New answers tagged

2

Since Fauci is now part of the Biden administration... he reportedly said at a video conference on the 21st: In one of his first assignments as part of the Biden administration, Anthony Fauci took part in a videoconference on Thursday with the World Health Organization (WHO), praising the agency’s work in responding to the COVID-19 pandemic and reaffirming ...


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Yes, Article 63 Article 63 The National People’s Congress shall have the power to remove from office the following personnel: (1) the president and the vice president of the People’s Republic of China; ... So the annual NPC can remove the President, by simple majority vote. https://www.basiclaw.gov.hk/en/basiclawtext/images/basiclaw_full_text_en.pdf


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Some reasons why a CDBC (be it called "digital rouble" or more improperly "crypto-ruble") might not actually be that effective at bypassing US sanctions-- basically because simply using it will raise red flags and possibly attract US investigations and sanctions: the ability of a crypto-rouble to help Russia evade U.S. sanctions is ...


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You can't bypass the dollar without having a comparably sized economy that is not dependent on the dollar. There are two big main factors that make replacing the dollar difficult. The practical one is you need a market that has the same volume as the dollar, moving billions of dollars is trivial (for moving billions). Secondly you need a market independent ...


0

Because it's, obviously, a complex thing to do! But process of "dedollarization" is in progress. In fact, developing projects of digital-yuan and digital-rouble crypto-currencies are part of that work. EU is also partially edging from petrodollar. US sanctions are boosting those processes, because more and more countries realizing its vulnerability....


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TL;DR: Without going into the definition of "genocide" or a moral debate about China's dealings with Uighurs, I'm going to agree with @PhillS in saying that there's a good chance the labelling at this late hour is just another problem lobbed at the Biden/Harris administration. The timing is suspicious, since Pompeo put sanctions in place in July. ...


-1

In those times - shortly after the foundation of PRC in 1947, it was one of the closest ally of the USSR - as another socialist country. USSR helped China a lot, especially in development of PRC army - some of the Soviet weapon systems are still used. Since Khrushchev became a leader of the USSR (and followed change in ideology, moving USSR socializm closer ...


0

According to Mao: The Unknown Story by Chang and Halliday (quite partisan in its dislike of Mao), the USSR, post-Stalin, did not in fact see giving away the bomb as very beneficial. However, Mao was really persistent in wanting to acquire bomb capability and bribed the USSR generously with foodstuff, even while its people starved. The pursuit of the bomb, ...


53

The USA has signed (in 1948) and ratified (in 1988) the UN Convention on Genocide - one of the founding declarations of the UN in 1948. The convention commits its signatories to the following obligations (among others): Obligation not to commit genocide (Article I as interpreted by the ICJ) Obligation to prevent genocide (Article I) which, according to the ...


0

There are various incentives for governments to work in the interest of the people. Actually they are the same kinds of incentives like doing anything while cooperating with others. But before we start, why are they valid incentives? An election works because it is enforced. If we could enforce something random, that also happens to be good for the people, ...


2

Democratically elected politicians do not have any direct incentive to make choices that are good for the country. They have an incentive to make popular choices, which can mean making good choices (hard) and working to make them popular (easy), but the same level of support can be achieved by making poor choices (easy) and working to make them popular (hard)...


0

TL\DR: No WHY: China's governing body has significant incentive as they have 1.2 billion people (the US has 0.33 Billion). China's governing principles is perhaps best summarized in the Mandate of Heaven. The Mandate of Heaven does not require a legitimate ruler to be of noble birth but how well that person can rule, depending on the just and able ...


1

(I tried three times to write, this each time the length blew up because of the necessary examples and explanations and as you can see I failed yet a fourth time in this area. However, make no mistake, this is an answer. If you need more details or examples to justify the following arguments just let me know.) TL:DR - There aren't any (even with "fair&...


3

I would say no - but your question is hard to answer objectively. I think nearly all dictators have seen themselves as the good guys, who wanted to do what is best for 'the people', so subjectively, at least, they were driven by a sincere desire to do good. In some cases I think you will find that a dictator has actually managed to objectively improve ...


3

To the extent that "fair elections" include the possiblity of leaders being removed from power, it is a similar incentive for dictators to act in particular ways -- which just means doing what they can to avoid being taken out of power. It is at best wildly controversial to claim that China acts in the "interest of its people." Given it ...


10

As another answer already states, a possible incentive for a dictator/dictatorship to govern a country might well be the fear of a coup or revolution. However I think it is also the case that a lot of dictators just are not content with eating caviar everyday and living in a big fancy palace. They have a vision of what their country should be like. ...


50

The CCP is in a strange position. They are nominally Communist, but they've largely jettisoned its economic prescriptions (because they don't work). They're a one-party state (more or less dictatorial depending on your viewpoint). So they're in power but don't have Marxism to really fall back to as an ideology. They're also unable to rally people around a ...


3

Not really. There are other potential end games besides losing an election, such as a violent overthrow or a military coup. The last successful coup was in August this year in Mali, when the President dissolved Parliament and resigned after being captured by the military, and a military junta was installed to govern the country. I'm not going to get into ...


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