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Why is "creating jobs" seen as good and "destroying jobs" seen as bad, even when there are major labour shortages?

The arguments about the work force shortage are often exaggerated. The employer often wants a long work experience, formal education (where appropriate), all very precisely matching the expected work ...
Stančikas's user avatar
1 vote

Why is "creating jobs" seen as good and "destroying jobs" seen as bad, even when there are major labour shortages?

tlder Most economists agree that, in a healthy economy, jobs will be both created and destroyed. Typically the destruction is directly tied to creation, in a process known as "Creative ...
Charlie Evans's user avatar
3 votes

Why is "creating jobs" seen as good and "destroying jobs" seen as bad, even when there are major labour shortages?

The real (political) benefit of creating jobs is not in the jobs themselves but rather in the fact that a job being undertaken by a person means that person is paid a salary and can hopefully support ...
Kafein's user avatar
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12 votes

Why is "creating jobs" seen as good and "destroying jobs" seen as bad, even when there are major labour shortages?

People do "destroy jobs". We just use a better-sounding name: increasing productivity. Productivity is measured in GDP/hour worked, and increasing it results in more output for the same ...
user71659's user avatar
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7 votes

Why is "creating jobs" seen as good and "destroying jobs" seen as bad, even when there are major labour shortages?

Creating jobs is inherently desirable, because creating jobs tends to reduce unemployment and increase wages, even when the job market is tight, which improves the well-being of average people. There ...
ohwilleke's user avatar
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3 votes

Why is "creating jobs" seen as good and "destroying jobs" seen as bad, even when there are major labour shortages?

Why is job destruction/creation still seen as bad/good when existing vacancies cannot be filled today (except perhaps by mass immigration)? Wouldn't a pro-business politician more sensibly support ...
NoDataDumpNoContribution's user avatar
24 votes

Why is "creating jobs" seen as good and "destroying jobs" seen as bad, even when there are major labour shortages?

Labor is not a fungible good. When people say that there is a labor shortage (or high unemployment) in a country, then that does not mean that: all professions are affected equally all areas are ...
Philipp's user avatar
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0 votes

Why is "creating jobs" seen as good and "destroying jobs" seen as bad, even when there are major labour shortages?

The claim of "staff shortages" is largely a propaganda claim. It is a way of describing that the reserve army of labour has shrunk to the point that capitalist profits are being hurt (in a ...
Steve's user avatar
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Importance of the Middle East to Western and global economies

This isn't an exact answer to your Q, but relevant enough, I suspect How big would Big Oil be if it were a country? To figure this out, we took a look at their annual revenue—a closer approximation ...
the gods from engineering's user avatar
0 votes

Importance of the Middle East to Western and global economies

Middle eastern oil while not a mineral is particularly important to Europe since they don't have a domestic oil supply, but even if that wasn't the case middle eastern oil would still be vital to the ...
Calle Åström's user avatar
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Do chemical-biological problems benefit capitalism?

So are mental illnesses a big benefit for capitalism as Mark Fisher said? I would say no, and I think this misunderstands the nature of the claim. The vested interests under capitalism benefit from ...
Steve's user avatar
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3 votes

Do chemical-biological problems benefit capitalism?

I think there is a glimmer of truth here, but paired with a number of dubious implications. What is true: drugs addressing biochemical factors in mental health are a big business. So by a loose ...
Obie 2.0's user avatar
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1 vote

How many people can Gaza support after the last six months of fighting?

how many people could Gaza provide a home to, in remotely tolerable conditions, with perhaps six months of rebuilding Frame challenge: how is the question even relevant if they can't escape the zone? ...
the gods from engineering's user avatar
1 vote

Two years after the breakout of Ukraine war, is/how is Russia successful in sustaining its economy (now even growing?) and the war?

We have been vocal in our frustration that sanctions enforcement has been sluggish at best, if not downright inept, with under-resourced and blatantly outmatched mid-level bureaucrats scratching their ...
Sayaman's user avatar
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0 votes

Does it harm a country/society/economy to destroy a large amount of their money?

How might it harm a society to destroy some of its money? (For example, by burning a large quantity of cash.) Money vs cash Money and cash are not the same thing. There exist different measures of ...
FourLegsGoodTwoLegsBad's user avatar
0 votes

Does it harm a country/society/economy to destroy a large amount of their money?

Question: How might it harm a society to destroy some of its money? (For example, by burning a large quantity of cash.) Cash supply, how much currency is in the economy has historically been tied to ...
JMS's user avatar
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0 votes

Does it harm a country/society/economy to destroy a large amount of their money?

The effect of destroying "money" depends on a multitude of different factors. Like how much are you burning, how is the money distributed within the country and outside of the country, who ...
haxor789's user avatar
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0 votes

Does it harm a country/society/economy to destroy a large amount of their money?

Coins And Notes Assuming a 50€ note. Money have two values: Material value is low (0.5€cent maybe) due to an industrial process of printing money. Exchange value (50€), at a commonly determined ...
Grim's user avatar
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