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86

It's not clear to me that Democrats are opposed to border-wall construction (your one source suggests they are fine with border walls/fences where necessary), so much as they opposed to some of the plans for full-border walls that have been put forth so far. Recently, in response to reports that the spending bill would include funding for a border wall, 5 ...


50

Here are the Democratic Presidential Candidates that definitely support repealing section 1325: Bernie Sanders: His website says “As president, Bernie will [r]epeal 8 U.S. Code Section 1325, putting border crossings on par with other forms of immigration violations, such as overstaying a visa.” Elizabeth Warren: Warren has long supported repealing section ...


46

There is indeed a small patch of land between Egypt and Sudan not claimed by any country: Bir Tawil. It is essentially a patch of desert in the middle of nowhere with no inhabitants, no infrastructure and no known natural resources. The reason is a border dispute between Egypt and Sudan about the nearby Hala'ib Triangle. The borders as stated by the two ...


43

New here, but there's a misconception in your question. The worry over the border isn't about some trade disputes and companies turning ugly over tariffs; this is about the establishment of any border at all between 2 regions of Ireland. I definitely can't go into all the details but here's a reference to the Wikipedia on The Troubles which is central to ...


36

The "border in the Irish Sea" refers to a regulatory border, namely a customs border, that would require customs inspections of vehicles traveling between Northern Ireland and rest of the United Kingdom. More specifically, it refers to a plan to have Northern Ireland be a separate customs territory from the rest of the UK so it can remain in the EU customs ...


35

On the border between Croatia and Serbia, near the border with Hungary, there's a small (7 km2), uninhabited area called Siga which is claimed by neither Croatia nor Serbia, though it's under control of Croatia. Like the case mentioned by Philipp, this is again a border dispute where the 'real deal' is about more (valuable) land and this small piece of land ...


35

It is essentially not allowed. States may not usurp the federal power over immigration. State attempts to regulate concurrently in a field already occupied by a federal statute have been struck down under the doctrine of preemption. In Hines v. Davidowitz (1941), for example, the Court held that the Federal Alien Registration Act preempted Pennsylvania ...


29

In addition to the issue David S identifies: Cost. Texas has a state budget that runs about $108B/year. Cost estimates for a border wall vary a lot, but the most recent request to Congress from the Office of Management and Budget works out to ~$24.4 million per mile. Even if the state decides it only needs a few hundred miles of wall construction (perhaps ...


29

I'm not sure the DUP has actually said something like that. Channel4 may have misinterpreted the following not-so-recent statement of Paul Girvan, MP for South Antrim and DUP transport spokesperson: As we leave the European Union, the DUP has been clear that there should be no border erected down the Irish Sea. Instead of placing barriers between parts of ...


28

For Irish Nationalists, the Irish state is composed of all 32 counties on the island of Ireland. The nationalist view is that 6 of these are currently occupied by the British (see Why don't Sinn Féin take their seats in the UK parliament?), while 26 are governed from Dublin. The legitimacy of the Dublin government is a point of contention among ...


28

Customs in French Guiana Yes, it is an external border for the purpose of EU common external customs tariffs. According to the EU's page on Territorial status of EU countries and certain territories It is a territory of the EU, EU customs rules do apply, EU VAT rules do not apply, and Excise rules do not apply either. The New York Times has an article ...


23

As a Democrat, here are some of my objections: Mexico is not paying for it. He promised they would; now he is demanding funds from Congress (tax-dollars). It is Impractical At estimates around $25 Million per mile, over extremely difficult and sensitive terrain, construction is impractical. A lot of the land is owned by private individuals and would have ...


23

Previous administrations, and the Trump administration until a few months ago, had a policy where only some people caught crossing the border illegally would be subjected to criminal prosecution (like people who were repeat offenders or who had a criminal record). Instead, most people just went through civil deportation proceedings. This changed a few ...


22

Simple reason: precedent. If USA supports such a border rewrite, what's left for it to do when Mexicans in South-West decide to secede (or, in a less likely scenario, The South Rises Again :)? If Russia supports such a border rewrite, what's left for it to do when Chechnya, or Yakutia, or Tatarstan decide to secede? If China supports such a border ...


22

It is not WTO rules which require a hard border, it is regulatory divergence. There will be a border in any scenario short of Irish unification. The Good Friday agreement says that it will be a soft border without intrusive limits and controls on cross-border traffic and commerce. Such a soft border is only practical if the rules on both sides of the ...


21

Because trying to redraw the border would just start the next round of wars. Most ethnic groups overlap their neighbors -- especially when countries have large capitals or ports that attract people from all over the country. And even where ethnic groups have well-defined limits to the area they currently occupy, they often remember ancient times when they ...


21

The UK and Ireland are both part of the EU Single Market and the Common Travel Area. Hence there is no excise duty on goods crossing the border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, and citizens of UK and the Republic are free to cross the border without stopping. Update: There is a difference in fuel duty between NI and the Republic, and ...


19

Both Glorfindel and Philipp give examples of unclaimed lands (Siga and Bir Tawil). These types of land are called "terra nullius" and are often sparsely populated and lack mineral resources. Today there are only three terrae nullius: Siga, Bir Tawil and Antarctica. Currently the only official terra nullius is Antarctica because the other two are claimed by ...


19

Through Her Majesty's Coastguard, the Maritime and Coastguard Agency operates some vessels that have radar. Its vessels range from rigid-hulled inflatable boats to five cutters it claims are operated on a 24 hour day, 365 days a year basis (although at times some of the cutters have not been available page 59). The MCA also operates some helicopters and ...


18

Precedent suggests that this would require Pennsylvania and New Jersey to consent, with the approval of Congress; Philadelphia would have absolutely no legal say in the matter, although it would be exceedingly unlikely that they would be kicked out without their consent. City Philadelphia's powers are those granted by its charter, which are those of local ...


18

No, there are no official borders between continents. There are several things to consider here in terms of what defines "continents": Cultural and ethnic matters, those purely on the "human" point of view Technical point of view, purely natural and geographical Politically, continental borders have, in some places, been arbitrarily decided without ...


17

Basically, modern border disputes are resolved by making a treaty and hoping for the best. As can be seen in the current Israel-Palestine conflict, modern border disputes are often hard to resolve. Historically, border disputes would often be solved by wars or coercion. Looking at Wikipedia's list of historical territory disputes, you can see that many ...


16

No. The campaign promise that Mexico would "pay for the wall" was in a very direct sense, with the idea that his strong background in deal-making would be brought to bear in showing Mexico the benefit of either having a wall, from their perspective, or not angering the US. A very oblique and indirect "we'll potentially have more money, and that pays for the ...


16

Regarding the updated question: Customs posts were regularly targeted by the IRA throughout the Troubles as they viewed them as symbolic of the division between Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic. [...] The Irish Prime Minister brought a copy of an Irish newspaper edition to the [EU-27] summit dinner to emphasise how far Northern Ireland and Ireland ...


15

There are two basic issues. Border controls would reverse a lot of the progress that has been made with the Good Friday Agreement. Aside from the economic problems it would cause (many people cross the border every day for work, not to mention goods and services), the border posts were often the targets of violence and terrorism and seen as divisive. Few ...


15

The UK and the Republic of Ireland have maintained the common travel area for nearly a century through a series of non-binding agreements. The most recent agreement, in 2011, was the first public one. It does not contain an explicit delegation of border authority, but makes it clear that the parties understand that they share responsibility for the common ...


14

Continents as geographic entities have little political importance. They are defined by geographers, not politicians. And geography is no exact science. Most continent borders are just based on consensus, and there is no clear one. Some geographer dispute that Europe and Asia are even different continents. Some consider them one Eurasian continent, other ...


14

The term "close the southern border" is quite broad and has many potential ramifications. Would such a directive apply to citizens? Legal residents? Commercial vehicles? Does he mean closing established ports of entry? Or, when he says "build a wall or close the southern border", does he actually mean the same thing? After all, building a border wall ...


14

Just because you don't have a fence on every piece of land that separates two countries doesn't make the border soft in the sense discussed in the context of Brexit. It might make it soft in some security (or Trump) dictionary, but that's another matter. As far as Brexit goes, a soft border has official crossings that look like in like this video; as in you'...


14

As said in the US constitution: Article IV, Section 3, Clause 1 of the US Constitution states: New States may be admitted by the Congress into this Union; but no new States shall be formed or erected within the Jurisdiction of any other State; nor any State be formed by the Junction of two or more States, or parts of States, without the Consent of the ...


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