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12

The data for this question, and many you ask, is readily available from the MIT Election Lab, specifically here I used the "U.S. President 1976-2020" dataset. The correlation between the figures you ask is r=-.08, p=.6. If you remove Utah, which had a successful third party candidate in Evan McMullin in 2016 (receiving 21.5% of the vote), the ...


23

This answer is only looking at fertility rates, not other measures, such as immigration. Also, when looking at fertility rates take into account that 2.1 is the neutral no-increase/no-decrease rate TLDR: I don't think there has been a case in modern times where a country wanting to reverse a fertility drop has actually achieved this. At best, they have ...


26

The population of Germany declined from 2000 to 2011, it then increased. This rise has been attributed to immigration. One way for a country to increase population, without increasing fertility, is to increase the level of immigration. Source (The jump from 2010 to 2011 is due to a change in the way population was counted and isn't a real feature)


3

This depends very much on how you measure things like what it means for a person to be part of the group you're envisioning when you say "the party where people [whatever]." To better highlight what I mean, I'll relate political parties to sports teams. An American football team has 40-50 people wearing the jerseys and doing something on the field ...


1

Self-selection bias is absolutely a thing, but the question is being asked in reverse. The phenomenon is better inquired into with: "Why does the Democrat party appeal more to geographically clustered populations?" There's a number of forces in play, far more than reasonably fit into an SE answer, so I'll cover my top three: I. Dense populations ...


-5

Simple answer, Democrat policies appeal more to people in densely packed urban and inner city areas. Republican policies the opposite. The more densely packed an area the more dependent people are on local and national services.


13

Overview Why are Democrats more concentrated more at a neighborhood by neighborhood level? First of all, the trend is real. Image Source: CDJB Migration and economics drive this trend. Partisan segregation holds true, however, without regard to population density and also appears to be supported by migration. Both Democrats and Republicans are highly ...


6

This is not verifiable to the public. The Chinese leadership did not explain why they're making this call. But people can speculate: Ahead of China's latest census, experts had speculated that birth restrictions might be lifted entirely - though it appears as though China is treading cautiously. But others said that such a move could potentially lead to &...


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