New answers tagged

2

TLDR: Almost all of the approximately 101 miles of "wall" that have been built so far, replaces existing infrastructure. The lengthy procedure to acquire permission to construct a barrier at these locations has definitionally already occurred, and these locations are more likely to be deserving of a barrier (otherwise, why would a barrier already be there?)...


0

A Lawfare post from July says Family separation has continued despite the end of a formal zero-tolerance policy. But it doesn't say when it was formally dropped. It also says that it was probably never really in effect for any appreciable period of time: The number of prosecutions are still a relatively small proportion of total apprehensions per ...


3

My question is, how has that situation changed since September 2019? How many miles of fencing have been built in areas where there was no fencing before? Maybe 8 miles, though probably less. Under Construction in Texas: The First New Section of Border Wall (Paywall), Nov. 8, 2019. Eight miles of original fencing are going up in the Rio Grande Valley, ...


-1

Court's earlier (December 5th) order shows that the DOJ admitted that an FBI attorney had altered evidence submitted to the court to conceal relevant information. That single fact amounts to a fraud against the Court which renders the court's actions following that fraud void. Concluding that the warrants were invalid doesn't require a legal genius, to ...


3

It was a direct result of the FISA court hearing about the two warrants. It would appear the lawyers representing the Justice department made the determination during the hearing. The Department of Justice admitted in December that two of the FBI’s four surveillance warrants to electronically monitor ex-Trump campaign adviser Carter Page were invalid, ...


1

There seems to be a statement from the White House itself saying some details: A White House statement said that in the phone call on Monday, Trump “recognized Field Marshal Haftar’s significant role in fighting terrorism and securing Libya’s oil resources, and the two discussed a shared vision for Libya’s transition to a stable, democratic political ...


36

Personal lawyers are paid for by the President himself while the federal government pays for lawyers from the Office of the White House Counsel (see this WH document for their salaries). Legal teams outside of the Office of the White House Counsel cannot be covered using taxpayers' funds: The White House did not respond this week to requests for comment ...


26

Currently, anyone spending less than 20% of their time engaged in lobbying can call themselves an "adviser" or "consultant". Trump says this a loophole that must be closed. I couldn't find anything on this specifically. 2.The Republican candidate wants a five-year ban preventing government officials who have recently departed the government from ...


4

Since the question was re-refocused on the proper use of the term, I'll just quote Merriam Webster: Does impeach mean "to remove from office"?: Usage Guide Verb Testimonial evidence indicates that references to (and calls for) "impeaching" a public official are commonly understood to refer not simply to charging that official with misconduct "...


3

You are correct, that the verdict in the Senate does not change the fact that a president has been impeached. Search for "impeached presidents" and you will get Andrew Johnson and Bill Clinton, neither of which were removed. There is a technical argument that this president hasn't been impeached yet, because the Articles of Impeachment have not been ...


8

I find it best to use a similar process in law in order to describe the effective difference. In criminal law, the process of responding to the commission of a felony goes: An officer responds to the immediate crime. A detective investigates the crime scene, witnesses, etc, and interviews suspects until s/he has found someone s/he believes has committed ...


5

There are several areas where things get confusing. The most common issue is that impeachment is used commonly to only refer to successful removal. This isn't an accurate usage as unsuccessful removal is still an impeachment. For past impeached Presidents the terminology is usually used correctly to refer to those the House voted to impeach. A more ...


27

Impeachment is used to describe two different but related events: Formally, impeachment happens when the House passes the vote to do so. This is how it is defined in the Constitution, and how lawyers will use the term. Most of the public uses the phrase that "the President has been impeached" only after he has been impeached and convicted. Similar to that ...


18

It depends how you define "strike", but the North Korean capture of USS Pueblo came after the Cuban crisis. And during the capture Pueblo came under fire, resulting in the death of one crew: The North Korean vessels attempted to board Pueblo, but she was maneuvered to prevent this for over two hours. A submarine chaser then opened fire with a 57 mm cannon,...


2

"Beneficial" in what way? It's within the President's powers to act as he did. Therefore there isn't anything, on the surface, about the Soleimani strike that would be impeachable. Impeachment is, among other things, a political trial. There has never been a chance that Trump would be removed from office. It would require 20 Republican Senators to join all ...


1

With the audit results now released, it seems pretty clear the answer is no, the 2019 audit of FBI Confidential Human Sources (CHS) processes was not prompted by President Trump, nor any of his appointees. As stated in the final report: "This audit primarily covers the FBI's CHS program from fiscal year (FY) 2012 through May 2019." It appears to be follow-...


Top 50 recent answers are included