New answers tagged

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There is such a correlation, but the line of causation that is suggested in the question has not been established and is unlikely. High rents are a good indicator of high average per capita income and high economic productivity. Immigration is heavily influenced by economic opportunity, and from the perspective of someone in another country, high average per ...


0

Your question might be read as "Did postal voting give Biden an unfair advantage", or it could read as "Did postal voting enable fraud to the advantage of Biden", which should also be addressed. Fact is that in postal votes, Biden received a much higher percentage of votes than he received in in-person votes. So if someone, especially a ...


1

tl;dr: The urban / suburban / rural divide is at play once more; this time in regards to pandemic-related risks to voting in person. Fizz's excellent answer is completely correct that both of these issues factored in heavily: Trump was extremely critical of mail-in voting throughout the entire election cycle. Even beyond that, though, Republicans in ...


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Interesting story, that. All during the pandemic, Trump had been releasing statements that were at best downplaying its seriousness, and in many cases flat out lying about its risks. He'd also been publicly attacking the credibility of those who weren't downplaying it, like the WHO and the nation's top health professionals. Republicans at the time were far ...


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Concern over COVID19 seems to have a relationship to political leaning This study shows these differences fairly starkly*. Democrats are much more concerned with the transmission of the virus than republicans: By June 77% of Dem/Lean Dem participants answered that they were concerned they might unknowingly spread COVID-19 to others compared to 45% of Rep/...


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I think the other answers are correct in that both of these are factors: Trump and some of the Republican leadership (repeatedly) slamming postal voting Republicans being less afraid of Covid-19 and thus less inclined to socially distance (also reflected in some of Trump's comments on the pandemic and his personal example) Alas answers (and comments) have ...


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Two theories: fraud or because many more Democrats than Republicans voted using mail-in ballots. We have no credible evidence of fraud. We have polls indicating that more Democrats than Republicans intended to vote by mail: But among Trump supporters, only 11 percent said they planned to vote by mail, and 66 percent said they planned to vote in person on ...


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Trump had become less popular, voters favored Biden, so the votes as a whole necessarily reflect that. As for why Biden voters went postal more often that Trump voters, there are three reasons: COVID. Most of the nation took COVID seriously, and wished to avoid the horrific possibility of superspreader voting lines. A more general public awareness of ...


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Donald Trump spent months making statements, to the media and on Twitter, along the lines of: Mail-in ballots are very dangerous. There’s tremendous fraud involved and tremendous illegality. (source) It's hardly surprising that Republican voters decided to take him at his word and not trust mail-in ballots.


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The Trump campaign did a lot to demonize mail in voting with accusations that there was a lot of fraud with it. This along with the downplaying of covid among his supporters likely led to a lower mail in voting turnout and higher in person turnout. There was a concern among Republicans that the campaign against mail in voting would cost votes in the long run....


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The Democrats strongly supported voting by mail due to Covid-19, to avoid risk of infection, while Trump downplayed the pandemic. ScienceDaily: COVID-19 opens a partisan gap on voting by mail This is a case in Texas where Democrats attempted to extend mail voting: https://www.cnbc.com/2020/06/26/coronavirus-supreme-court-rejects-universal-vote-by-mail-in-...


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Persons who voted for Joe Biden over Donald Trump tend to be younger, paid less, and more in favor of masks/less likely of voting in person during a pandemic. Younger people tend to have less schedule flexibility as they are still working their way up in the corporate world (or are working non-9-to-5 hours in the retail/service sectors). This would lead them ...


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Shifting voting patterns doesn't mean the Republican party itself is in trouble, only its current political ideology. In the long term it means the Republican party will probably have to change to accommodate more voters. Example of something which the Republican stance has shifted on. In the period 1850–1870, the Republican Party was more opposed to ...


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Does this picture represent people, mostly Democrats, moving south? Not really. I don't think there is any one factor. The 2012 election was a low turnout event for the reelection of a somewhat favorable African-American no-drama Democratic president versus a blandish Republican opponent that occurred when the country had in the midst of recovering from a ...


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