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3

It would be an overstatement to say with any kind of certainty that "the broader Democratic Party agrees", whether you are asking about elected officials or the base, nationally or locally. There can be no certain answer, as I'm seeing no relevant public opinion poll, and no specific bill that has been voted on. However, what we do know is that ...


6

I calculated average case increases for the last 60 days, and took the ratio of that to all cases. Thus, the smaller the ratio, the more it indicates that the current case increases are far less than the peak, hence indicating a flattening of the slope. The data is below. I then ran a two-sample t-test for means. There is overwhelming evidence that the mean ...


17

The metric the question mentions is 'flattening the curve of cases'. There is some debate on how to measure this, but the specific metric I've decided to use is to fit a polynomial curve to the graph of cases over time, starting from when each state recorded their 100th case. I then take the second derivative of this curve, and evaluate it at the current ...


10

It's pretty clearly purely for the sake of optics. In particular, note that this measure did not come up when we had a Democratic majority in the Senate and a Democratic President so it stood at least some chance of being passed. There's a pretty simple reason for that. The US Constitution (article 1, Section 8) says: The Congress shall have Power [...] 17: ...


69

After your edits I interpret your question to essentially be: Why would politicians propose or vote for things they know won't pass into legislation? There is nothing particularly Democratic (or Republican) about this, politicians of all colors do this. Some of the reasons I can think of are: Give visibility to the issue. I had never heard about this ...


110

One of the core issues, beyond claims it's all about increasing Senatorial power for a party, is that of representation and enfranchisement of US citizens; tax-paying ones, in this case (raising some ironic "no taxation without representation" connections). The district has about 705,000 people residing in it, absolutely none of whom is ...


24

The push isn't new, with efforts starting in the 1980s to make a new state. With the current racial tensions running high, it should be noted that Washington D.C. is 49% black. They currently get no voting representation in Congress, although the District gets 3 Electoral College votes, the same as if it were a state. Senate seats If Washington D.C becomes a ...


4

Here is a piece from Pacific Standard which quotes the following explanation: "When a candidate is perceived as adhering to a set of religious values, voters see them as moral and possessing high levels of integrity and honesty," write political scientists Scott Clifford of the University of Houston and Ben Gaskins of Lewis & Clark College. &...


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