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2

According to Michelle Alexander, a legal scholar and a civil rights litigator, one reason for sich a policy is to disenfranchise the black population. She claims it is a form of gerry-mandering by removing the black male population from the citizenry and into the ranks of the incarcerated. She makes this claim in her book, The New Jim Crow: Mass ...


1

Well, one good reason is that jailing might be used as a punitive measure out of all proportion to the offence. This is what Michelle Alexander implies in her book, The New Jim Crow, where she claims incarceration has become a tool in disenfranchising the black male population. She also points out that one current trends around a third of the black male ...


3

What is legally possible is irrelevant. Once the filibuster is removed there is no likelihood of a subsequent Senate, either Democrat or Republican trying to reinstate it. In 2013 the Demcrats removed the filibuster for Judicial appointments below the Supreme Court and Republicans objected. After becoming that majority party in 2016 no move to restore this ...


2

In theory, yes, if Republicans win a simple majority in both Houses of Congress as well as the presidency, they could then repeal this law with a simple majority. A repeal is just another law that says the previous law is no longer valid, and so the rules would be the same for it as for any other law. However, there is a wrinkle. The purpose of the voting ...


15

If the Democrats get rid of the filibuster to pass voting rights can the next congress repeal these voting rights with a simple majority? The next Congress? Probably not. The next Congress runs from January 2023 to January 2025, during which Biden will still be President. Even assuming the Republicans win both houses of the legislature, they'll need to have ...


4

Including the prior provided answer along with key commentary on this answer: It looks like the Democrats can get rid of the filibuster to pass voting rights. The next congress could repeal this law with a simple majority unless there is a presidential veto. This seems to indicate that voting rights would last at least until the next presidential election. ...


5

Yes, they can because that is how congress works, any bill passed by a simple majority can be repealed by a simple majority. All bills can be passed with a simple majority, the filibuster has nothing to do with passing a bill. It is just a procedure that is designed to hold up the vote on a bill by using debate. The problem is with the modern filibuster ...


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