amounts of losses happen at the point of consumption or just before that, for example consumers, supermarkets and restaurants throwing excess (but otherwise good) food away. In poorer countries most loss occurs in the supply chain (...


6

It required drilling down into these articles several layers (about 12) to find the relevant information. First, the issue they complain about above only applies if the repair is with the computer itself. If the issue is mechanical, you're more than welcome to fix it, or have someone else fix it. John Deere is claiming that to "hack" the software locks ...


6

Farmers were severely affected by this demonetization as indicated by this paper that thoroughly covers the subject: Farmers, who are the backbone of our (Indian) national economy, were severely affected by the note demonetization of which invalidated 86% of India’s currency. Most of them will get loans from cooperative banks which now don’t have ...


6

Well, first of all, a far more effective solution would be to send low-risk incarcerated offenders out into the fields. This would help to reduce overcrowding in incarcerated populations (lowering the transmission rate of Covid-19 there), could be easily justified as part of the prisoners' reparations to society, and rewarded with reduced sentences or ...


5

This question's premise is fundamentally flawed because it ignores a simple fact about agricultural work: Local workers don't want to do it. The reasons behind this are numerous, but the primary two are: Agricultural work is seen as being "below" locals' social status. Agricultural work is seen as disproportionately difficult for the remuneration provided....


5

Whereas one would expect farmers to notice changes in climate locally, it doesn’t follow that they are well placed to judge whether there is a broader pattern and whether the change is due to natural processes or due to anthropogenic change. As rural areas tend to be conservative, one would expect, if all things are equal, that farmers would tend to favour ...


4

can the EU Commission force or otherwise obligate companies to purchase US soybeans instead of their existing non-US suppliers. Not directly, but it doesn't need to anyway. Here's why: Since China retaliated against US tariffs, the price of US Soya has fallen steeply. China now buys soya from Brazil. The price of Brazilian Soya has consequently risen. EU ...


3

On top of all the other reasons, employers don't like to hire in regular positions people who took "nonstandard"/gig jobs. So, if you're a receptionist but suddenly you put farm work on your CV, you may have trouble finding employment later on anything else but temp farm jobs. Of course, these habits (of the employers) can change, but there's a ...


3

New Jersey Senator Cory Booker is opposed to legislative attempts to limit vegetarian substitutes for meat or dairy: I think that corporate power shouldn’t be snuffing out competition. This why I’ve been standing up. And we shouldn’t be trying to hurt industries—whether it’s the almond milk industry, dairy industry, or Veganaise or Just Mayo which has ...


3

Weather Farm products are heavily dependent on factors like weather. Good weather and there is a bumper crop. Bad weather and there is a shortage. Farm subsidies help make sure that there isn't a shortage and help manage bumper crops by buying the excess. My grandfather, who grew up on a farm, had a dim view of farm subsidies. What he remembered was ...


2

One at least plausible reason for the subsidies is national defence. If America imports food from potentially belligerent countries, then there could be serious loss of life if the country cut off trade abruptly. This doesn't really hold up to scrutiny when we consider just how far above 'what America needs to survive' the government has decided to subsidize ...


2

Another problem seems to be that supermarkets drive food waste as this report shows...and offers some great longer-term solutions. But in the short-term, the government could choose to support small farmers in getting people to work on their farms e.g. with the skilled Romanian workers managing teams of less-skilled British workers on farms who would in ...


1

The total figure over two years is indeed $28B: At Trump’s direction, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has rolled out $28 billion in trade aid for farmers over the past two years - $12 billion last year and another $16 billion announced this July and being disbursed now. There were also some changes in the program's structure from the first year to the ...


1

From an organised lobbying point of view, there do not appear to be any active "Vegan Lobby" organisations promoting plant based alternatives to meat in the US. This New Republic Article lists the number of formal lobbyist for the meat and dairy industries, but says there are no equivalents for the The Vegan Trade Council. A lobby, by definition, ...


1

The Common Agriculture Policy (CAP) is not a single programme on its own but a collection of several different programmes dealing with agriculture and rural development. Notice that when you ask for concrete policies you're not asking for legislation but strategy (Policy): A policy is a deliberate system of principles to guide decisions and achieve ...


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