328

Evidence That Trump Is Anti-Science There is plenty of evidence that the Trump administration is anti-science. For example: One of his first acts in office was to place a gag order on federal scientists reporting their results and removing their past scientific reports from government websites. Trump denies empirical evidence that torture is not an ...


228

TL;DR I have been as bi-partisan as possible. President Trump is attempting to discredit the media as they attempt to expose aspects of his administration they find worthy of journalism. Some may be driven by editorial bias however the majority are reporting genuine news-worthy stories, often using direct statements and quotes from the Trump ...


180

Because of the First Amendment to the United States Constitution: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. (emphasis mine) ...


165

Bottom Line Up Front Yes, there was violence perpetrated by both AntiFa and the White Supremacists. Ben Shapiro's show the day after properly highlights the violence on each side (specific parts showing violence will be referenced below). That there was violence on one side does not dismiss or excuse the violence on the other side. That there was violence ...


139

Culture. In the US denial of climate science has been turned into part of the 'culture wars'. As such it is part of identity of many on the political right to decry global warming as a left-wing invention made up for political ends. Any effect on reality, jobs or international relations is secondary. And it seems that unlike many things, like repealing ...


128

The answer to "what is wrong with kneeling" is symbolism. And more specifically, the question shouldn't be "what is wrong with kneeling" but instead "why do many people see it as wrong"; since there's no objective metrics of what's right or wrong, and the answer may very largely depend on one's ideological postulates. So, let's answer that second question -...


127

14th Amendment to the US Constitution, Section 1: All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the state wherein they reside. No state shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any ...


126

Antisemitism was central to the Holocaust, the reason for which was the desire to exterminate all Jews. To not acknowledge that fact when remembering the Holocaust is at least careless and it sends out a certain message, even if that message was not intended. It generalizes the Holocaust to a generic evil, and strips all context from it. The message ...


117

The majority party in the House of Representatives gets to appoint the Chairman of every sub-committee in the House, there are many of these. These chairmen are all Republicans, but will soon all be Democrats, every one of them. The ruling party needs no excuse to replace them, and all chairmen are always appointed from the ruling party. Each of these ...


114

Russian Hacks Technically, the US intelligence didn't claim that the Russians hacked the election itself. What they claimed was that the Russians ran a campaign to "undermine public faith in the US democratic process". They didn't hack into the voting machines to change the vote tallies and votes are still cast by Americans. Thus, the results are still ...


110

Because polling data and Trump's approval rating do not tell the whole story. As right-wing political commentator Ben Shapiro is fond of saying, two things can be true at once: It's entirely possible to both despise President Trump's character, bombastic personality, and divisive rhetoric AND simultaneously appreciate what he has done and is trying to ...


108

After the Crimea annexation, the social media trolling during the US election and the recent Skripal incident, the public image of the Russian government in the western world turned from bad to worse. So the comparison between Putin 2018, Putin 2012 and Medvedev 2008 is not necessarily appropriate. Trump is under suspicion of colluding with the Russian ...


106

No one has attempted to "reign in or remove the President" because he has not been found to have done anything illegal. These "politically motivated sackings" were not of elected officials or even people appointed by congress. They were political appointees in the executive branch, which the President is in charge of. Obama replaced George W. Bush ...


104

According to South Korea's National Security Chief, Chung Eui-yong, speaking to the press after a meeting about North Korea with President Trump on March 08, 2018: "I explained to President Trump that his leadership and his maximum pressure policy, together with international solidarity, brought us to this juncture. I expressed President Moon Jae-in’s ...


103

As of today (November 9th), the United States have not yet elected a president. They have elected an electoral college, which will elect a president on December 19th. Theoretically the electors could still change their mind and elect someone completely different. It is not unheard of that individual "faithless electors" vote different than mandated by the ...


98

You can think of the treasury of a government as a big pot of money. There are various streams of inputs (taxes, fees, fines, tariffs, new debt...) and lots and lots of streams of outputs (subsidies, welfare, wages for government employees, running cost of government departments, debt repayment, public construction projects, and many many more). But inside ...


89

It may seem like a tautology, but Trump is popular where he is popular. Such is the case with divisive figures. In order to remain in office, politicians in those areas where Trump is popular feel the need to heed the will of their own personal constiuency and embrace Trump. To be fair, an opinion I share is that some of the popularity that Trump receives ...


86

From the USA point of view there are two types of arguments. The first ones are those that state that the fewer nuclear capable countries there are, the better1: Fewer nuclear warheads at risk of being captured/sold to rogue actors. Non-nuclear countries are less of a worry if they become unstable. Every foreign country, no matter how friendly, is at the ...


85

The "raid", which is the execution of a search warrant, is under the jurisdiction of the US Attorney's Office of the Southern District of New York, not that of the Mueller investigation. Mueller presumably referred whatever prompted the warrant to Rosenstein (deputy US Attorney General and his direct supervisor) specifically because it doesn't necessarily ...


80

This is a great question, but it's really impossible to answer for certain at this point in time. Trump's current success is defying a lot of "conventional wisdom" about how primaries go. That said, the odds are good that your reason #2 is the most likely: "Donald Trump supporters fall under a category of people with whom I have little contact, at ...


80

In a word: no. The President cannot just order someone to prison. The Fourth Amendment prohibits unreasonable search and seizure except on probable cause of a crime being committed. The Fifth Amendment requires felony charges to be brought by a Grand Jury. The Sixth Amendment requires trial by jury for criminal cases.


77

Reasonable theories I have heard have included: A change in polling foundations (home phones become cell phones = limitations on traditional cold calling... and also the shift into online polls). Plus perhaps the diminishing patience people have with enduring the polling process (I believe the percentage of people who agree to it has dropped consistently) ...


73

The reason given publicly by members of the Trump administration was that Comey was dismissed due to the way he handled the investigation into Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server. Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein stated in a letter that: The Director was wrong to usurp the Attorney General's authority on July 5, 2016, and announce his ...


73

These are some of the reasons mentioned by Trump that support the withdrawal from the agreement. 1. It increases energy prices should the US follow through its goals. The United States hopes to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by 26-28 percent below the 2005 level in 2025, and also try to reduce emissions by 28 percent as per aims set out by the Obama ...


69

While the presumption is that most of the stories are disliked rather than false, note that some of the stories have been false. The New York Times reported that there was a pattern of communications between the Donald Trump campaign and Russian officials. The FBI told the White House that they have not found that. Yes, we only know this from the White ...


69

Yes, it has happened before. The following excerpt is from a France 24 article: Light moments are exceedingly unusual in the UN General Assembly, which follows a strict protocol in with [sic] each world leader is escorted to the rostrum for an address on issues of the day. In 2015, Zimbabwe's then 91-year-old strongman Robert Mugabe was met with ...


68

While Trump in general has been supportive of Putin and the Russian government, there are several specific policy reasons that they supported him. Trump will weaken US commitment to NATO For Vladimir Putin, the election of Donald Trump may undermine the NATO military alliance. Trump has said that the U.S. would not automatically defend its treaty allies ...


67

No. The power of a Presidential Pardon comes from the Constitution (Article II, Section 2) and there is no provision for undoing it.


66

What would we do instead? Keep Barack Obama? There is zero provision in the United States for delaying the inauguration. In fact, it's not even clear that the inauguration is legally necessary. At noon on January 20th, 2017, Obama is out and a new president replaces him. There's a ceremony, but the constitution does not include any mention of it. The ...


65

Apart from the legality, your assumptions are wrong. You assume that there is a thing that can objectively be called "fake news", and that it comprises of stories containing false facts which can be disproven by fact-checking. This is not the definition of "fake news" that Trump is using. Looking through his Twitter feed, we can see that he describes ...


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