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117

They don't. While there are a lot of half-assed arguments (on both sides, to be fair), any serious statistical analysis that actually controls for variables comes down on the side of gun control. A good example of this is a recent meta-analysis of 130 studies from 10 countries which found: Evidence from 130 studies in 10 countries suggests that in ...


90

That's a somewhat specious argument, because the ability to illegally obtain weapons is made easier by lax gun laws, and the guns that make it to the illegal market, by and large, start out as firearms that are legally sourced from the manufacturer. The patchwork of gun laws means that states with the least restrictive laws for purchasing guns become the ...


76

The real problem with questions like this is in assuming that gun ownership is a cause rather than a symptom. I answered a similar question a year or two ago, but comparing Canada and USA, and mass killings rather than crime in general. But I think the same explanation applies. Why does the USA have mass killings in a seemingly scheduled basis, and ...


67

There are actually several points that make it different: The European charter of fundamental rights states in its very first article that human dignity is inviolable. (Just like the German Basic Law btw.) This automatically forbids any action of the state taking the life of any human being as a form of sanction. Also people on death row usually wait for ...


63

I can answer this from the US angles, which largely mirrors the European thinking. Stats from this Wikipedia entry The justice system sometimes fails. There are people unwilling to accept a system that could execute an innocent person. 157 people sentenced to death in the US have been exonerated since 1973. Death penalty cases largely mirror life sentences ...


57

It is very easy to get a gun illegally. Be a non-citizen/resident, minor, felon, or have been adjudicated to be insane Go to Texas Look for "deer stick", "bangs", "outdoor toy" on craigslist. Meet the seller on a gun range with cash and test that the gun works properly Don't tell him that you are 1. I did actually encounter someone who forgot 5) and told ...


52

Cocaine Coca leaf is native to South America and grows best there, so that's where the cocaine comes from. Not only does this produce a huge amount of profit for organised crime, the drug itself promotes aggression. Almost all the drug wars are primarily concerned with cocaine and secondly with marijuana which also grows well there. Colonialism, Communism ...


44

I think you actually asked the wrong question. What you really want to know isn't how hard is it to get an illegal gun in the United States, but how hard is it to get a gun in a country with strict gun control laws. The answer is that buying an illegal handgun in Australia can cost as much as $15,000. So while you can get them, I wouldn't worry about ...


39

If you compare the European Union to the United States, the EU has less crime, including crimes that have nothing to do with guns. For example, there are fewer domestic knife assaults. These are crimes that are unlikely to be prevented by guns (unless one spouse would be walking around the house with a gun just in case the other spouse pulls a knife). ...


37

Because they're not at war. Referencing this paper, Wikipedia clarifies the methodology: The following 50 cities have the highest murder rates in the world of all cities not at war, with a population of at least 300,000 people If cities within warring nations were including, the rankings would change. For example, in Damascus (population 1.7 million) ...


36

The law in Iceland dates from the 1940s, and is modelled on Danish laws of the period. Pre-1940, an adult convicted of a serious crime (one which is "outrageous to public opinion" and leads to a prison sentence of 4 months or more) would lose their "honour". This had various consequences, including losing the right to vote in Althing elections. The 1940 law ...


27

Yes. This article on the BBC from 2016 states that 13000 Arrest warrants are outstanding, on people who have jumped bail, or as in the words of the article Figures obtained by the BBC show more than 13,000 people are subject to outstanding arrest warrants in England, with the oldest dating back to 1980. The BBC asked for details of arrest warrants ...


26

It could, but you would need to initiate an extradition process. Extradition processes depend on bilateral treaties (if you don't have one with the country the criminal is in, you can't get him/her extradited) and generally are a long, twisted, problematic burocratic nightmare. The EAW was created to ease that processes. Essentially it assumes that all the ...


24

Blockchain-based cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin aren't actually that untraceable, because the transfer history of every wallet is public. When cryptocurrencies ever become economically relevant, you can expect law enforcement to put all those currently hyped big data analysis and machine learning technologies to use and data-mine the blockchains for ...


23

All gun advocates who claim this have not done their research. A recent study done by the CDC (2013) found that there was no significant correlation between gun ownership and violent crimes, which suggests that anyone who makes any claims regarding gun ownership and crime, are wrong. Though they did conclude that guns are probably used to prevent crime far ...


21

The fuller context of the quote (emphasis on the part the question quoted): Frost: The wave of dissent, occasionally violent, which followed in the wake of the Cambodian incursion, prompted President Nixon to demand better intelligence about the people who were opposing him. To this end, the Deputy White House Counsel, Tom Huston, arranged a series of ...


18

Is my understanding of the "more guns less crime" argument correct? Yes. This can be split into 2 subarguments: In areas with high gun ownership, criminals will think twice before victimizing people because they will be afraid of being shot. When an armed person is assaulted, they can defend themselves so the crime attempt is not successful. Is the ...


15

Whether this is "racism" depends on exactly how you define the word. The proposed measure does not refer to race, so by a strict reading it is not racist. It does mention "foreigners", but it doesn't specify any particular race of foreigner (presumed to mean a resident who is not a citizen). Furthermore citizens of whatever race are not included in this term....


14

TL;DR It profits both private industry and the political establishment to maintain high incarceration rates. The penal codes and incarceration techniques are a response to the demand for more prisoners not a reaction to crime, primarily sponsored by the think tank ALEC. As the prison population grows, a rising rate of incarceration feeds small and large ...


14

Governor Rod Blagojevich was charged and released on bail prior to being impeached and things going to trial. Holding office does not grant immunity, nor does impeachment automatically imply removal from office, and neither are a prerequisite for criminal proceedings to be undertaken. Governor Evan Meecham of Arizona, for example, was not even impeached ...


14

Some have heard it said "when seconds count, the police are minutes away." Well, perhaps. But that's not what makes the argument. What we have here is kind of a division; in the cities, people would (most likely) be safer if guns were not generally available because the police time is reasonably fast. I called them down on a 5v1 fistfight and they got there ...


14

pjc50's answer is good. I would add that proximity to the world's largest gun manufacturer - the United States, makes the flow of guns to the Central Americas much easier. This opinion piece explains how the Cold War affected and the US affects gun ownership in Central and South America. During the 1980s, El Salvador was the single largest recipient of ...


13

I see your point but this has its origins in how the penal code is conceived in the European history of law. Basically from Hegel onwards, the law has been thought of not as something that is supposed to extract revenge on the criminal, because at its base you can not undo a crime that has been done. The function of the law, especially the penal code, is ...


13

The common process of extradition, even between allied states, is lengthy and costly. The European Commission regularly makes factsheets for this and other subjects (PDF): The European Justice portal also has a lot of information about this subject including statistics about its use: The previous average of extradition time of 1 year dropped to 48 days: ...


12

Firstly, I should point out that most sexual crime is committed by someone the victim knows - 'stranger danger' is less of a fear than 'partner danger'... or in many circumstances 'pimp danger'. Rape and sexual assault are generally not about sex, but have more to do with the assertion of power. Given this, laws providing greater access to sex (assuming ...


12

Maybe, but by no means necessarily. The laws of war are designed to be rules that military forces can actually follow; war is a very messy business, and militaries in wartime can't reasonably be held to the standard you'd expect of, say, a civilian police force. So, the laws of war do not include a blanket rule of "don't kill civilians." War will result in ...


12

Let's consider the purposes of punishment: Incapacitation. We want to prevent the person from committing another crime. Retribution. We want to prevent circles of retribution by having a third party, the government, handle the punishment. Deterrence. We want to convince people not to commit that crime. This includes both the current perpetrator (...


11

What was the stated reason for giving Trump this award? Trump speaks at HBCU Benedict College as students are asked to stay in dorms, Oct. 25, 2019. Trump was honored for leadership in the passage of the First Step Act, which expands opportunities for elderly inmates to get released, increases the amount of good-time credit inmates can receive and has ...


10

The issue is far more complex than a simple historical rate comparison. You can find a summary of several reports here, and can access the reports by clicking the relevant links. Excerpts of the main findings: The 2005 report by the Swedish National Council for Crime Prevention studying 4.4 million Swedes between the ages of 15 and 51 during the period ...


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