New answers tagged

2

Of course there has been debating about these words. You can find them in the morning and afternoon debates on the 14th of April 2010. The changes of 10-10-10 (first time I write a date where the order or M/D/Y doesn't matter ;)) were discussed in file number (Kamerdossier) 32213. The 'equivalency relation' means that (the parliaments of) all countries ...


6

FDR, in part, because he was in office the longest, and in part, because the courts early in his Presidency took a crabbed view of what kinds of economic regulation were constitutional that courts later in his Presidency abandoned. A list of the number of executive orders made by President can be found in this Congressional Research Service report. FDR at ...


4

As noted in a comment, the phrase "equally as may be" means "as equally as possible." To quantify this, it means that the maximum difference in class size is 1. More precisely, it means: if the number of senators is divisible by 3, the classes must be equal in size. if the number of senators is one greater than a number evenly ...


1

As with many things in law and politics, the phrase 'probable cause' was not meant to be vague; it was meant to be an interpretable guideline. It strikes a balance between two problematic extremes. On one hand, we do not want a society where police or federal agents say to themselves: Something about Joe Smith is suspicious, and we are going to go root ...


3

Was it intentionally vague or did it have a clear meaning at the time? It was clear. There were 100 years of its use in law, before Congress wrote the amendment. As a legal term, probable cause "reasonable cause or grounds" is attested from 1670s. etymology.com In the more that 200 years since, the meaning has not changed.


13

No it is not look at what you quoted again. shall be divided equally as may be into three Classes It says equally as may be not required for them all to be equal. With the current breakdown there are groups of 33, 33, 34. All of these add up to the total members of 100. No matter how you break it down it is impossible to have 3 equal groups with a total ...


5

... does the Supreme Court interpret “race” to include ethnicity in this context? Yes. Fifteenth Amendment Right to Vote Clause: Doctrine and Practice Although the "immediate concern of the Amendment was to guarantee to the emancipated slaves the right to vote," the Amendment "is cast in fundamental terms, terms transcending the particular ...


6

Any individual in the US — including the president — can make a citizen's arrest for certain crimes committed in their presence. That aside, the power to make an arrest is vested in certain official positions. These positions are established by federal, state, or local statute — i.e., by Congress, state legislatures, or local committees — and individuals are ...


3

Currently, there are no provisions in the House or Senate rules that allow members to vote remotely. As the House Rules Committee concluded, it's unclear whether this is possible through a rule change. From the CRS report – Constitutional Considerations of Remote Voting In Congress: As the House Rules Committee recently put it, “remote voting is an untested ...


25

I'd expect that if you asked the framers, they would say that they were pretty clear about who can suspend habeas corpus-- Congress. The only reference to habeas corpus in the Constitution is in Article 1, which establishes the legislative branch, Section 9 (Powers Denied Congress) which reads The Privilege of the Writ of Habeas Corpus shall not be ...


14

No, because the 18th century was more violent than life today, not less The problem with this hypothetical is that it assumes that "gun violence" was not prevalent in the 18th century, and if it was, that the idea of a lone crazy gunman would be so especially horrifying that the founders might have decided that allowing private ownership of ...


10

Up until 2012, Article 149 of the Haitian Constitution used to obligate the National Assembly, convened by the Prime Minister, to invest the President of the Supreme Court of the Republic (or, if unavailable, another senior judge in order of seniority) with the duties of President of the Republic - with new elections to be held between 45 and 90 days later. ...


1

It's not exactly what you're asking about, but it's not totally unrelated, so I thought I'd mention it. The 22nd Amendment to the US Constitution includes the text: But this Article shall not apply to any person holding the office of President when this Article was proposed by the Congress It's not by name, but technically that is a constitutional ...


1

Cuba's constitution was revised in 2019 by referendum to add Fidel Castro's name to that of José Martí's in the preamble: GUIDED by the most advanced revolutionary, anti-imperialist, Cuban-Marxist, Latin American, and universal thought, in particular by the ideal and example of Martí and Fidel, as well as the social emancipation ideas of Marx, Engels, and ...


Top 50 recent answers are included