106

It is highly unlikely that a recount will give Trump a chance to win the election. Recounts just don't move number of votes enough to change an election where Biden had such a raw lead over Trump. It's entirely possible that Trump is going to fight any way he can, even if there are slim odds of the fight winning, to not give up presidency. That is not ...


92

I think the obvious answer to this question is that Trump doesn't want the issue of voter fraud to have a solution; he wants the issue to be a problem. If there were any evidence that widespread, significant voter fraud existed, then it would make sense to ask why Trump took no steps to stop it. One would expect a president to address a national crisis of ...


87

In May of 2020, Biden committed not to pardon Trump or otherwise interfere with any investigations that the Justice Department may or may not carry out: Democratic candidate Joe Biden said that if he wins the presidency he would not use his power to pardon Donald Trump or stop any investigations of Trump and his associates. “It is not something the ...


70

Has Trump ever explained why he, as incumbent President, is unable to stop the alleged electoral fraud? As what is essentially an unfunded mandate, The US Constitution relegates control over voting in federal elections to the individual states. The federal government has little control over elections covered by states. There are federal level laws and court ...


68

The question isn't about what Trump can do to stop it. David covers that well, though a lot of things we thought Trump couldn't do he is doing. It is about Trump's own explanation about why he can't. Trump claimed "I have an Article 2, where I have the right to do whatever I want as president". The Attorney General, well after the election, has ...


49

The Trump campaign has launched a number of different lawsuits, some requesting that counting be stopped in certain states, others insisting that counting continue in other states. The CNN article you linked states: Trump's comments were especially remarkable since it appears that the President has a good chance of winning outstanding states in Pennsylvania,...


37

No, because none of the reasons you've given for why it might happen are true it seems likely to me that Trump won't leave the White House voluntarily. As JoeW says above, he has no choice. At most he can actively oppose the country being governed over the next couple of months, but that's it. When the time runs out, he can legally be removed, by force ...


32

As @dsollen’s excellent answer says, it seems extremely unlikely that the recount could materially change the election result. That answer suggests another, somewhat cynical, possible motive: to raise more money for Trump to pay off campaign debts. Another major possible motive is to promote the perception or belief that the election results are closer or ...


26

(Contra to Brian's answer) there were a few clashes, like this one in DC on Nov 14: The demonstrations unfolded peacefully for most of the day, but counterprotesters clashed with the president's supporters and violence erupted as night fell. Counterprotesters were seen overturning tables of vendors selling Trump merchandise, as well as stealing Trump hats ...


20

Trump is not sharing information, he is using his position as president to spread baseless lies about election fraud. Twitter has no obligation to enable that. A Twitter spokesman said via email: “As votes are still being counted across the country, our teams continue to take enforcement action on Tweets that prematurely declare victory or contain ...


17

No, there have been no such riots so far. (EDIT: The incident in Fizz's answer is the most notable exception I've seen so far.) For the reasons outlined in the question, an ongoing risk does exists to at least some limited degree. However, civil conflict is only likely if Trump takes actions to drastically intensify uncertainty about the transition of power. ...


14

From Donald Trumps twitter feed: He's talking about the things he perceives as fraudulent (counting in metropolitan areas without observers) and allowing votes to continue to come in after the polls officially closed.


13

If counting was stopped today (November 5th) then Biden might be leading, but it's just a paper-thin lead. Yes, Biden leads according to electoral votes in those states where the result is already more or less determined. But in many of those where counting still goes on and the results aren't crystal clear yet, the already counted votes show a Trump lead: ...


12

In the US, it is legal for private entities to censor or refuse to publish statements that they disagree with. Contrary to popular belief, the First Amendment only prevents the government from engaging in censorship. Twitter's refusal to publish or flagging of some statements and not others is a decision made solely by Twitter and its executives. Everyone ...


12

That tweet is probably referring to this complaint filed on 9th of November which is effectively calling into question the fairness and legality of some practices of some counties in the Pennsylvania election. The portion of the complaint he's probably referring to is the allegation that 682,479 mail-in ballots were illegal. Rather than engaging in an open ...


12

There has been some speculation that the goal is simply delay. If legal filings, even when they fail, can somehow delay the certification of the vote in a number of places, then the courts might wind up deciding the "winner" as they did in 2000. And if the lawyers for Trump can get a couple of conflicting rulings in the states, then there can be ...


11

The president-elect has no formal power or position in the government until he is inaugurated in January. However, the president-elect has influence. He can signal his plans and intentions, either publicly to the population or through informal, semi-private conversations with other leaders. Biden in particular has an extensive list of contacts in the US ...


11

One possibility is that he is searching for ammunition to use in a contingent election. If Biden doesn't have 270 electoral college votes by December 8th, the election will be decided by House delegations, of which Republicans control the majority. He could be looking for constitutional issues to take to court and reverse certification, or he could be ...


10

It's a tricky question and depends on the definition of "reasonable knowledge" or "good estimate". There are a range of possible scenarios in some of which we won't know the winner for weeks. But since you're specifically asking about the earliest possible moment, it would probably be when Florida reports its first results and they show ...


10

There's no legal method by which Trump could stay in office or extend his powers past January 20. Trump can't extend his term directly: the Constitution as amended by the Twentieth Amendment states that the president's term ends on January 20, and there is no mechanism for changing that short of another amendment, a procedure that the President has no part ...


10

Besides the (continuing) funding aspect that was covered in the accepted answer, some additional ones that have been raised in the press: Trump's ego/image. Does not want to be seen as having "gone down" without having exhausted every angle. Remember all the nicknames he put on competitors from "low energy" to "losers" etc. in ...


9

The Commander in Chief can discharge anyone in the army for reasons such as "unsuitability". But the President can only appoint Generals with the advice and consent of the Senate. By law, he can only appoint suitably qualified candidates (ie serving senior military officers) except at a time of war. This makes it difficult for the President to ...


9

I'm going to disagree with most of the other answers -- there is no grand strategy and Trump knows there is no path to victory. It's clear at this point none of this is about winning the election, but rather maximizing his position going forward once he leaves the White House. He has pretty obvious plans to move into media, which was the original plan in ...


8

Speculation in the New York Times is that it was selected because it was an outdoor location in a Trump-friendly part of town (Philadelphia, being a Democratic stronghold, doesn't have many of those). Prior press conferences in more traditional parts of Philadelphia, such as outside a courthouse or outside the elections office, had been disrupted by the ...


7

The only way that Donald Trump's current term can be extended is by amending the constitution. This requires the agreement of 2/3 of the House, 2/3 of the Senate, and 3/4 of the individual States to agree. There is no prospect of any of the above agreeing to such an amendment. It is worth noting that the quickest timeframe between an amendment being ...


7

He doesn't have a choice on January 20th at Noon Trump will no longer be president and will have no choice about leaving. https://www.constituteproject.org/constitution/United_States_of_America_1992 AMENDMENT XX The terms of the President and Vice President shall end at noon on the 20th day of January, and the terms of Senators and Representatives at noon ...


7

Trump can't stop the Electoral College from voting. What he might try to do is file lawsuits to keep a number of states from certifying their elections until after December 8, at which point he can contest the validity of the electors appointed (3 USC 5). If he can dispute the validity of enough electors (it looks like he'll need at least 37 of them), the ...


6

Granting such pardon would create really dangerous precedent for any future wannabe autocrat: try to gain unrestricted power, and in the case of the failure, next president will grant you pardon to avoid divisiveness. Instead, Biden is doing exactly right thing: let investigators to follow the law without any political interference, as Trump should have done....


6

No, there have not been any riots. Since that may seem surprising considering there are a lot of extremely invested people on both sides you need to consider the current overall position. At the moment both sides are being told "it's fine, the courts will take care of it." So Biden supporters are not happy about the situation and there have been ...


6

That's known as a "signing table". Trump himself has used it before in 2017, and even joked about it himself. Or at least the audience laughed at his comments. While the seal seems to be a more recent addition, there's a very similarly looking table being used by Reagan... well, to actually sign documents. President Reagan, Tom Lantos, Annette ...


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