150

Basically because your idea (assassination of corrupt politician) undermines rather than reinforces the rule of law. Usually the definition of corruption includes some kind of illegal activity. Otherwise it's just stuff you don't like for personal moral reasons. And if everyone started to use assasination to solve their moral differences... the basis of the (...


47

Interestingly, avoiding this is one of the reasons that the United States Constitution provides means for legal impeachment of the president. Dr. Franklin was for retaining the clause [on impeachment], as favorable to the executive. History furnishes one example only of a first magistrate being formally brought to public justice. Every body cried out ...


37

The US President can receive clothing as a gift. They, along with the Vice President, are pretty much the only federal employees who can accept substantial gifts, even if they come from 'prohibited sources', as long as it comes from a member of the American public; receiving gifts from foreign governments/officials without the consent of Congress is ...


35

Yes, this would be illegal. If you're a public official, you can't offer an official act (like permits) in exchange for anything of value (like campaign donations). See 18 U.S. Code § 201. Bribery of public officials and witnesses: Whoever [...] being a public official, former public official, or person selected to be a public official, otherwise than as ...


29

Trump is, as he often is, speaking in a manner that conveys no clear meaning. Taking his phrasing literally, he is discussing Exxon sending $25m to him personally, for the purpose of him spending it in his campaign. But it can also be taken as an imprecisely worded description of Exxon sending $25m to his campaign. A politician's campaign and the politician ...


27

The question is whether the politician is corrupt or the whole society is corrupt. Often most corrupt politicians belong to corrupt societies. Therefore, if you kill a corrupt politician, another one will take their place. The same thing happens with drug traffickers: whenever a cartel falls, another one takes control of the vacuum left behind because the ...


22

There are primarily two reasons: competitiveness and corruption. Competitiveness You did hit the nail on the head - part of the reason is competitiveness. Public offices compete with private jobs for the same people. In order for public office to be an attractive prospect, the salary needs to be competitive with the kinds of jobs they would be able to ...


21

Suppose, as per the premise of the question, that the public is fond of sponsoring assassinations. A clever corrupt politician could use that to his own advantage, and the nation's detriment: A politician could weaponize the state's propaganda system to mold public resentment toward prominent reformers, so that the gullible public could be wrongly ...


19

I work in a position which is very close to the German public administration system, so I might be able to give some insight into how Germany tries to prevent corruption among its civil servants. It is not just the German mentality itself, but rather the structures which result from it. Civil servants ("Beamte") are treated very well. They get ...


18

Trump primarily appealed to his audience by stating what it wanted to hear. He said he'd 'drain the swamp' of all the lobbyists who had hurt the country’s working class. To the best of my knowledge, he didn't get much more specific than that except: He also said he would impose a lifetime ban on top executive administration staff from lobbying ‘on behalf of ...


18

NBC has the order of events/statements a bit more clearly outlined In a recent interview, Clinton didn't mention Democratic presidential candidate Rep. Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii by name, but said she believes one candidate is "the favorite of the Russians." Asked if the former secretary of state was referring to Gabbard, Clinton spokesman Nick Merrill said, ...


17

Formally, the Twenty Seventh Amendment stipulates that salary changes made by congress cannot take effect until after the next house elections. No law, varying the compensation for the services of the Senators and Representatives, shall take effect, until an election of Representatives shall have intervened. In other words, Representatives would be ...


17

The frugality rules referred to in the article are also known as the Eight-point Regulation enacted in 2012. Here is an official summary of the key points. I've emphasized main topics in bold. Leaders must keep in close contact with the grassroots. They must understand the real situation facing society through in-depth inspections at grassroots. Greater ...


16

Zero electors who were supposed to vote for Hillary Clinton voted for Donald Trump instead. So no electors could have been persuaded by Russia (or anyone) to switch to Donald Trump, because that simply didn't happen. The reason why the electoral college differed from the popular vote is due to the structure of the electoral college. The electoral ...


16

Apart from whether your approach would be conducive to justice or a better political system or even just any improvement whatsoever — it will not work. Do you think you are the first one who has the idea to kill the president or other politicians? They are quite well protected, and after the first few incidents the protection will be watertight. But ...


15

Letting aside the ethics, who gets to decide who is corrupt? Taking the USA's political state since 2015-2016, i.e. the last POTUS election we have: a large proportion of US voters who believe Hillary Clinton is corrupt. a large proportion of US voters who believe Donald Trump is corrupt. It could be that they are both corrupt. Or that neither is corrupt....


14

The British Empire controlled many different territories under different rules, and the rules changed over time as well. The Indian Councils Act 1861 was an early step towards involving Indians in the administration of India. It fell far short of granting independence, but it gave some Indians some role in politics. Acts in 1892, 1909, and 1919 gave ...


13

For context: The video in question showed Strache and a colleague of his with a woman purporting to be the niece of a Russian oligarch. She promised to influence the election in their favor, and in turn wanted to gain work orders from the state, as well as take over a popular, far-right news paper which could then further help the FPÖ in the election. ...


12

Theory: Politicians in a democracy need to earn enough to be financial independent. Otherwise they would depend on other sources of income during their mandate. Those sources of income would then have control over the politician and could exert influence on their decisions. That income should be large enough that a politician is not susceptible to bribery. ...


12

First of all, what's the problem you're trying to solve? You want better government? Then consider that corruption may not be as big a problem as incompetence, ideology or partisanship, in some societies. So you kill all the corrupt politicians, but leave the incompetent, ideologically-driven, hyper-partisan ones in place. You may not have solved the ...


11

It is hard to evaluate the corruption in each countries. What we could use is the CPI (Corruption Perceptions Index). According to the list, the 5 least corrupted countries are: Denmark: had a Blasphemy law until June 2017 (link) New Zealand: has a "Blasphemy libel" law still valid (link) Finland: has a valid Blasphemy law (link) Sweden: does not ...


11

What is HCQ? Let's back up and consider the history of hydroxychloroquine(HCQ). It's primarily a drug used in treating Malaria. The best description I've heard of how it works is this Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine actually slow down parts of a patient’s immune system by “interfere with lysosomal activity and autophagy, interact with membrane stability ...


10

Why don't politicians decide to pass laws that make themselves really rich? They do. But the most effective way of doing so is not directly take government money and give it to the legislature members, but pass legislation that would benefit industry with which the representatives are associated or the companies that sponsor the election campaign. This ...


10

The question is titled: Why is it a bad idea to hire a hitman [to kill corrupt] politicians? Well, from a moral standpoint, it's wrong. It depends on your yardstick for corruption, but let's say as you imply it's some run of the mill embezzling/defruading the state. You've implied a benchmark of: whenever politicians became too shameless in their ...


10

ExxonMobil does in fact make political donations. Mostly, but not exclusively, to Republicans. They have a PAC for this purpose. They also make contributions directly rather than through the PAC. Here's their own web page describing the process. The only thing that would seem to be illegal is a direct exchange of money for favours. Indirect exchange of money ...


9

At the level of abstraction you're describing it, it doesn't sound odious. Even if you're personally honest, if you accept public office, you're going to risk being accused of misconduct -- for example, by political opponents who disagree with your policy choices and hope to get rid of you by alleging personal faults. There's a good argument that if the ...


9

A shortening of the election cycle would result in: a greater degree of overheads a risk of reduced traction (the bigger the government - the more pronounced this issue - and this is a situation where new 'heads' require time to get a feel for their 'feet' so as to start 'running' their respective sections) also an increased pressure to switch to electronic ...


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