12

Mostly, because while it's doable (especially in small cities), it's hard to do. Todmorden in UK has done something similar, in having population grow produce that's free for picking - even the Bobbies (police) have a vegetable bed by the station. However, this is fraught with difficulties, both horticultural[1] AND political: Costs. Non-bearing year ...


11

You are mistaken about revenue collection systems for public transport (and many other technologies or indeed public services themselves). The Oyster card was one of the very first of these electronic pays-as-you-go systems (after Hong Kong's Octopus) and might have required significant R&D (I don't know) but most middle-size cities buy the technology (...


8

So why don't governments license their existing technical solutions to each other? Surely it would save a lot of money and headache? The assumption in this question that governments own the technical solutions that they use is the exception rather than the rule. Mostly, governments buy technological solutions from private businesses that are in the ...


7

The Europe Union, which is another example of the same, illustrates quite well why it's more convenient to have the executive and legislative branches of government in one place. The European Commission and the European Council, which are the executive branches, have their seats in Brussels. The European Parliament has its formal seat in Strasbourg. The ...


6

In a time when one of the fastest forms of communication was by horse, it would take a week to send a letter from Washington to New York. It could take three weeks to send a letter from Savannah to New York. So if the Supreme court was in Savannah, Congress was in the new Capitol of Washington, and the President was based in New York, then when the ...


6

Simple answer: that person needs to mean something to that country. A prime example of this would be the Ronald Reagan Monument in Warsaw, Poland Ronald Reagan was the President of the United States from 1981-1989. So why is there a monument to him in Poland? Well, Reagan is best known for his efforts to combat Communism in the Soviet Union. Poland, which ...


5

Seattle has laws mandating the planting and/or retention of trees when buildings are built. Its regulations strongly encourage the retention of trees that are very large, or large and unusual in Seattle. (There are exceptions that allow the removal of "hazardous" trees, and let individual homeowners remove a few "non-exceptional" trees per year.) Its ...


4

The party membership of executives is a common variable in political science. However, usually this is directed at either the national or sub-national unit level (in the U.S. sub-national units are states). For example, there is a plethora of scholarship which examines how Democrat or Republican presidencies have shaped the United States. A quick search ...


4

This is both broad and interesting question. According to Property Price Index 2017, London is indeed one of the most expensive when it comes to property prices and the most expensive in Europe. Unfortunately, high prices have several root causes, making hard to tackle this phenomenon (source): Growing demand - [...] demand for housing has been rising ...


4

Japan has a population of over 120 million, in an area of a little under 400000 km2. Compare this to California: an area of a little over 400000km2, and a population of 40 million. So imagine tripling the population of California. You need to build homes for all these people. You probably don't build in Yosemite or Trinity forest, because these areas are ...


3

I think general travel bans apply under this question, the most famous (arguably) example of which was provided by the good Gaius Julius Caesar for that Queen of Cities, Rome. Admittedly, while his policy was aimed at reducing overall traffic and not just tourism/inflow, I think the general principle applies that he enacted a policy to keep people from ...


2

There are couple of examples i can give from Turkey: Gold Mine project in Erzincan Thermal Power Plant projects in the city of Amasra, and Trakya region. Third Airport to Istanbul Most of these projects are still contested by the locals, but probably will be carried out. Most of the time the way to deal with locals is to promise them jobs in ...


2

The only real solution to NIMBYism is to move power from local towards national levels. Otherwise, you get... well... democracy. People want their political system to improve their own lives, and to represent their own interests. At a city or neighborhood level, increased development means higher density, more people, slower traffic, slower property ...


2

However, I am interested in the political factors/decisions that favored this kind of city developing An important political factor that influences how land use is regulated in Japan is that authority over land use regulation is largely at the national/regional level, rather than the local level as it is in the U.S. This makes "not in my backyard" (...


2

Japan on Wikipedia, stats: Area: 377,972 km^2 (145,936 sq mi) Population: 126,740,000 Density: 336/km^2 (870.2/sq mi) Compare to California: Area: 423,970 km^2 (163,696 sq mi) Population: 39,250,017 Density: 93/km^2 (240/sq mi) The United Kingdom: Area: 242,495 km^2 (93,628 sq mi) Population: 65,648,000 Density: 270.7/km^2 (701.1/sq mi) ...


1

"Obtain" is very much the wrong word - the naming is a free choice of the locals, and is not only not at the instigation of the country the name is coming from, but usually without their knowledge. Nelson Mandela also had a lot of things named after him, especially while he was in prison. This was a deliberate insult to the apartheit government of South ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible