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40

Possibly. There is no internationally accepted definition of a coup. It is a coup if the legitimate government is overthrown by force. It is not a coup if the government finds it politically expedient to follow the wishes of the population. It is not a coup if the military refuses orders of an unconstitutional government, either. Has the Morales government ...


27

Short Answer No. Obviously, anyone can bring a lawsuit at any time on any theory, but such as lawsuit would be dismissed early on in any of the forums in which it could be brought. It does not state a valid legal claim that can prevail in some tribunal that can enforce it. What Is International Law? International law is not a settled, consensus thing in ...


24

Not taking over North Korea is not exactly because of the difficulties involved, since the Chinese have a relatively powerful military currently. Rather, it doesn't benefit China much. Firstly, China would have to inherit the whole North Korean population and provide them with food, necessities, etc. It may even result in a refugee crisis for China should ...


23

From the sheer size of that list, it wasn't drawn up from scratch in response to the attempted coup but long before. It's impossible to say if all of them have ties to political opponents of Erdogan or if they were simply marked "uncertain loyalty", but it would be astonishing if all those judges were somehow involved in such a small, clumsy and ...


21

The fraud accusations were mostly proven on Sunday 10th of November with a preliminary report of the audit being held by the OAS. I'm not privy with the details, but I'm familiar with where the coup chatter is coming from. According to reporting by The Nation (which got picked up by other outlets, such as Democracy Now), the OAS said there was fraud, but ...


20

Not a complete answer, but elements of thoughts: Even if China could somehow kill Kim Jong Un and get away with it, would that mean the collapse of NK regime? After all, it has survived the successive deaths of Kim Il Sung and Kim Jong Il without major changes in its shape. NK can be a pain in the neck for China, but it sure is a bigger problem for the US ...


19

Evidences for quasi-coup: The bombardments were not targeted at Erdogan. He reached the airport more or less unimpeded to speak. The army retreated rapidly. Compare this with Egypt: The Egyptian army killed more than a thousand. Some army soldiers say they have been told that they are going to a maneuver. When they were confronted by civilian they ...


17

That is highly likely a coup. Just consider the speed of OAS giving support to the opposition. Let's also consider the face of an opposition. It is common for western-supported South America leaders to be: Right-wing Christian, or position himself so Rich Considering US as a very close ally Western education Those points can be applicable to each and ...


12

No, it's unlikely to be the president's doing. The military has been trying to depose him for bringing god into government since he was elected. That 300 senior army officers were sentenced to prison in 2012 for plotting a coup speaks volumes. And that probably gave an opportunity to gut the military of the majority of its Kemalists. The Turkish ...


12

The BBC shows Mnangagwa to be a politically shrewd and occasionally ruthless autocrat who was in tight with the military. On a more positive note, he did also try to get some commercial activities going in this economically destitute country. Grace Mugabe has been slowly accumulating power and ousting potential adversaries over the last several years. Her ...


11

A few facts related to Morales and the election. Until a few years ago, he was rather popular. In 2016, he considered running for a fourth term, in violation of the constitution. Wikipedia's page on Evo Morales summarizes In February 2016, a referendum was held on the question of whether Morales should be allowed to run for a fourth term; he narrowly lost.[...


10

Turkey has seen a rapid political change in the last decade, it has transitioned from a system where secularism was constitutionally mandated in which the current government would not have been allowed to govern. The military used to have the right to intervene in the political system. In 1997, the military removed the Turkish government from power, but ...


10

Could faithless electors really change the USA president? It's possible under current laws, but in reality, it's very difficult. That's actually a grey area in states that don't have any law to prevent it. Some states like you stated have a fine, while others simply disregard the vote and he/she will be replaced by a substitute elector. Even though ...


8

Basically, the reason is that everybody except the North Korean people are more or less happy with the way things are. If anything changes, Seoul gets bombarded, China loses its buffer state, and it has to deal with millions of starving refugees. The only problem is, the country itself is unsustainable in a very basic sense-- as far as its ability to feed ...


8

There are plenty of examples in which a coup is staged by a paramilitary organisation: The group known variously as "Daesh" or ISIS controlled much of Syria. An association of Tuareg militia controlled northern Mali. The Houthi movement has control in Yemen. Large countries are not immune: A communist paramilitary group expanded their control from some ...


5

As a 2006 article in the LA Times states: Though Lopez [...] says he didn't participate in the short-lived [2002] coup, he did help lead demonstrations against the fiery leftist president in the preceding days. He also was a driving force in the post-coup general strike that almost brought the Venezuelan economy to a halt. [...] ...


5

After following the events for a few days, I have a theory that the answer might be both Yes and No. No, Erdogan did not stage it all, but yes he triggered it when he didn't have to. The scenario is that a coup by opponents of Erdogan was in some stage of development and subsequently infiltrated by or betrayed to Erdogan loyalists. Rather than going through ...


5

We don't know yet and possibly won't ever know for sure. One theory that I find plausible: Parts of the military were unhappy with Erdogan, for various reasons: the political splits between the (tradionally Kemalist) military and the (sorta-islamist) AKP. The most current reason would be the war against the Kurds Turkey is waging right now, where the ...


4

I'll keep it pretty simple - North Korea has a massive conventional army (the majority of their money goes into military) and leadership that really doesn't care what happens to their people. Plus now they have nukes. If there was ever a time when it would be easy to march in and take them out, that time has long passed. The other reason is - why would ...


4

Kind of He certainly arrested a Chavez minister. While he claims that he was just trying to keep them safe, I don't think even his supporters believe that: Many are still angry with him for taking part in the citizens arrest of Chavez's interior minister, Ramon Rodriguez Chacin, during the coup. And they say he has helped divide Venezuela by ...


4

Declassified CIA documents reported on by The New York Times and pro-Chavez media suggest that the U.S. knew about the coup but told the plotters they wouldn't support them. The Central Intelligence Agency was aware that dissident military officers and opposition figures in Venezuela were planning a coup against President Hugo Chávez in 2002, newly ...


4

What constitutes a coup? There's no real definition of what a coup d'etat really means. The Britannica Encyclopedia suggest for example: Coup d’état, also called Coup, the sudden, violent overthrow of an existing government by a small group. The chief prerequisite for a coup is control of all or part of the armed forces, the police, and other military ...


3

Historically, Turkish military coups were carried out by secular elements in the army, aiming to protect the secular heritage of Atatürk. It should be noted that in the last years Erdoǧan and his former ally Gülen tried to change this. So Gülen really has some support in the Turkish army. Next, Gülen is pro-American. And USA continues helping to the Kurds, ...


3

IMO, North Korea's nuclear program poses a much larger threat to China as compared to the US. Even with North Korea's newest ICBM, only a small part of the US (Guam, Northern Marianas, parts of Alaska which are barely populated, and probably parts of Hawaii) are under threat. Also, let's not overlook the fact that the US has a huge and mature National ...


2

Not a coup. Yet During a coup, several individuals or groups vie for control of the state and the monopoly on violence is not existing. What is happening in Bolivia is that all the people within a stone's throw of legal justification for controlling the state, has stepped down (or even fled) and the military has in addition to expressing their non support ...


2

China is a government that throughout this political conflict has shown prudence and maturity. It is for this reason that it makes sense that it defends North Korea, since the threats of US imperialism are not rational, let alone if we think of the history of policies that the United States has imported to the rest of the world, thus capitalism A real threat ...


2

At this point of date and time, there's nothing we can know for sure. Only in maybe 60 years in the future, when Erdogan's regime would enter into history and scholars could study the subject on a neutral and objective point of view, this question will be answered. Where he has gotten his inspiration from is obvious. Read the intro of the following ...


2

Yes, the situation most resembles a coup, compared to alternative namings. There are many different ways to call the same thing, and when the situation is unclear, the position of the speaker often influences what he chooses to call it. From the known facts, we can establish that some kind of not entirely voluntary change of government has taken place. ...


1

This other question asks whether a US citizen can sue the government for failing to uphold criminal laws. While the question is different, the answer is largely the same, so all quotes below are from the accepted answer by Avi. This is for a large number of reasons. First, both the State and Federal governments have sovereign immunity, according to the ...


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