47

This topic is examined at quite some length in Ontario Law Reform Commission, Report on Political Activity, Public Comment and Disclosure by Crown Employees (1986) (cited by Mcmanus v Scott-Charlton which was cited in the judgement of the original case in question, which is how I ended up on it; I mention this lest one think that a Canadian document might ...


42

Sorry, I think you are out of luck here. NATO and EU are open to (constitutional) monarchies, for example Belgium is a member of both. The EU is restricted to democracies, and while there are no explicit requirements on government type for NATO, in practice, all members have been broadly capitalist and democratic. Both organisations have regional ...


35

The core concept here is procedural fairness—or rather, the appearance of procedural fairness. Procedural fairness involves whether impartial and open procedures are used when decisions affecting the well being of others are made. Is the decision-maker impartial? Is the game rigged? Procedural fairness is crucial for the health of a democracy ...


34

This is a pretty good article summarizing the reasons for monarchist support in Australia. Allow me to pull out some quotes: The Royal family do lots of work for charity, and their high profile means they can bring media attention to important issues. For a lot of people having a Royal family is fun, people like reading about them in magazines, and in ...


17

As is often the case, the answer is Yes and No. Specifically yes in some ways, and no in others. The chief place where parliamentary systems win out over the separately elected executive branch (at least in terms of preventing a government shutdown) is that the government (i.e. executive) is chosen by the legislative body. This means there cannot be a long-...


11

What does 'robust political insult' mean? I read this as meaning that Australians are more plain speaking. From a list of Australian political insults Howard is an a-se-licker. He went over there, kissed some bums, and got patted on the head. Australian politician Mark Latham made this comment about fellow politician John Howard. Contrast that with ...


10

Your understanding is deeply incorrect. Australia has had a separate access to the Crown since 1901, when the unique relationship between the Crown and the Constitution of Australia was formed. This relationship was furthered by the acceptance of the Statute of Westminster in 1942 and the Australia Acts in 1986. Currently Australia is governed by the ...


9

It's important to remember that the question asked in the 1999 Referendum was whether we approved of the proposed republican model and not whether we wanted to become a republic or not. Even Queen Elizabeth understood that the result of that referendum was voting against the Turnbull/Howard model, which was only selected at the Constitutional Convention as ...


9

As noted clearly in the Wikipedia article about Section 51(xxvi) of the Australian constitution, the purpose of the section was within the broader enumeration of federal powers, to allow the commonwealth to discriminate against everyone except Aboriginal (and thus presumedly Torres Strait Islander) peoples. This of course meant that the power to ...


9

Because it is already an issue. Visa Overstayers However, an estimated 86,940 people who entered Australia in 2017–18 breached their visa conditions. Many of them quickly left the country, but as of 30 June 2017, there were 62,900 unlawful non-citizens residing in Australia—a number that has remained roughly constant over the past few years. 50% of ...


8

The selection of the Prime Minister is subject to provision 64 of the Australian Constitution: The Governor-General may appoint officers to administer such departments of State of the Commonwealth as the Governor-General in Council may establish. Such officers shall hold office during the pleasure of the Governor-General. They shall be members ...


8

All right, I'll bite: see Retrospective laws breach separation of powers. Summary A bill of attainder is an obvious breach of the separation of powers. A retrospective law creating criminal liability is tantamount to a bill of attainder. Furthermore, because a judicial finding of law is retrospective to the last relevant legislative change, a legislative ...


8

The Queen of Australia, i.e. Elizabeth II. The Commonwealth realms have the same monarch and the same line of succession, but as a legal matter they are separate monarchies of separate and independent countries. Elizabeth II's title as Queen of Australia is not a result of her title as Queen of the UK. This can be seen in some articles of Australian ...


8

The official message of the Turnbull government is that the “Pacific solution” is intended to discourage the dangerous passage by sea and undermine criminal networks making money out of it. In that context, it makes sense to provide an alternative. The message is “don't waste money on a risky passage, go through the legal route instead”. On the flip side, it'...


8

Since you asked "how were they unaware", the answer is surprisingly simple. A lot of people simply don't know (and largely don't care) about being technically a dual citizen. Heck, I might theoretically be a Russian citizen (as an immigrant from fUSSR), but absent a practical need to ensure that I'm not, I won't ever bother checking - it literally seems ...


8

The comparison with the US isn't very contructive because they're very different countries (e.g. Americans are much more religious, and there isn't a powerful, organised evangelical lobby in Australia). Most Australians are more sympathetic to Palestine than Israel (Roy Morgan/APAN survey). Australian Jews are generally sympathetic to Israel, even though ...


7

The only powers reserved to the governors general, and hence the monarch, are constitutional safeguards (which may or may not be applied correctly). Since this role plus vague symbolism is about the only way that Australia could be considered "dependent" on Britain - most Australians are averse to giving these constitutional safeguards to politicians; who ...


7

Nope. We have the safety valve of a Double Dissolution. :-) Basically a mechanism exists to boot them all to an early election if they can't perform the basic function of a government.


7

Firstly, it's not always the case that we have an odd number of MPs - while in some states/territories the number of MPs is fixed by legislation, in the Commonwealth House of Representatives, the number of MPs depends on the distribution of the population - at present, it's 150, which is of course an even number. (source) Thus, appointing an outside Speaker ...


7

Looking at that link, it looks like the "coalition" of the Liberal Party includes other parties. Wikipedia says The main members of the Coalition at the federal level are the Liberal Party of Australia and the National Party of Australia. The Country Liberal Party of the Northern Territory participates through its affiliation with the Nationals (though ...


7

Regardless of the actual voting patterns in this case, any voting system in which individual members are all elected from a single geographical region, as is used in the Australian House of Representatives can easily have the party with most seats (and perhaps an overall majority/plurality) not be the party which received most votes. To reduce this to the ...


7

The AEC is headed by a Commission consisting of three people appointed by the Special Minister of State: a chairperson, who must be a current or retired judge of the Federal Court selected from a list of three nominees given by the Chief Justice of the Federal Court a non-judicial member, who is almost always the Australian Statistician (the head of the ...


7

Props are "tolerated but not encouraged" according to the House of representatives Powers and Practices That site notes that several props have been ruled unparliamentary: Scorecards following a member's speech, signs showing unparliamentary language, and petrol cans have all been ruled to be unacceptable. It is also forbidden to display weapons, though ...


6

From the Current Ministry List on the Australian Parliament House website: Assistant Minister for Immigration and Border Protection Minister Assisting the Prime Minister for Women Senator the Hon Michaelia Cash The capitalisation in that title — Prime Minister for Women — suggests, unfortunately, that it's not a matter of her assisting him on behalf ...


6

This is not limited to Australia, but rather a by-product of any legislature whose members are selected through plurality voting (a/k/a winner takes all). The phenomena is called Duverger's Law. To summarise the process: Everyone has nuanced life experiences and separate subtle opinions on law and policy. In the absence of direct democracy, these ...


6

Australia gets economic benefits inherent with hosting a military base Even the opponents of the base (Australian Green Party) admit that: The economic benefits of military bases include employment for local contractors and suppliers. military benefits of both joint training exercises better security, especially in light of much stronger Chinese ...


6

The Australian Labor Party uses this spelling because, in 1912, an American-born Australian politician King O'Malley made a successful case to have the spelling 'modernised' to the way that the Americans spelt it. Some other Australian politicians just wanted to have the name distinguish from the worldwide labour movement, hence the change.


6

It's debatable whether you can call GetUp a grassroots organisation, but whatever. Anyway, right-wing organisations with the same goals of social change exist in Australia, but what they don't do is try to appeal to young people. Instead, they create political parties, like Family First or One Nation. They probably assume that they'd get their policies ...


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