New answers tagged

14

I cannot offer objectives, because they are not publicly known. What I can list are benefits - possible motivations. Serve as a distraction. The current administration has a history of using news to distract from (even) less favorable news. Contribute to a greater strategy of vilifying China as an enemy to rally against. Demonstrate strength and leadership ...


10

The objectives are very clear: lowering price for buying it. Just watch the dynamics: Trump declares ban on TikTok Microsoft "continue discussing" buying US part of TikTok. In some countries such chain of actions (threating, and then "offering a deal you cannot decline") can be called "raiding". It surely can be understand: ...


5

There's two parts to answering this question. The filing fee is a set value, as laid out in the chart on their official page. Given the valuation of Tik Tok is well in excess of $750,000,000, the filing fee would be a flat $300,000. However, this only is the requirement to get CFIUS to look at the transaction in the first place, which is a requirement of ...


2

YES you can be prosecuted. BUT you are largely safe if you limit yourself to go to places that have no extradition arrangements with China or Hong Kong, or those places that will likely reject a extradition request. Countries are perfectly allowed to prosecute slander, seditious speech, or lese-majeste, wherever they’re committed. A good example is Saudi ...


22

I can't speak for the motives of the administration, but the idea that TikTok is a national security risk is plausible. From location data alone, one can infer your political interests (do you go to the gun range? Are you attending BLM protests?), your religious affiliation (do you go to houses of worship?), and your hobbies/interests, and that alone (far ...


54

TikTok doesn't take just your location data, it also takes your clipboard. Everything you copy/paste while TikTok is open, even if it's only open in the background, is sent to their servers. So passwords, banking info, bitcoin addresses, anything at all that you might copy. This is not normal. This is why it is a national security risk. https://www....


33

An article in Wired took a look at this a few weeks ago. By and large, the experts agree with your assessment that TikTok in particular poses no special security risk and that a ban is not justified. Here's a key paragraph from the Wired piece. TikTok’s fiercest opponents argue that it should be viewed as a dangerous Trojan horse for Chinese Communist Party ...


25

This reflects similar situations applicable wrt other nations. A person wanted by the US authorities flew on a Canada-Mexico flight across the US. The aircraft was instructed to land en-route in the US and the passenger was removed. Israeli nationals who have any concern that they may be legally detained by countries who have extradition treaties with their &...


17

Countries do this all the time. Sometimes, they will claim universal jurisdiction for crimes they consider particularly heinous or crucial to their national security (think Julian Assange). Many jurisdiction will prosecute crimes like defamation based on the victim's location (the perpetrator's might not even be known initially). Some countries get some ...


39

It is quite common for countries to prosecute both actions by and against their nationals as soon as the perpetrator enters their jurisdiction. Some will also prosecute certain crimes by anyone who is presently in their jurisdiction, no matter where they happened. Some key points to take away: For some crimes (a citizen of country A murders a citizen of ...


66

How far applicable the law of a country is is decided by the law of that country. If other countries disagree, they can obviously decline to assist in the enforcement of those laws, and disallow the agents of the first country to act on their territory. There even is precedent that a country outlaws behaviour not related to it at all. For example, German law ...


3

Britain has taken action, but its options are limited by China's determination to assert greater control over Hong Kong. There is a strong political consensus in Britain across the political spectrum that China should respect its earlier commitment to "one country, two systems". In response, Boris Johnson has made it easier for Hong Kong citizens ...


1

https://www.justice.gov/file/22361/download The President has inherent constitutional power to declare foreign diplomatic personnel persona non grata and to expel them forcibly from the United States; the exercise of this power is consistent with international law, including specifically the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations. Inherent in the ...


3

Turkey claims Uighurs in China as ethnic Turks. In 2015 "Ankara summoned the Chinese ambassador... over reports that Beijing had banned Uighurs from fasting and worship during the holy month." In February 2019 Turkey's Ministry of Foreign Affairs issued a statement condemning the violations of "the fundamental human rights of Uighur Turks and ...


4

The following countries has officially expressed support to China's position: Algeria, Angola, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, the Plurinational State of Bolivia, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Comoros, the Congo, Cuba, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, ...


6

I would say part of the reason is also that Wuhan consulate is closed down and already evacuated, and I guess China wanted to revenge closing an open consulate as the one in texas used for spying on science stuff, where they were frantically burning hidden information upon closing in the backyard until the fire brigade came. According to the channel China ...


48

The US had five(now four) consulates in China: Chengdu, Guangzhou, Shanghai, Shenyang, Wuhan. The United States also has an embassy in Beijing. They all have their own consular/embassy district, just like this picture quoted from Wikipedia: You can see: Xinjiang is included in the Beijing consular district. Tibet is in Chengdu consular district. If Chengdu ...


5

We can look at whether Chengdu is similar to Houston in the relative prominence of the cities in their respective countries. Houston is the 4th or 5th largest city in the US and has 28-37% of the population of the largest city (New York), depending on whether we use city limits or metro area. Chengdu is the 7th largest city in China and has 34-40% of the ...


3

There is a 3rd reason. The largest Muslim ethnic group in China, the Hui, gets along well with the rest of the people. Hui has a population about 20 million, whereas Urghurs about 12 million. There are seldom reports like this, this and this, from the Hui Muslims. So it seems to make many Muslim country leaders to believe China does better than other ...


36

Without privileged diplomatic information, it's impossible to answer this question definitively. Diplomatic decisions of this sort are carefully weighed so that they appear as an equal response, not an escalation or capitulation, but no one outside the inner circles knows exactly what factors are being weighed in the decision. However, it is worth noting ...


8

It is too early to speculate on how this incident will play out but we don't have to look very far for a historical precedent. In 2018, the Russian consulate in Seattle was closed under rather similar circumstances. Sixty diplomats were accused of spying and given 7 days to leave the country. We don't know their identities but they presumably complied. Had ...


37

Doesn't China have to comply with this closure order? I'd say so. Per Vienna Convention on Consular Relations, of which China is a signatory: TERMINATION OF THE FUNCTIONS OF A MEMBER OF A CONSULAR POST The functions of a member of a consular post shall come to an end inter alia: (a) on notification by the sending State to the receiving State that his ...


13

The Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations govern the rules surrounding embassies and consulates around the world. For your question, Article 12 is the most relevant: The sending State may not, without the prior express consent of the receiving State, establish offices forming part of the mission in localities other than those in which the mission itself ...


-4

The answer is MAYBE. The "YES" answers rely on information from a single source: Adrian Zenz. A quick Google search reveals that Zenz is a Senior Fellow in China Studies at the Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation, Washington in D.C born-again Christian. Given the above, the objectivity and fairness of anything Zenz has to say about people ...


0

To add to bytebuster's answer, it seems that even China scholars fail to see a specific reason for timing, besides the obvious taking advantage of the pandemic crisis. The CCP surely knew there would be repercussions of the likes of US removing special status to Hong Kong, but the current situation might allow Chinese government and businesses to compensate ...


2

This question comes from an assumption that Chinese government acts on its own free will, "not needing anyone's permission". In fact, China is (and was, one year ago, and will be, 27 years after today) bound by its Constitutional principle colloquially known as "One country, two systems" introduced by Deng Xiaoping. This principle is ...


1

Of course. How many countries is the U.S. currently sanctioning, for one reason or another? The Canadian mounties arrested Meng Wanzhou - the daughter of Huawei's CEO - on behalf of the U.S. government, which claims that she violated existing sanctions in doing business with Iran. Given the arrogance of the U.S. government, officials could probably sanction ...


4

A nation has the right not to trade with anybody they don't like. They even have the right not to trade with anybody who trades with anybody they don't like. No pretext is necessary, really. Passing such sanctions on a whim might run afoul of international trade treaties, but a nation has the right not to be a member of the WTO, or not to sign any bilateral ...


4

Uyghurs are a convenient scapegoat since they are mostly Muslims so they can easily tarred as terrorists and given how hard the CCP is pushing them with not just the internment camps but also the heaviest most intrusive surveillance in all of China and no doubt even more instigation many are bound to support Islamic extremists. The CCP considers everyone a ...


2

In my opinion, no they won't be punished and to some extent, they CANNOT be punished at this point. They started out with small violations that went unnoticed and have now made it to this but the thing to be noted here is that they now have more influence over the world and punishing them isn't as easy as it would've been years ago. Indeed the tribunal ruled ...


0

The simple and straightforward answer is that modern institutionalized forms of democracy are perfectly viable in a nation with a large population, even a population as large as China's. However, there are a number of different issues to discuss to get to that conclusion, so please bear with me. First, we should go back to Aristotle's distinction between ...


6

This move is akin to saying that any citizen of Hong Kong has the right to claim refuge from the Chinese government. Of course they're not calling the people actual refugees as that would involve lots more international law (and the Australian government doesn't have a good relationship with refugees in general...) but the insult is the same: Australia and ...


25

China is actively terminating the future of an ethnic minority: The Chinese government is taking draconian measures to slash birth rates among Uighurs and other minorities as part of a sweeping campaign to curb its Muslim population, even as it encourages some of the country’s Han majority to have more children. While individual women have spoken out before ...


0

Because the Uyghurs are one of the largest, non-han chinese minorities, and therefore they pose a threat to the increasingly fascistic and pro-han CCP, and coincidentally, a perfect scapegoat.


62

Genocide Defined The Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (the international law defining the crime of genocide) says that genocide is: In the present Convention, genocide means any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group, as such: (a) ...


0

Short answer; As any skillful politician from any country: For political gain. Once in office in Chongqing, he seemed to have sensed the anger of China's old and new left that were angry and Deng's turn towards free market, and it's unclear position on Mao's policies. This was a movement gaining more and more traction, especially among rural left-behind ...


24

I think the other-ness (Muslim) and Soviet-backed separatist movements play a role in why Uyghur people specifically are targeted. Though as the other answer points out, this had previously been happening with other ethnic groups (and still continues). But I wanted to make another point. There are roughly 11,191,500 Uyghur in the Xinjiang region. This is ...


48

The question you added in comments I think is more specifically interesting; We mostly know why the CCP does what it does in Xinjiang (GC Campbell comment), but following that logic, it would do the same in Tibet. The answer is they did! And the same Party member that was in charge of developing the surveilllance state and re-education camps in Tibet (Chen ...


2

An important point I think is each of those countries early transitions phases did not happen simultaneously which allowed Deng Xiaoping's led CCP to learn from the USSR's mistake throughout the years. To add to previous answers, an important bit on the sociological front was discussed in the new book from Jude Blanchette, China's New Red Guard. The Russian ...


1

Both China and Russia have gone through a period where ideology overruled the practical necessities in politics, and in both cases the consequences were sub-optimal, shall we say. The difference was in the way they transitioned that state of affairs - in Russia, Gorbachev tried to do the right things, but lost grip of the situation, and they tried to ...


7

70s China, under Mao, "economic development and industrialization" was a massive failure. Not until Deng Xiaoping did China start to take off and then only by relaxing Communist ideology and embracing some level of free enterprise: ""it doesn't matter whether a cat is black or white, if it catches mice it is a good cat." That's in ...


2

This is an ongoing and evolving situation but it does appear to be the case that Chinese forces have left the valley. As stated in the question, Indian media is reporting that Chinese forces have retreated and this is apparently supported with satellite photos. Eurasia Times says that "Chinese state media – the Global Times acknowledged that India and ...


6

What makes you think they don't? Putting aside the problem of how to define "debt trap diplomacy", China is only ranked fourth (after Japan, the US and Germany) in foreign direct investment (FDI) outflows as of 2019 according to the World Bank. So the US does out-compete China in that regard, investing in other countries at nearly triple the level ...


Top 50 recent answers are included