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53

First of all, there's a difference between recognizing that Crimea is a Russian territory and recognizing that Crimean residents are Russian citizens. Taking up the Russian citizenship was voluntary and the EU or the US cannot dictate whether or not a given person can become a Russian citizen by choice. There are still hundreds of thousands of dual Ukrainian-...


24

For most of those countries, it's a mixture of factors: Russian financial support, military support, or energy support (particularly with regard to Syria) Opposition to the West and intent to deliver diplomatic defeats or to not be seen by a domestic audience supporting the West (Bolivia, Venezuela, Cuba, Nicaragua voting together in Chavista style against ...


22

You are asking a loaded question because I can predict what the outcome is. If Russia denies the Crimeans to vote, then the EU/USA will vilify Russia because it suppresses the opinion of the Crimeans and it shows that Russia is afraid of a vote which will show that the Crimeans do not want to be ruled by Russia. If Russia allows the Crimeans to vote, then ...


21

The Crimean declaration of independence is to the benefit of Russia. The Kosovan declaration of independence is to the detriment of Russia's ally, Serbia. So Russia chooses to recognise the former, but not the latter. To recognise one, but not the other is not without hypocrisy, though the same accusation could be levelled at the EU for recognising Kosovo ...


19

When the Russian soldiers first deployed in the Crimea, Turchynov feared that any provocation would lead to a full scale war, a war he'd have very little chance of winning. He compared the situation with the Russian deployment in Abkhazia and South Ossetia (which started under the same general pretense of protecting the Russian citizens there): "Russia ...


18

First of all, the referendum was illegal according to Ukrainian law, because in Ukraine a referendum cannot be conducted in only a part of the country. Second, the referendum was conducted with the support of the Russian Military, which is a violation of the UN Charter and the Russian-Ukrainian treaty about Russian military presence in Crimea (the quotas ...


18

Legal Usage of Force Under the UN charter, military force can only be used for self-defense or when deployed be the international community for collective security. 'Collective security' is to be determined by the UN Security Council. Source: Article 42 of the United Nations Charter The Problems with Crimea The central problem is that Russia used ...


16

This makes me wonder, are there regions within Russia that have a majority population that is not ethnic Russian? Answer is yes, according to 2010 Russian Census, there are several smaller or bigger regions where Russian ethnicity is minority. If this racial/nationalist argument was taken to its extreme, how much territory would Russia stand to lose? ...


15

It is currently not a violation. The Geneva Conventions apply to international armed conflicts between state parties (Ukraine and Russia are both parties). Russia has contended that it is not invading, but has actually been invited by the legitimate government in Crimea to protect Crimea from evil Ukrainian fascists. However, Article 1 of Protocol I ...


14

The referendum seems to be unconstitutional. The relevant legal source appear to be article 72 and 73 of the Ukranian constitution. Article 73 states that any decisions on the territory of Ukraine must be resolved by an "All-Ukrainian referendum". Article 72 states that this type of referendum needs to be requested by at least three million citizens, "...


13

Disclaimer (it is sooo difficult right now to have a real discussion concerning Russia): Do not call me a Russian troll - you want to know what Putin thinks, so I try explain what he thinks as I see it and to provide reasons he does so. Whether they're valid or not to you is not important in this context, only whether they may be valid to Putin. First of ...


12

This appear to be highly unlikely for several reasons: The Black Sea is currently ice-free. If any NATO actions (NATO being a military and not a political organization) were to take place they could easily occur now as there little to prevent sea or land resupply of any military. If the questioner means the European Union, a political body, instead of NATO, ...


12

(I'm cutting out question 2 because it's not about gas and the answers already very long.) Have EU nations made any plan to counter possible gas crisis? Politicians claim the US plans to allow Europe to purchase liquified natural gas through an expedited process. Four European nations have expressly requested this aid as the US is the worlds largest natural ...


12

This is a reasonable question, given the geographic and demographic spread of the largest country in the world. But Russian policy tends to focus on citizenship rather than language and ethnicity. The Russian government gave out passports to large numbers of Ossetians and Akhazians, as well as stationing troops in Transnistria. Significant numbers of ...


12

Aside from the reasons listed in other answers, the annexation violated at least two treaties Russia agreed to honor: The Helsinki accords from 1975 forbids any non-consensual border changes in Europe The Budapest Memorandum guarantees the borders of the Ukraine as of 1994..


12

Short version: neither the US or the EU rule the world. Long version: Legitimate is either an internal legal question, or an external political statement. Internally, it only matters if there is also an internal mechanism for enforcing the law. Externally, calling another government non-legitimate is part of the process of either putting pressure on ...


11

What it's about: The question is really too broad to be answered properly, but let's try to boil it down to bumper stickers: Russia has a desire to control neighboring territory (directly or indirectly). Reasons vary (defense depth/military; economics; energy; national psyche) Ukraine is a prime target in ALL of these reasons: It is a defensive buffer ...


11

Crimea is a very fertile agricultural region, and is often seen as a vacation spot for Russians. Those are two economic activities that while not economic powerhouses can still usually be net positives for a state economy. That said, Russia's interests in Crimea are far more geopolitically strategic than economic. The Crimean port of Sevastopol is home to ...


11

Noone knows this 100% exactly. Many people have both Ukranian and Russian passports. And they will not answer you honestly how many passports do they have. Russian and Ukrainian governments do not exchange this data between each other. As mentioned, Russia's policy is to give Russian passports to as more people as possible. Empire buys citizens. And then ...


9

The Ukranians have not surrendered. There is currently a stand-off between Russia and the Ukraine, which is attempting to be solved diplomatically. Klitschko told The Associated Press that "of course" he is afraid of Russian aggression, but said the standoff over Crimea shouldn't be solved "on a military level." "We must do ...


9

The BBC also has an article on that documentary. Barring any translation errors, what Putin said was a less obvious admission of the methods, at least those prior to the events...: Mr Putin said on TV he had ordered work on "returning Crimea" to begin at an all-night meeting on 22 February. [...] "I invited the leaders of our special services ...


8

There are two main ways, but both aren't very quick to implement and are a bit more expensive than the current Russian gas. First, building extra infrastructure for alternative gas supplies - both pipelines and liquified natural gas terminals - can provide an alternative supplier for the gas. This improves gas supplies even if there is no political crisis, ...


7

There are several reasons why Ukrainian soldiers didn't fight in Crimea 1) A historical and cultural bond with the Russians 2) A lack of sufficient support from the local population 3) An uncertainty caused by Kiev’s echelon of power 4) A lack of success even if they had tried to fight 1) If you are familiar with the history of the USSR ...


7

Yes, there were plenty such groups within the Russian opposition. The largest of those is the Yabloko party. Their presidential candidate in 2018 stated that: Any form of forceful intervention in the internal affairs of Ukraine, as well as the incitement and propaganda of war should be stopped. Commitments to Ukraine's territorial integrity and respect by ...


7

It would probably be open to interpretation and action would depend on what the UK did, what Russia did and how good a case the UK could make. This is because HMS Defender was not obviously operating in a NATO zone. Citing the treaty: Article 5 The Parties agree that an armed attack against one or more of them in Europe or North America shall be considered ...


6

This article explains a lot of what happen with Ukraine army in Crimea and elsewhere. To highlight some good points: Ukraine army is dramatically underfunded: How bad is it? Only 1 in 10 Ukrainian troops staring across the border at Russia are protected by body armor. The country has lost at least three helicopters trying to take a better look at the ...


6

The quoted source talks about people on free and recently liberated territories of Donbas who know the war and who don't want the invaders to come to their land. The people of free regions can speak out freely. But we don't know the public opinion of people on Russia-controlled territories of Crimea or Donbas. Whatever happens behind the barbed wire or at ...


5

As you said, it's nearly impossible to do a short answer. However, as good basis of understanding: Nearly 100% of Russian mass media (including 100% of TV) is controlled by Russian government, directly or indirectly Very little of German media is controlled by the government, German or especially USA. Most of them are far to the left of Merkel, and ...


5

In your question there is a false assumption that Russia in some way recognized the legitimacy of the declaration of independence of Kosovo. However, it's not the case. Your quote is the statement made by the Republic of Crimea. That was not a statement made by Russia. Whatever the reasoning was on the part of the Republic of Crimea, it DID NOT automatically ...


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