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It firms up the base. If you are willing to put up a sign then you have "picked a side" and you are less likely to forget to vote. It helps canvassers. If you have a sign up, then canvassers know what to expect if they knock (This is a supporter, we only need to remind them to vote. This is an opposer, expect a hostile reception) It functions as a ...


52

While one can imagine an ideal world in which the political landscape is dominated by a "pull" paradigm (voters actively go out to find the information on the candidates), in the real world it's dominated by the "push" paradigm (voters passively receive information given to them). If you're asking why we can't have the first instead of the second, well, that'...


50

This is a bit of a phony question on several levels. To answer, they absolutely HAVE emphasized the healthcare cost savings. First of all, you claim that they focus on "increased healthcare spending," in the title, but then you talk about increased GOVERNMENT spending in the body of the question. In a system that is based on PRIVATE, FOR-PROFIT healthcare ...


47

Campaign rallies generate media attention. The media attention can gain votes for the candidate. Another issue is that campaigns don't necessarily need to gain supporters from the rallies. If the rally makes existing supporters more likely to vote, that also helps. You'll hear this referred to as turning out the base. Campaign rallies also might ...


47

Your question seems to be equivalent to: why don't Democrats start acting like (small-government) Republicans when it comes to healthcare? Because that's not their idea of healthcare, or rather it's not what their electorate wants/expects: (Some Democrats like Bill Curry even blame Obama for promising [in 2008] but eventually failing to deliver a federal ...


44

The United States system promotes a sharply divided two-party system. That's called Duverger's Law and like any such "laws" it is no ironclad automatism, merely a clearly observable trend. So anything which is bad for the others is automatically good for the own side. The disadvantage of being seen with smear tactics and of wasting the advertising ...


42

Skeptical answer One could give a skeptic's answer for any form of this question in the context of a political campaign: presumably the candidates feel this answer will be more likely to get them nominated by their party in their campaign for President of the United States. However, although this position is not made explicit, it is consistent with the idea ...


41

Nothing (Legally) Regardless of the circumstances of the referendum, the (legal) basis for Brexit is the European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Act 2017. I will add it in its full form so we can discuss all of the intricate details: Preamble An Act to confer power on the Prime Minister to notify, under Article 50(2) of the Treaty on European Union, ...


36

Hiring and firing top employees in federal government Right, subject to the approval of the Senate, the President appoints the cabinet. So, yes, the President has limited direct contact with employees of federal agencies. But they can legitimately campaign based on whatever powers are legislated to federal agencies, and whatever discretion those agencies ...


31

The joke is referencing Sanders fundraising strategy. His campaign targeted small donors, and managed to raise an unprecedented amount from online contributions. 27$ is a reference to the average online donation in January, a month when the money raised (~20mil) came almost exclusively from these online contributions.


26

First of all, it's a standard sales pitch/fundraising tactics. No different from "Buy this XYZ service ASAP while this wonderful offer is in effect" or "Urgently pounce on this while the supplies last!!!". Not really special to politics. It stems from basic psychology - people are more likely to commit to a choice if they see a deadline. Second, the ...


26

Currently, anyone spending less than 20% of their time engaged in lobbying can call themselves an "adviser" or "consultant". Trump says this a loophole that must be closed. I couldn't find anything on this specifically. 2.The Republican candidate wants a five-year ban preventing government officials who have recently departed the government from ...


25

Successful rallies achieve two key things: They reinforce existing supporters. At a rally the candidate has a platform where they can 'preach their good word' to their followers, and bask in the social energy of the event. Humans are social creatures, and we like to feel like we both belong to a group and that our views and ideas are supported by the ...


24

Direct things POTUS can do Among things you didn't mention: Legislate from executive seat. Signing statements, and especially executive orders. So far, SCOTUS didn't slap that down as violation of separation of powers. Determine how laws get interpreted and enforced. In many cases, that has very legislative-like effects, especially when Congress leaves ...


21

Q Is it something usual for the candidates to change their looks based on voters profile? That has to be called not unusual. This is an ancient practice. Not everyone does this, but it is a well established practice. On October 15, 1860, one image coach to Abraham Lincoln, Grace Bedell, told him to grow the famous beard, for well founded reasons: All ...


21

Most people, most of the time, think that things are pretty good, or at least tolerable, the way they are. As the US Declaration of Independence puts it "...all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed." The logical ...


20

From the transcript of the second night of the debate, we can see that both Biden and Buttigieg addressed this question. I'm not aware of any public statements from other candidates on this issue, but my suspicion is that they would likely agree with these points: BUTTIGIEG: Because our country is healthier when everybody is healthier. And remember, we’re ...


20

I think that the missing context is the nature and consequences of the cash bond system in the United States. That might not be a winning issue with the American public in general but that certainly is something the left wing of the Democratic party and African-American community would be sensitive to, even without necessarily condoning the violence and ...


19

Yes, the Trump Tower meeting is vastly different than normal opposition research. 1. The meeting might be a direct violation of campaign finance law Not everyone agrees, but there is an argument to be made that this was an offer from a foreign entity to contribute "something of value", which could violate US campaign finance law: “The Trump ...


19

I'm sure you've heard the term 'political momentum'. That is really a misnomer: what people mean by 'momentum' is a kind of growing social pressure for the campaign and candidate that pushes the candidate into the public consciousness. Political signage (though it seems archaic) is an important part of this pressure. It has two advantages: It allows ...


18

Has Donald Trump laid out a plan for this wall or ever talked about it with more detail to clarify what his ultimate plan and goal may be to build a wall? Trump is generally light on details. However, the wall is one of the stronger positions he has (in terms of describing a plan to accomplish it). He plans to tax/confiscate money sent from the United ...


18

The central tenet of the question is that the healthcare policies of Sanders and Warren are "mostly focused on increased government funding". This is a misrepresentation of both candidates' plans to move to single-payer healthcare. Both plans are called "Medicare-for-all" but include significant differences on how they'd be funded. Luckily the question here ...


17

Trump primarily appealed to his audience by stating what it wanted to hear. He said he'd 'drain the swamp' of all the lobbyists who had hurt the country’s working class. To the best of my knowledge, he didn't get much more specific than that except: He also said he would impose a lifetime ban on top executive administration staff from lobbying ‘on behalf of ...


17

By strict interpretations of this rule, you end up as an effective one-party state very quickly. What counts as "campaigning" is the big question. Firstly, a lot of places have ballot signature requirements - you have to get N people to sign a piece of paper in order to be a candidate. Does that count as "campaigning"? If so, then suddenly you can't have ...


16

I'm not even sure if the FBI was officially investigating the issue or not. Yes, the FBI was officially (and likely is) investigating the issue. James Comey confirmed that during a hearing before the House Intelligence Committee. The investigation is still on at the time he was dismissed from the FBI. Mr. Comey said the F.B.I. was “investigating the nature ...


16

Like you said, it's not a technique used only by politicians. It's something you see at many speaking events (at least in the United States). union rallies student protests press conferences Women's March Depending on the particular purpose of each event, the backdrop of people can mean different things. But here are a few purposes common to many of these ...


16

As a resident of a college town in Iowa, of presidential primary caucus fame, I have attended more than my fair share of political rallies. From my perspective as an audience member, there are a few things going on with the folks seated on the stage (obviously this answer is US-centric): First, remember that the live audience is often the main target of a ...


16

The way it often works is that a President doesn't travel explicitly for campaign purposes. The trip is often billed as official business. In other words, the trip would supposedly occur regardless of any political campaign or cause. The thinking then goes, "but hey, what the hell, while I'm there, let's do a fund-raiser with George Clooney" or &...


15

The donations you cite are made to the DNC, not to a Bernie SuperPac. He doesn't have one. They are for the purpose of obtaining special favors from the DNC: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Democratic_Congressional_Campaign_Committee Part of Sanders' agenda is to break this cycle of indebtedness so his historic donations are from people, not corporations. ...


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