50

No. While it is hard to prove a negative, wherever two people come into conflict, either the stronger will come to dominate the weaker, or both will defer to an even stronger power, ie a government. Consider the usual examples of anarchist societies such as The Paris Commune, Nestor Makhno's "free territory" all had systems of government. These might be "...


36

Iceland during the Icelandic Commonwealth period is itself one of the closest examples. For a lengthy period of time in the Middle Ages, it had an island-wide legislative/judicial body but not an executive branch. The legislative/judicial body would decree when laws were violated by someone to maintain basic honoring of contract, property and personal ...


24

Short Answer - no Slightly longer answer It is really dependent on your definition of anarchy. For most of human history, societies have been organised without the existence of a centralised bureaucracy. To quote Robert L. Carneiro from "Political Expansion as an Expression of the Principle of Competitive Exclusion" (1978) For 99.8 percent of human ...


17

Sharia law is a big and complex subject. A significant number of college students in Saudi Arabia and in Iran, for example, would have it has a college major and pursue graduate studies in it as well. This post focuses on some of the better known and most distinctive features of it from the perspective of an outsider. Needless to say, given the limitations ...


14

The UK has a GDP of $2.91 trillion (PPP). Japan has a GDP of $5.42 trillion. (source). The UK spends about 7% of the world's $1.36 trillion on pharma R&D, or about $95 billion. Japan spends 13%, or $177 billion. (source) So the UK spends 3.26% of GDP on pharma research. Japan spends 3.26% on pharma research. There is no significant difference in ...


13

Someone has to write the test. The United States, in particular, has a long and sordid history of imposing "literacy tests" on voters. These were used to disenfranchise ex-slaves (and black people more generally) after the civil war (and continuing on for a century thereafter). The general approach was to exempt white people from the test, while requiring ...


9

In the United Kingdom, the process for nominating a judge to the Supreme Court starts with the Court itself forming a commission, almost entirely made up of legal professionals (judges, barristers, etc.) Once the Commission has consulted those it is required to consult, it will make a recommendation to the Lord Chancellor (who is usually also the Secretary ...


9

Overview Have other countries with similar supreme courts found a way to reduce this polarization within the court? It turns out that this doesn't have a simple mechanical answer. Naively similar systems with common legal roots often work very differently in practice. And, there are quite a few factors that influence the outcome. In general, the ...


7

There is a body of work in anthropology that describes anarchist societies. One of the most famous works in this tradition is "Fragments of an Anarchist Anthropologist". Although the author is principally interested in a theoretical argument, he uses some case studies of the Tsimhety culture in Madagascar. Based on their population alone (about 700,000 - 1 ...


7

In the United States and most other countries in the British political tradition, you cast your vote for an individual and a party designation is just a helpful hint. And, of course, I know of no political system anywhere in which there is actually a legal obligation for elected officials to keep the promises that they make on the campaign trail - if there ...


7

TL;DR: In the modern world, NO. Not the way Shariah is used in many Islamic countries. First of all, you need to understand that most (like, 99+%) of "Torah laws" by definition only apply to Jews. As in, non-Jews are not in any way, shape or form are required or expected to follow them. The ONLY laws that non-Jews are meant to follow that are in the Torah ...


7

Short Answer Is government shutdown US specific? In a very narrow sense, yes. Other countries don't usually shutdown due to the failure of the parliament to approve a budget (for reasons discussed here). But, in a somewhat broader sense, similar things do happen elsewhere. There are somewhat analogous situations in other systems, such as the failure to ...


6

It's up to the voters. If the voters value knowledge of the constitution, candidates can use this as campaign material. If the voters don't care, why should there be a test?


5

Kowloon Walled City (KWC) aka the "City of Darkness" was a Chinese territory surrounded by British land. An article entitled Kowloon Walled City: A place of anarchy from the South China Morning Post describes it as a largely ungoverned, megablock of urban/architectural configuration. It's 6.4 acres had a population of over 50,000 when it was demolished, ...


5

Given South Africa's example, which has survived 25 years including orderly transitions of power (something few other regimes in Africa have managed) it is hard to see why it couldn't work. Switzerland also has a President who is a merged head of government and head of state who is not directly elected, and it is the paragon of stability, although the body ...


4

So basically, a Jeffersonian Democracy isn't a form of Democracy per se, but an organization of power within a Democracy. The United States is a Federation, which means it's something akin to a series of small nations or "States" that have ceded certain powers to a larger government body (The United States, for our purposes, the Federal government). States ...


4

The party membership of executives is a common variable in political science. However, usually this is directed at either the national or sub-national unit level (in the U.S. sub-national units are states). For example, there is a plethora of scholarship which examines how Democrat or Republican presidencies have shaped the United States. A quick search ...


4

Maybe. Etymology: The word anarchy comes from the ancient Greek ἀναρχία (anarchia), which combines ἀ (a), "not, without" and ἀρχή (arkhi), "ruler, leader, authority." Thus, the term refers to a person or society "without rulers" or "without leaders" If you understand it to mean "without rulers" or "without leaders" (rather than "without laws"), then ...


4

In Belgium Pairing is mentioned in the rules for the House of representatives. It's allowed, but stipulated that they should be disclosed before the start of a vote (absent reps are expected to have a good explanation for being absent, abstaining reps are expected to have an explanation for abstaining). It is explicitly mentioned in the same rules that a ...


4

In Denmark it is set 100% into system as a practical measure to allow politicians for participating in other events throughout the day. They are called clearing agreements, and here is a link to a danish wiki that hopefully gets translated for you if you don't read danish https://da.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clearingaftale


4

It's definitely not applicable to my home country (the Netherlands) for the simple reason that our electoral system has no provision for it. As we don't have a district based system, the 'tools of the trade' so to speak are simply not available. Gerrymandering is tied one on one to a district system, so no districts, no gerrymandering. Also, since there is ...


4

Thibaut et al. (1972) conducted a roleplaying experiment to test whether presenting evidence using an adversarial or inquisitorial system would influence bias. They found that the system used did not influence unbiased subjects, but that the adversarial system was effective in counteracting initial bias. Thibaut, John, Laurens Walker, and E. Allen Lind. ...


4

In Constitutional monarchies, similar to the UK system, the Head of State is the Monarch, and the Head of Government is the PM. But all constitutional actions of the Head of State are done only on the advice of her ministers, and the Prime Minister in particular. The means that the de facto position of the Prime Minister is to both command a majority in ...


3

This would have a negligible effect on the quality of governance. You are either testing knowledge that is easily available, or testing a skill that isn't required. If you are in a country which has a written constitution, then knowing what the constitution says isn't difficult. Memorising it isn't a required skill. If you want to find out what the ...


3

No, there isn't a clear ranking. Just looking into comments, prior answers, and searching, you can find that this is extraordinarily subjective. Wikipedia does show much of the information that might get that list, it isn't done. Measuring freedom of journalists is actually much easier than measuring freedom for non-journalists. This is due to broadening ...


3

It's very common in Israel. There was a recent scandal when opposition members refused to pair with a coalition member whose wife had died.


3

USA The US House of representatives imposes these terms Proceedings of the House of Representatives, including any recording of such proceedings, may not be used for any political purpose or in any commercial advertisement, and may not be broadcast with commercial sponsorship except as part of a bona fide news program or public affairs documentary ...


3

There is a paragraph about similar pacts in its wikipedia page: It bore a resemblance to the turno pacifico of the restored Spanish monarchy between 1876 and 1923, in which Conservative and Liberal Parties alternated in power. The Miami Pact signed in Cuba in 1957 is also similar to that of Puntofijo. It was also a political agreement between ...


2

We do have the biblical book of "Judges". From Wikipedia's article on "Book of Judges", section called "The Deuteronomistic history": A statement repeated throughout the book "In those days there was no king in Israel" (Judges 17:6, 18:1, 19:1, and 21:25)[...] this statement is accompanied with the statement that "every man did that which was right in his ...


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