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33

From a brief google search, it seems that alcohol is banned from 2-5 in an effort to prevent school children from buying liquor. I assume this is a question of supervision, where children are let out of school around 2, but parents are still working until 5, but I can't be certain since I don't live in Thailand. Interestingly, Thailand also bans alcohol ...


22

To prevent all-day drinking. Similar laws existed in other countries, in particular the UK. They were introduced in 1914 as part of the war effort. Afternoon sales were banned from 3pm to 6:30. They were repealed in 1988 in the UK, but many pubs continue to close in the afternoon (for commercial reasons). The Thai legal system is influenced by the ...


22

Prohibition did not come about because people were seeking to ban anything and decided to select alcohol. Rather, prohibition was the culmination of a temperance movement that had developed in the US for decades. People had been seeking to ban alcohol for well over a century because its use was widespread and so were its effects. No other substance came ...


20

The "frame challenge" aspect of this answer is to note that, while the USA is stricter than many European countries, it is less strict than many other countries. Many majority Muslim countries ban alcohol outright, or put far greater limits on its sale than the USA. However drinking culture is more restricted in the USA than in Europe. The age at which you ...


19

Alcohol was banned by Congress through Amendment 18 in 1917 because of Protestant protest groups and grassroot campaigns from several Woman's Rights Movement organizations. The Wikipedia article sums everything up fairly well. LSD was discovered by a man named Albert Hofmann in 1938, so it came afterwards. Extasy was invented in 1914 in Germany, so America ...


8

The higher minimum legal age for alcohol use in the United States is tied directly into the low minimum driving ages. The U.S. has the largest population of the Western World, and is fairly rural outside of the coastal regions (even then, some coastal states are not that densely populated). This creates the need for lower minimum driving ages in these ...


7

The Chancellor is allowed to do this as a matter of tradition, as the OP's link says. There's also a practical reason: the Budget speech is often long and complex, and a boost to their morale during the process is reasonable. Many of the details of operation of the UK parliament are traditions, rather than written rules. The tradition goes back to at least ...


5

Cocaine and heroin became illegal in 1915. LSD and XTC did not exist, at least not as something used recreationally. The main reason that they chose alcohol over other drugs was how widespread its use was. Virtually everyone knew of at least one drunk. The number of dope fiends was far smaller and after all, those drugs were often already illegal. ...


4

If you look at the tables (rather than the map) in the Legal drinking age Wikipedia article, you will notice that many countries actually have restrictions on purchasing alcohol or serving it to under-18 but technically no “drinking age”. It's foolish to think that simply banning a behaviour will make it disappear, that's not how policy is made. On the other ...


3

The main motivation that states have for making importing of liquor from out of state illegal, both for commercial re-sellers and for individual consumers, is protectionism. Consumers buying and bringing liquor from out of state would also be avoiding in-state liquor taxes. The last time (until this time) SCOTUS took up the issue of whether a liquor ...


2

I challenge the premise of the question. If we go by a more detailed list, we find legal drinking age varies, and while it's often 18, lower ages aren't exactly rare. We get the same result if we look at a list of minimum driving ages, where we get the same picture of 18 being the most common, with plenty of countries that have a lower limit. The order ...


2

Restrictions like this are predicated on cultural beliefs about competence to make decisions. Age of consent is often set fairly low because historically 14-16 was a common age for people to marry and enter the workforce. That idea only started to lose traction in the 20th century, when public education extended effective parental control to 18, and a later ...


2

So there are two parts to the answer. First, why ban anything? At the time, women were just starting to see the possibilities of voting. At the time men created the laws, they approve them, they enforced them. Women had no part in it except to have to follow those laws. Now women were just starting to "get the vote". This was very important, as it meant ...


2

To build on a summary in Phoog's answer: Alcohol was considered the root cause of spousal abuse (the driving reason behing Women's temperance league). Almost everyone drank alcohol, for historical and hygienic reasons, making impact of alcohol immeasurably higher. Saloons led to political corruption.


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