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81 votes
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What does North Korea gain from making voting compulsory?

In "democracies" where the votes are meaningless (for example, because there is only one candidate, opposition candidates don't get fair treatment or votes are cast under intimidating ...
Philipp's user avatar
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44 votes
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Are there any examples of elected bodies where representatives with equal titles have actually different "weight" to their votes?

Are there any real-world examples of such legislative bodies, where two different members of the same body have different "weights" behind their votes? Yes. The Council of the European ...
cpast's user avatar
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41 votes
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What's the point of US presidential polls that poll people in general rather than dividing them by state?

Initial Considerations why do so many polls simply aggregate the voters rather than segment into states? Is a generic population based poll that interesting? One reason to do a national poll is that ...
ohwilleke's user avatar
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31 votes

Who are the weird characters behind George Galloway in his Rochdale elections victory speech?

The man in the yellow and black striped tie, and a top hat with multiple pairs of glasses is Ravin Rodent Subortna, the Monster Raving Loony Party candidate. Behind the Reform party candidate is a man ...
James K's user avatar
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24 votes

What does North Korea gain from making voting compulsory?

There are three main reasons. First, political scientists and psychologists who have studied voting in one party regimes find that people who cast votes, even if they have no choice about whom they ...
ohwilleke's user avatar
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23 votes

Are there any examples of elected bodies where representatives with equal titles have actually different "weight" to their votes?

A minor, but important example was the Nassau county board. It had six members with weighted votes. Hempstead #1: 9 Hempstead #2: 9 North Hempstead: 7 Oyster Bay: 3 Glen Cove: 1 Long Beach: 1 But ...
James K's user avatar
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23 votes

Who are the weird characters behind George Galloway in his Rochdale elections victory speech?

Based on similar lineups for victory speeches in other constituencies, these are most likely what the press calls 'joke candidates'. Similar lineup with more famous MPs (at the lectern) Boris Johnson ...
against very long user names's user avatar
18 votes
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What is Rishi Sunak's reasoning/incentive to talk of a hung parliament, rather than a Labour majority, right now?

Rishi Sunak's party performed badly in the local elections and is widely expected to do the same at a general election. He has to acknowledge this, but if he says "well, everyone, we're heading ...
alexg's user avatar
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18 votes

Has a party in the UK ever won parliament while losing the popular vote?

In 1951, the Conservatives took 321 seats with 13,717,851 votes while Labour took just 295 seats with 13,948,385 votes. That is, Labour had more votes but the Conservatives won more seats. It happened ...
Josiah's user avatar
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16 votes
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Does Germany hold by-elections?

Yes, Germany does hold by-elections in the case when a constituency nominee dies between being nominated and the election, but when an MP dies or withdraws from the Bundestag they are simply replaced ...
CDJB's user avatar
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16 votes
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What Is Behind The Puzzling Timing of the U.S. House Vacancy Election In Utah?

Elections for members of Congress are governed, in part, by US law, in particular, the Military and Overseas Voter Empowerment Act (MOVE Act). The act imposes certain time frames to allow for the ...
Rick Smith's user avatar
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15 votes

Do more legislative seats make Gerrymandering harder?

A map is a function assigning voters to districts such that each district has equally many voters. A seat goes to the majority candidate in the district. The map with the highest number of seats for ...
meriton's user avatar
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15 votes
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How does the CCP prevent the minority parties from obtaining too many seats and is there a hard cap on how many seats they can get?

Elections for the NPC seats are (largely) indirect. Additionally the wider NPC has less power in practice than in theory. Its members don't get a paycheck unless on the Standing Committee. Regular ...
against very long user names's user avatar
13 votes

What does North Korea gain from making voting compulsory?

Something that doesn't seem to be mentioned in the other answers is that turning out to vote acts like registration time in school, in that everyone is expected to attend, and everyone who attends is ...
Steve's user avatar
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13 votes
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Why is it legal for a candidate to fund raise for a PAC, given that PACs aren't supposed to coordinate with them?

Private coordination on expenditures is banned. As for coordination on fundraising activities, some rules seem to be described on these pages from the FEC's website: Fundraising for Super PACs by ...
sumelic's user avatar
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11 votes

How do parties really choose candidates in the US?

U.S. elections are complex, especially presidential ones, which have several layers of indirection. Because of the complexity of the question, I'm going to focus on the case of presidential elections. ...
sumelic's user avatar
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11 votes

Do more legislative seats make Gerrymandering harder?

Suppose you are drawing d districts in a population of a voters for party A and b voters for party B. Suppose that A is the majority party and we are trying to gerrymander for the benefit of party B. ...
Peter Olson's user avatar
11 votes

What range of rules are used in major democracies to limit candidate eligibility for high office?

There are 4 main classes of restrictions: Age-based restrictions limit eligibility to people over a certain age. Citizenship and residence restrictions only permit people holding certain citizenship ...
10 votes

Are there any examples of elected bodies where representatives with equal titles have actually different "weight" to their votes?

Federal Council (Bundesrat) of Germany The Federal Council is the second chamber of the German Parliament. It represents the governments of the sixteen member states. Each government has a different ...
ccprog's user avatar
  • 8,349
8 votes

What does North Korea gain from making voting compulsory?

Voting was de facto compulsory in Stalinist USSR. E.g. in 1950 "Of the 111,116,378 eligible voters, 111,090,010 came to vote." And North Korea already claims similar stats; for instance they ...
against very long user names's user avatar
8 votes

Voter turnout and confidence in results

A vote is not an opinion poll. Instead of extrapolating the behavior of a subset of people to everyone, it measures the behavior of all people. The conclusion from a vote is that set out by the rules, ...
ccprog's user avatar
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7 votes

How can Herbert Kickl be "the odds-on favorite" with a "personal approval rating.. among the lowest of any Austrian politician’s"?

A Freedom party win would make Kickl the most likely Chancellor. In multi-party democracies the leader of the party with most votes normally becomes the "Chancellor" or "Prime Minister&...
James K's user avatar
  • 121k
7 votes

What's the point of US presidential polls that poll people in general rather than dividing them by state?

There are many polls for individual states, which you can see in 538 by clicking the dropdown box under "State": Examples: Florida: Pennsylvania: And, importantly, when it gets closer to ...
user103496's user avatar
  • 5,553
7 votes

Why do AAP do well in local election but not in general election of Delhi?

This would seem to be an extreme case of the situation that often occurs in countries that use first past the post. In FPTP, votes for third and alternative parties are often "wasted" in ...
James K's user avatar
  • 121k
7 votes

What is Rishi Sunak's reasoning/incentive to talk of a hung parliament, rather than a Labour majority, right now?

alexg's answer is excellent, but in addition there's the mechanics of FPTP elections and the nature of campaigning and a strong tendency to campaign and vote negatively. The Conservatives are not only ...
Julia Hayward's user avatar
7 votes

What is Rishi Sunak's reasoning/incentive to talk of a hung parliament, rather than a Labour majority, right now?

Because the Conservatives believe that their surprise majority in 2015 was in a large part due to their scaremongering about a potential hung Parliament and the prospect of a Labour-SNP pact, and ...
Jack Aidley's user avatar
6 votes

Turkish elections: How to explain the anomalous fingerprints

What are the possible explanations for the election fingerprint of Ankara and Hatay to look bimodal whereas Istanbul and Izmir don't? There are parts of each city that strongly favor one party, and ...
ohwilleke's user avatar
  • 81.4k
6 votes

How do "opposition parties" in the North Korean parliament get their seats?

All candidates are chosen by the Democratic Front for the Reunification of Korea, the single coalition to which all members of parliament and all parties in parliament, as well as some civic ...
ohwilleke's user avatar
  • 81.4k
6 votes

Does Germany hold by-elections?

A supplement to CDJB's answer: The term "By-Election" for German "Nachwahl" is used in this older English version of the Bundeswahlgesetz. But there are some peculiarites that ...
ccprog's user avatar
  • 8,349

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