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93

Mail-in voting and provisional ballots: In many states, mail-in votes are allowed to arrive well after election day, provided they are postmarked on or before election day. Voters who cast a provisional ballot on or before election day are also given an opportunity to "cure" it. In practice, this usually consists of going to the county registrar ...


54

The Butterfly Ballot 2000 Presidential Election in Palm Beach, Florida In the 2000 election, Palm Beach County was using a hole-punch voting machine with a single column of holes. Hole-punch ballots are inherently error-prone in multiple ways, but this was compounded by a layout design error. Most offices had 2-5 candidates; the names could all fit on one ...


40

It doesn't need to be fast While the popular vote is important, the electoral college will "meet" in mid-December to decide the winner. There is no pressing need within the system to determine the results of all 55 portions before that point. There's more than a month before the popular election results need to be finalized and that's why states ...


36

In the 2007 Scottish Parliament elections, which operates under the Additional Members System (AMS), the ballots for the regional and constituency votes were combined onto one piece of paper, as below. This marked a change from the previous elections in 2003, where the ballots were split onto separate pieces of paper. Many voters were confused by this new ...


35

The Brennan Center for Justice has done some work on this exact question. Their full article can be found here, but I'll list a few of the examples they've gathered. In 2018, Broward County, Florida printed a ballot question at the bottom of a column that consisted mostly of instructions in multiple languages. The senate race (which was one of the affected ...


23

It actually isn't laborious. U.K. observers have to realize several things first of all: Using Sunderland as an example is stacking the deck. Sunderland isn't even a fair comparison to most ballot counting in the rest of the United Kingdom, which takes several hours overnight to well into the next day in most Parliamentary constituencies. Where "...


18

There are technical reasons for this detailed well in Kevin's answer, but there's an undergirding philosophical position that provides an essential context to questions like this: We're talking about the United States of America. Back in ye olden times 13 relatively autonomous polities decided to form a union to promote their collective interests and they ...


13

That depends on the laws in each state. In some states mail in ballots can be counted as they come in but in others they can't be counted until the polls close. I have included a couple of states for reference but the article lists what is expected in all 50 states and the District of Columbia https://projects.fivethirtyeight.com/election-results-timing/ ...


12

In addition to what many said here already, some points: the 'huge' numbers of votes to be counted should not make any difference. All related tasks could be easily parallelized basically, every location has a different reason for being slow, often prescribed by century-old laws, processes, or rituals any changes towards faster and / or easier processes hit ...


10

Yes - according to the California Secretary of State's website: What does a recall ballot look like? The September 14, 2021, California Gubernatorial Recall Election ballot will have two parts. There will be a recall question presented on the ballot: “Shall GAVIN NEWSOM be recalled (removed) from the office of Governor? Following that recall question, all ...


6

For federal elections, records must be retained for twenty-two months. Otherwise, state law applies. 52 U.S. Code § 20701 - Retention and preservation of records and papers by officers of elections; deposit with custodian; penalty for violation, Every officer of election shall retain and preserve, for a period of twenty-two months from the date of any ...


5

In Australia, the senate elections have been counted electronically for quite some time, with the software having existed in some form since at least 2003 (see the submission linked in the annotation) and said precursor was used for the 2004 election. [2] It is also used for commercial vote counting services provided by the AEC. [3][4] A video series "...


4

This is a somewhat tentative answer because voting secrecy is alas a matter of degree (FYI: as of 2015 at least, Sweden still had vote-organization rules that resemble those in Germany or the USA from more than 100 years ago, meaning party-identifiable ballots.) Wikipedia suggests that the 1993 presidential election in Nigeria used a system that counts as &...


4

Everyone who is not DEM or GOP, including a choice of “none of these”. Look for example at some of the State Assembly where there is no gray, and click on “show details.” Those with no gray have only two candidates and no one voted for “none of these” (or not enough to make it visible). (Note: Some have only a Republican and an IAP, so there is red and green ...


3

Another point that I don't believe has been mentioned yet is again with regards to mail in voting: When does the counting of votes start? In the UK, the process of checking and counting of postal ballots starts as soon as they start arriving. Local authorities have teams of people, mostly made up of council staff, waiting to begin counting mail in ballots. ...


3

No, all ballots in those countries are still counted by hand. While machines are getting better at being able to recognise written numbers, they're by no means perfect yet (and not yet better than humans at it).


3

There's probably no such database freely available, although as you noted some media organizations have gathered the updates... and e.g. 538 has produced timeline graphs such as these based on those data sets. I don't know if e.g. ABC and/or Edison Research charge for access to such data. Your best bet is probably to contact them and inquire on the ...


3

I work as a precinct election official in Ohio. The stub is there for in-person voting, and ONLY to be removed by the voter just prior to feeding the ballot into the optical scanner (where the ballot is tabulated and stored in a internal memory drive). The stub is collected by a precinct official and put into a envelope ("Stub A Envelope"). That ...


2

In some locales, you are allowed to vote in person even if you mailed a ballot in. (And even where this isn't officially permitted, a voter may show up in person to vote and dispute that they voted by mail even though a mailed ballot in their name was received.1) In such cases, the mailed ballot needs to be found and removed from the count. That's only ...


2

This is not special to your question about Wisconsin, but in general, absentee or mail-in ballots are typically to be rejected if a) they arrive late, i.e., after a threshold date determined from the last valid vote submission date and the typical mail delivery time plus some safety margin; this may vary with legislation, e.g., it may be a few days after ...


2

It's worth digging in on the implications of mail-in voting a little bit. Other answers have already noted two things: Ballots can arrive in the mail after election day—depending on state law, these may or may not be counted, as the deadline varies The date the counting of mailed ballots starts depends on state law too. In this election, Republicans in ...


2

Because these Northern constituencies were (historically) extremely safe Labour seats where, as British political types say, "they weigh the Labour vote". They are also very geographically small urban centres where the physical process of collecting votes is very easy. So it's physically very easy to count the votes, and it is highly unlikely that ...


2

Silly example, but in North Korea there are separate lines for those that want to vote for the current leader, and those that want to vote for someone else.


1

In the Swiss canton of Glarus, as of 2020¹, cantonal affairs are still decided by the Landsgemeinde. This is a general assembly that gathers every year since 1387. All men above age 16 (and since 1971 also women) who have active suffrage gather in the town square to decide on matters. All have the right to speak and vote. Since voting happens by raising ...


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