72

It would seem a reasonable assumption that the Democratic-controlled California legislature would have implemented this system in order to help elect more Democrats. There are few things more consistent than politicians favoring changes that benefit their own political interests. However, both in California and Washington, a top-two system was put in place ...


46

Article II, Section 4 of the Constitution of California currently does not allow parolees to vote: The Legislature shall prohibit improper practices that affect elections and shall provide for the disqualification of electors while mentally incompetent or imprisoned or on parole for the conviction of a felony. Giving parolees the right to vote would ...


43

Source: Three Californias Federal The new states would have six Senators and fifty-nine electoral college votes while the current state only has two Senators and fifty-five electoral college votes. They don't mention it, but this would also allow the Ninth Circuit to be split. Currently it covers the largest population due almost entirely to ...


33

From your CNN link: The law bans state-funded or state-sponsored travel by employees of state agencies and departments as well as members of boards, authorities, and commissions. Note the critical words. This only applies to state employees using state funds or under state sponsorship in some way. They're just setting limitations on use of their ...


22

Why nonpartisan blanket primaries The seats where the Republicans do not have at least one candidate are generally the seats where the Republicans weren't going to win. Taking the example from the other answer, consider a seat where the Republicans only get 35% of the two party vote. The chances of that seat electing a Republican are minuscule. The last ...


19

The "We Are Still In" campaign is more of a statement than an agreement for concrete action or cooperation. From the press release that they issued, it's basically to "declare that we (they) will continue to support climate action to meet the Paris Agreement": The statement calls “The Trump administration’s announcement [one that] undermines a key pillar ...


18

Some basic facts If we look at previous years (using the dropdown menu in your link), we see that it used to be a lot less. The percentage of the budget allocated to health care over the years is: 2010: 23% 2011: 29% 2012: 27% 2013: 30% 2014: 33% 2015: ? 2016: 39% 2017: 43% 2018: 44% 2019: 45% 2020: 46%. In that, we see a clear increasing trend. Isn't ...


18

While I'm really not qualified to really answer the why (other than that a majority of California voters will accept these things), there are two factors that have made it possible. First is the sheer size of California and its economy. (If it were an independent country, it would be the 5th largest by GNP.) That makes it possible for California to impose ...


18

The California Citizens Redistricting Commission is responsible for redrawing the districts for representatives to Congress. Following the 2010 passage of California Proposition 20, the Voters First Act for Congress, the Commission was also assigned the responsibility of redrawing the state's U.S. congressional district boundaries following the ...


16

They can, and that's actually what they're doing, or at least trying to, here. The key issue is that the SFUSD board are elected officials, and the superintendent is selected by them, so the mayor and supervisors can't summarily fire them. Members of the San Francisco Unified Board of Education are elected at large to four-year terms on a staggered basis ...


15

You're getting confused in part because you're looking at the wrong number for independent voters. California lets you register as an independent, but it also lets you register as an American Independent and member of the American Independent Party (a far-right party that is famous for endorsing George Wallace's presidential campaign). People who aren't a ...


14

An official legal secession of a state from the union is unprecedented and has no formal procedure. So the short answer to your question is that they are making it up as they go along However, it doesn't really matter because based on previous Supreme Court precedent a state is not allowed to secede from the US. This was brought up a few years ago when ...


12

From Texas v. White: There was no place for reconsideration, or revocation, except through revolution, or through consent of the States. So if the other states consent, California could secede. Unfortunately, there is no definition of what it would mean for the other states to consent. A constitutional amendment could definitely settle this. However,...


11

Yes, in theory it's pretty easy to do (although, of course, as RCB's answer notes, it is illegal). Step 1: Registering to vote (by mail) According to California DMV, you can register to vote in Presidential elections in CA by mail, by following the process as noted (relevant parts bolded): Register by Mail If you prefer to register to vote by mail, you can: ...


11

From Wikipedia (citations removed and emphasis added) As of 2021, a recall ballot in California consists of two parts: whether the incumbent should be recalled, and a selection of replacement candidates in the event they are recalled. If a simple majority of those who cast ballots favors removing the incumbent by selecting "YES" on the first ...


10

Who are these people? Which demographics vote like that? Me for one. But more generally, many people under fifty see marijuana as easily available and find it silly for it to be illegal. Illegal marijuana makes criminals of many regular people who commit no other crimes. Also, legal marijuana produces tax revenue. And because drug dealers are ...


10

Article IV, Section 3, Clause 1 of the US Constitution: New States may be admitted by the Congress into this Union; but no new States shall be formed or erected within the Jurisdiction of any other State; nor any State be formed by the Junction of two or more States, or parts of States, without the Consent of the Legislatures of the States concerned as ...


10

The action makes sense - California is a hotbed of advanced technology design, China is well known for low cost manufacturing. All they have done is agree to jointly develop green tech. The only thing that doesn't make sense is associating this with Trump repudiating the Paris Accord, which was not a treaty, just a general agreement with no legal binding. ...


10

Yes - according to the California Secretary of State's website: What does a recall ballot look like? The September 14, 2021, California Gubernatorial Recall Election ballot will have two parts. There will be a recall question presented on the ballot: “Shall GAVIN NEWSOM be recalled (removed) from the office of Governor? Following that recall question, all ...


9

The ban covers using state funds to travel to other states. As UCLA recently proved, all you have to do is claim the funds came from non-state funds Late last year, UCLA announced it would not schedule any athletic contests in states with anti-LGBT laws. Earlier this year the State of California went a step further, banning all state-funded or state-...


9

Every state, including those that neither gain nor lose seats in the House of Representatives, is supposed to adjust their Congressional boundaries every ten years to accommodate population changes, per the US constitution. Many states see this as an opportunity for even more gerrymandering (or re-gerrymandering in the case that the state legislature ...


8

To answer the question that OP asked ("Can California ban its citizens from traveling to other states?"), which I should note is a purely hypothetical question (i.e. California has not actually attempted to do this, as explained in other answers), we can look to the Constitution. Article IV, Section 2 begins as follows: The Citizens of each State ...


8

There is no way for non-US citizens to legally vote in US federal elections, in California or anywhere else. From 18 USC 611: (a) It shall be unlawful for any alien to vote in any election held solely or in part for the purpose of electing a candidate for the office of President, Vice President, Presidential elector, Member of the Senate, Member of the ...


7

Summarised from comments According to documents published by the State of California Department of Justice, California started systematically collecting hate crime data in 1994. This is largely responsible for the spike in 1994. The decision to collect this data was prompted in part by the LA riots in 1992, the OJ Simpson trial, and other cases in which ...


7

However, shouldn't the state law simply override any non-conforming local law? It depends what you mean by "override". If the two conflict, the state law probably wins. But what about cases where they don't conflict? For example, if San Francisco has an $9 an hour minimum wage and the state has a $10 an hour minimum wage, complying with the state law ...


7

Comes down to when the California Democratic Primary is scheduled, Tuesday June 7 2016, and the number of delegates proffered by the primaries scheduled earlier. Before California's primary, just over 84% of the available delegates would have been won. From that, it is statistically possible that one candidate could have received a majority of all available ...


6

I mean, if I understand this correctly, only salaried workers will be paying this tax, while businesses (small or huge) won't. In the United States, payroll taxes are paid by employers. Employees never see that money and don't file it on their taxes unless they are self-employed. If self-employed, then they pay the tax as the employer of themselves. This ...


6

Quoted from Mike B's answer to a similar question asked on Law Stack Exchange: Section 11302 of the California Elections Code makes it crystal clear - as soon as an office becomes vacant, the recall election proceeds anyway, unless as of that moment there are not enough signatures to proceed to the vote. So the resignation tactic can only be used to stop a ...


5

Generally, the British common law doctrine of reception would apply here, even if not directly invoked (although most states used explicit language: e.g. chapter 2 of the West Virginia Code.) However, California is interesting because it did not do this. In ss. 20-23 of its Civil Code, it explicitly repealed everything before 1873 unless saved in the ...


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