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2

According to this article by The Guardian Trump seems to be credited for obtaining from Israel the suspension of their annexation plan: At Trump’s request, Israel “will suspend declaring sovereignty” over parts of the West Bank, it said. This would mean that the Trump administration played an important role in the deal, since this condition is presented ...


3

The bottom line is that a campaign is going to highlight an issue if they think it will resonate. Trump clearly believes this one does. The question then becomes: why might he think that? Biden has scaled back his public appearances to limit gaffes, and the article says that Democrat donors are concerned that he has "lost his mojo". This has ...


4

First, a lawsuit alleging some violation of a federal election law or the constitution would have to be brought in a state or federal court with jurisdiction over the state in which an irregularity was alleged. This is because the U.S. Supreme Court does not have jurisdiction to review questions of state law. Then, that case would be appealed from the trial ...


22

tl;dr: Yes, all vacancies that occurred in an election year while one party controlled both presidency and Senate were filled by that party, regardless of whether the vacancy occurred before or after the election. One vacancy in 1968 did not actually occur due to the way the resignation letter was phrased. A candidate was nominated nonetheless but a ...


22

There have been 29 total Supreme Court nominations during an election year throughout US history. In 19 of those cases, the President and the Senate were of the same party, and the nominee was confirmed 17 of those times. In 10 cases, the President and the Senate were of opposite parties, and only 2 were confirmed. So there is a lot of historical precedent ...


19

There haven't been very many election year nominations in history, particularly not recent history. Going back to 1900, there have only been six nominations to the Supreme Court during election years: 2016, 1940, 1932, 1916 (twice), and 1912 (excluding two of Johnson's nominations that were ultimately withdrawn) 1. Five of those were of the same party, and ...


5

We can go straight to the horse's mouth (as it were) and look at the Trump administration's claims of accomplishment on whitehouse.gov. The page itself is amateurish — a set of bullet points with no structure, a lot of redundancy, and the occasional lapse into a carnival barker's tone ("SEE the great accomplishments!!!") — but seems like an ...


3

A 9/14/20 Snopes article attributes the withheld funds to a bureaucratic error: It’s true that the Trump administration has been withholding money from the program, the result of what appears to be a bureaucratic blunder — namely, the way the Department of Treasury tracks and collects on debts owed to the federal government... ...The Department of Treasury’...


5

The reason why Trump is using this tactic is because it works. In 1988, George H. W. Bush ran an extremely successful campaign against Michael Dukakis. Like Trump, early in the campaign, Bush steeply trailed his opponent in the polls, sitting around 37% to Dukakis' 54%. At some point, the Bush campaign ran an ad that lampooned Dukakis by inserting grinding ...


11

I think this is, in part, due to the failure of the Hillary Clinton campaign in 2016. Part of the reason many believe she lost was due to her campaign's focus on attacking Trump's personality, instead of highlighting policy differences. Looking at this study on campaign ads from 2016, Clinton's ads were nearly all personal attacks - not policy. That is not ...


0

It may be that the Democratic party is trying to stay away from ad hominem attacks/fallacies. This is the kind of thing that can be simplistically described as an attack on a person because you don't have anything real to counter their arguments. Person A: Climate change is drastically changing how the weather interferes with business and even residential ...


19

For the Trump campaign, the aim is to project and deflect from concerns about Trump's own mental competence. For the Biden campaign, it's likely a combination of a desire to appear "above the fray" and a sense that everyone who can be moved by concerns about Trump's mental competence already has been. There's a popular quote attributed alternately ...


21

There are two different election strategies at play, mostly aimed at two different kinds of people. This is to be expected in most elections but the tunes that the two parties are playing are so obviously different this year that it is being noted. The Republican campaign essentially continued its strategy from 2016 with minor tweaks. Then, the key point of ...


27

The answer is consistency. If you look at videos of Trump campaigning 5 years ago he looks approximately the same as he looks today. His speech patterns in 2015 were odd, but they remain odd in 2020. Likewise his physical appearance remains similar - he started out looking unhealthy and continues to look so today, but not any worse than 4 years ago. ...


57

I suppose that I disagree with the framing of the question. I would argue that Trump's mental health and intelligence are frequently criticized. There are a plethora of news articles characterizing him as poorly educated, incurious, not terribly bright, or even possibly having some sort of mental illness. For instance, from the Atlantic, Trump does not read ...


3

Is there evidence for Col. Vindman being a “Never Trumper”? At the time of his testimony the answer was no per several other answers here, but there is now! Vindman is now a self-identified “Never Trumper”. Note however that the question was asked a year ago in an earlier context and this does not affect the several answers to the negative that were ...


93

Because the Trump campaign crossed a line in 2016. Before this point it was generally accepted, in American politics, that politicians and candidates did not use words such as "stupid" or "insane" when talking about one another. In return, it was fairly uncommon for the "proper" news media to use such terms when talking about ...


4

Were other American dignitaries expected to visit too? Did they make it? In addition to President Trump, the dignitaries mentioned are: White House Chief of staff John Kelly Military dignitaries Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Joseph Dunford Army Chief of Staff, General Mark Milley Supreme Allied Commander Europe, General Curtis ...


6

From what I can see on the web, then White House Chief of Staff John Kelly and Joint Chiefs of Staff Marine Gen. Joseph Dunford both attended; there are pictures here of them and their wives at the cemetery on November 10th. Undoubtably there were others in attendance as well, including the typical raft of photographers and media members. This was not the ...


14

Other answers about "testing" the system are close to the mark IMO; but based on my previous observation of Trump's MO: this is not about the election; this is about the campaign. Trump has many times in the past tried to sell a narrative of the American left - the Dems themselves, news media that supports them, Twitterati, bloggers, academics, etc....


4

Trump desires to ensure ballot integrity in a key electoral state. North Carolina is a swing state, so where majors parties win by thin margins, and a few uncounted votes can mean victory or defeat. Another interpretation of Trump's comment is to not actually vote twice, but to verify the vote was cast by trying to vote and being rejected to test the system. ...


3

It could potentially give a line of attack. "Why are Democrats making a big deal of what I said, they said that vote by mail is fine and would detect and fix any problems. They must know how easy fraud can happen!" At this point in the race, there is every indication that Biden is significantly ahead and likely to win absent any changes. He is ...


46

This is the modern mass-media era. Trump may have been speaking in North Carolina, but he — like any other national level candidate — is aware that he is speaking to the nation as a whole. Note that after he made this statement — as the article points out — he followed it with a tweet on the same subject, explicitly aimed at a national audience. If I were to ...


6

I'm not aware that there is any significance to making this suggestion to North Carolina voters. The methods to check for duplicate voting attempts appear to be fairly uniform as it applies to voting twice (once by mail, followed by another attempt in person). This video of the full exchange between Trump and a local broadcaster Link is useful to consider, ...


37

As the BBC article explains, Trump frequently makes baseless allegations that the election system is prone to fraud. The only thing unusual about this most recent remark is that he's encouraging his own supporters to commit voter fraud. He happened to be in North Carolina when he made these remarks, and it is relevant to know that Trump and Biden are neck-...


3

In fact, the official exit poll, as well as some post-election analyses of the state seem to indicate that - rather than Latino voters turning out to vote against Trump - he actually performed better with that demographic than Romney. FiveThirtyEight argues: In the lead-up to the election, there was a lot of talk about how Latinos would turn out in record ...


3

These are very small movements, probably within the margin of error. The most recent up-tick is mostly due to a Emerson college poll that put Trump approval on 48. This may be an outlier, it may be a post-convention bounce, or it may be the start of a trend. Only time will tell. Emerson is highly ranked pollster and this is a poll of likely voters, not all ...


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