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11

The premises of your question are wrong. Lets start with the title. "Legalising dangerous drugs". The danger of marijuana is debatable. Alcohol and Tobacco are equally if not more dangerous (as I will show later). So it puts the people at risk of facing drugs even against their will. How so? I've never had to take any drugs -- including Tobacco ...


8

States can pass whatever laws they wish (see Republican states with abortion bans), they're just subordinate to Federal law. In this case, it's a detente achieved through executive discretion. The Obama administration said it wouldn't seek to arrest users in states where it's legal The Obama administration said Thursday that it would not challenge laws ...


4

Personally, I don't think so. The Mexican Drug war has been going on since December 2006 (though the overall War on Drugs implemented by the United States has been going on much longer). While several drug cartels have been eliminated, such as the Knights Templar Cartel that was destroyed in 2017, many cartels still exists and multiple gangs continue to get ...


3

August 2020 Update In light of the severe impact of the pandemic, it is probably fair to say that every country is reassessing the approval process for new vaccines to a greater or lesser degree. According to the WHO, as of 13th of August 2020, six vaccines are in Phase III trials, and 16 are between Phase I-II. Phase III trials are essential because they ...


2

In 1933 there were a series of elections to choose delegates to state conventions to ratify (or not) the 21st amendment to the constitution, which legalised alcohol. For example in New Jersey 226 delegates were chosen and voters were able to vote for slates of candidates that were "for repeal" or "against repeal". Thus although this was ...


2

There are many classes of activities that can prompt prosecution under both state and federal law. For instance, there is a federal law against assaulting USPS employees, but assault in general is prohibited by state law. When it comes to drugs, there are often state laws that might replicate federal law, be more lenient, or in some cases be more harsh. If ...


2

You have to understand that TSA is (at best) a bunch of civilians that took a training course one weekend. They're not the night-vision automatic-rifle wielding CPB narcotics teams tossing flash-bangs through windows or the USCG raiding a container ship in the middle of the ocean. One thing you have to consider here is that TSA is a fairly young agency under ...


2

First, marijuana hardly classifies as 'dangerous'. Alcohol and tobacco are far more dangerous — to oneself and to others, according to every clinical study — and both those drugs are legally available over the counter. Marijuana was scheduled as a class 1 drug mainly for political reasons. conservatives in the Vietnam war era associated marijuana with ...


1

There is a ton of research on various questions related to this, and I'm not familiar with it in any detail. I'll just point you to a few examples of meta-studies, which each review the results of many other studies. "Does drug education work?" (2000) Recent research indicates that certain drug education programmes do stop or delay the onset of ...


1

Many victimless crimes are crimes because they may lead to criminal acts on a person when a victim may have little ability to give consent. Assisted suicide is considered by some to be a victimless crime, but the problem is that suicide can be caused by mental illness and depression. Did the person have the ability to truly give consent or not? Depending on ...


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