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2

We’re Likely Seeing a ‘Rally Around The Flag’ Effect Nate Silver had a nice discussion of this here. The take home is that yes, Trump’s approval ratings are up right now, but this can likely be put down to a ‘rally around the flag’ effect where, in a crisis, leaders generally poll higher. This is a global phenomenon. However, due to the economic fallout ...


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Who has the authority to enforce isolation and quarantine because of a communicable disease?. The Federal government derives its authority for isolation and quarantine from the Commerce Clause of the U.S. Constitution. Under section 361 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S. Code § 264), the U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services is authorized to ...


6

It is typical that US presidents enjoy a boost in approval ratings at the beginning of any national crisis. HW Bush saw a 35 point boost through the beginning of the Gulf War Clinton had no major crises in his administration, so his approval rating was comparatively steady (only spiking, ironically, during his impeachment) W Bush saw a 40 point spike in ...


31

Trump has never had better ratings - but that's not the whole story. This analysis from the CBC shows a fuller picture. Donald Trump has the highest approval ratings since the first few weeks of his presidency. a 47% approval rating However he has also had the lowest approval ratings of any president on average, never once having had an approval rate ...


24

According to US media, they're actually rising: Yet Trump’s approval ratings — an important gauge of his re-election chances a bit over seven months away — are staying strong, by some counts even reaching highs for his tenure. Though whether this has permanent effects in the long term and on Trump's popularity in the U.S. overall remains to be seen. A ...


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There's nothing to reconcile. Pro-life doesn't mean 'against (needless) death', it means anti-abortion. [The same is true for the opposite label: Pro-choice means in favor of legal access to abortion, not necessarily in favor of all individual choices (eg regarding assisted suicide or drug policies).] People supporting "Pro-life" can still support the ...


0

This question likely will be moved to Skeptics.SE, but for the sake of answering it, Trump praises Putin: "[…] he's been a leader far more than our president has been a leader" — CNBC, Youtube video, 18 seconds Pence praises Putin: "I think it's inarguable that Vladimir Putin has been a stronger leader in his country than Barack Obama has been in ...


2

As OP and other answers suggest this is a kind of "Black Peter" game. It seems human to show with the fingers on others and in the middle age the Jews have been the scapegoat who should have poisoned the fountains ... And the Swine flu must have been the Mexican flu in Trumps perspective. It is true that in the past the flues and pandemics have been ...


14

In short? Because things descended into tribal pissing matches. One of the things that's been forgotten is, up until about a month ago, "Wuhan Virus" was an extremely common way of referring to the virus. The term shows up in headlines and articles and op-ed pieces left and right. For a fun exercise, put a news organization into google's search along ...


1

Society has mostly become more enlightened over time. Many practices that were common in the past are now considered anywhere from inadvisable to offensive to totally taboo. And even though racism and xenophobia have not been eradicated, overt expressions of it are generally avoided. Language is a huge component of this progression. Many names for medical ...


26

The question assumes incorrectly that the name Spanish Flu is, or ever was, somehow OK. It's true that we use it now without much of a second thought—once a name sticks, it sticks, and the Spanish Flu pandemic is long enough in the past that its use barely stigmatizes Spanish people today. Being harmless now does not mean the name was free of undesirable, ...


20

From a rather old book that I read, about syphilis: "He caught the disease which in England is called the French disease, in France the Spanish disease, in Spain the German disease, and in Germany the English disease". (Not sure of the ordering, but it was a cycle of these four countries). Yes, what Trump says is offensive. Just because lots of people in ...


12

I think the key point here is that all of these other cases refer to an outbreak. "Chinese virus" refers to the virus. It implies that the virus was somehow "made in China" when it clearly isn't. If Trump calls the epidemic "Chinese COVID-19 outbreak" I doubt there'd be as large a reaction.


1

The FDA doesn't regulate off-label use per se, but does [well, try to] regulate the advertisements for off-label use. Basically manufacturers are not "allowed" to do the latter, even though clinicians can still prescribe off-label. As an FDA document explains: the modern Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act) and FDA regulations prohibit ...


5

Descriptively speaking, Ted's answer is basically correct, insofar as it accurately captures the kind of thinking that leads a lot of people to consider the term "Chinese virus" offensive. However, normatively speaking, the kinds of arguments Ted is putting forward aren't as strong as you might think. It's always good to keep in mind that there's a variety ...


2

The successful phishing attack against John Podesta that caused the release of 44,053 DNC internal emails and 17,761 attachments likely had some effect on the outcome of the election. It led to some embarrassing revelations that were detrimental to the Clinton campaign. While one can't say how big effect the email release had, I think it's safe to say that ...


77

If you want official criticism from the WHO of what Trump did/said: [Question:] Dr Tedros mentioned the importance of international unity on this and I just wondered whether anyone there at WHO had comments about the US president Donald Trump's continued usage of the term, the Chinese virus, as recently as this morning to refer to COVID given that ...


214

Let's appreciate the learning curve. The problem with all of those historical names is that they created sharp spikes in prejudice, social ostracism, and violence against the indicated groups, and still create issues today as seen here with COVID-19. It's true that the first identified cases of Covid-19 occurred in Wuhan China, but this does not imply that ...


6

Considering today's assertion that FDA has now approved certain pharms, does it follow that these prescriptions are no longer "off-label", but rather are indicated uses? No. The president is not the FDA, and the president's statements about FDA actions are not FDA actions. The only official source of information about drug approvals is the FDA's list of ...


2

Search as I might, I could not find a 'non partisan' study of any credibility on the subject. 'Russian interference' was most seen in a series of FB ads, financed to the tune of around $200k, that were pretty much the standard fringe politics fare... unlikely to have any measurable effect on voting. They also supported Bernie Sanders with FB ads, too. ...


2

The answer to your question is that nobody knows for sure. There were a number of factors that lead to Trump’s EC win. The Comey letter in late October probably played a role [1]. But the effect of the Russian disinformation campaign on the net could have played a role as well [2]. And plain misogyny also likely had an impact [3]. The results were close ...


0

It would be good idea to define explicitly what is "threat of foreign interference" exactly. In this sentence all words are under question. First, threat always exist. There is a serious threat mankind will be not alive tomorrow. Second, what does it mean "foreign"? If Russians or Chinese living at US will decide they prefer one candidate over another due to ...


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