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4

There are a variety of places to get data from the most recent elections and from current elections, but you can get election data from the UK Parliament from this website: https://commonslibrary.parliament.uk/tag/elections-data/.


8

If you want up to date data for the most recent elections, you'll need to pick it up from a variety of different places, for example, councils have data on their own elections. Newspapers carry some of this information, and Wikipedia will compile it If you want the data sets from past elections gathered into one place, you can download this from the ...


4

In Australia, the senate elections have been counted electronically for quite some time, with the software having existed in some form since at least 2003 (see the submission linked in the annotation) and said precursor was used for the 2004 election. [2] It is also used for commercial vote counting services provided by the AEC. [3][4] A video series "...


4

No, all ballots in those countries are still counted by hand. While machines are getting better at being able to recognise written numbers, they're by no means perfect yet (and not yet better than humans at it).


-3

1824 is the best example. This tie was not a traditional tie, it is the type of "tie" that happened in the regular Senate election in Georgia in 2020: there was one candidate who won a plurality of both popular and electoral votes, and another candidate was selected. The problem was that the plurality was not also a majority.


2

No. There is no meaningful link between the duration of an elected official's term and corruption. In general, almost by definition, corruption is something that subverts the formal rules, so changing the formal rules wouldn't make a difference. This isn't to say that term of office durations don't matter, or that all choices are equally good. But, they ...


5

From the Iowa Secretary of State, Candidate FAQ, What occurs if the election results in a tie? Generally, when a tie occurs between two candidates, lots are drawn (i.e. a name is pulled out of a hat) to determine the winner. In Election Laws of Iowa 2020, 50.44 Tie vote. If more than the requisite number of persons, including presidential electors, are ...


6

Concession in the US presidential election is a political courtesy, not a constitutional obligation. It is common practice in the United States for the losing candidate to concede as soon as the election results from the states are published and their defeat becomes obvious. Note that at that point they technically didn't lose the election yet, because the ...


2

No - as Joe C points out, the regional and constituency ballots are now on separate pieces of paper making it impossible to pair up the ballots at the count. Indeed, the Electoral Commission's "easy guide" to the count states that the ballots are separated by contest before counting: Depending on the space available at the count centre, ballot ...


3

No, because it would be impossible to enforce. The two votes are on two separate ballots on two separate pieces of paper. It is therefore impossible to tell, given a constituency ballot, whether the person cast a valid regional ballot (or vice versa).


4

Because it's not designed for this purpose. Different politicians have different personalities. To take two GOP Governors at random, there are some people who would vote for Spencer Cox (R-UT) but not Tate Reeves (R-MS), and others who are the reverse. Therefore, you cannot compare partisanship off the back of a Gubernatorial vote because the candidates ...


0

If the electoral system doesn't count any preference for one or the other party when you vote the coalition, then you need to look at other parameters that should suggest indirectly the weight of each party inside the coalition. The solution Count the weight of each party based on the number of donations (not the amount) obtained from different people and in ...


18

Assuming (everyone in) the electorate knows the probability distribution of votes for the candidates and votes strategically, and assuming this distribution has no ties (whatsoever), Duverger's law can be derived formally as a limit when the electorate is infinite, i.e. there being only a two-party equilibrium in such case; see Palfrey (1989): we show that ...


0

It isn't impossible for a third-party or independent candidate to win a Presidential election. However, it is very unlikely for several reasons. First, a candidate needs lots of media attention in order to win. If the major news media organizations (Fox News, CNN, CNBC, NBC News, etc.) don't mention a candidate frequently, most voters won't know he exists. ...


0

One reason is to stop people who aren't running as serious politicians. Given that politics in the broadest sense, that is engaging in public life towards collective ends is one of the highest goods, it can be argued that it should be made as widely available as possible and this suggests that there should be no financial penalties associated with it. In ...


2

A party is different from the individuals that comprise it. And the platform of a party is often different from the platforms of the politicians that lead the party. A party allows a spectrum of opinion whilst subscribing to some basic essential principles. It is part of politics to learn the art of compromise and the art of not compromising, this is part ...


1

Nothing prevents this, other than the likelihood that the candidate will not get enough support, and ultimately votes, to win the primary & general elections. But it can happen, if the candidate can muster enough resources. We really don't have to look further than the election of Donald Trump, despite many of his positions being opposed to long-held ...


32

Primaries. Each party (usually - exact election mechanics vary depending on election locality and office; the rest of this answer assumes Presidential election) has its own primary "election" in the lead-up to the actual election where they decide which candidate they will endorse in the upcoming election. Typically, they choose to back someone who ...


12

What prevents them is voters, which is an imperfect mechanism and occasionally leads to embarrassing things like ultra-conservative Lyndon Larouche candidates winning the Democratic primaries for Lieutenant Governor and Secretary of State in 1986. In this instance, it was speculated that it was a consequence of low-information voters picking the simple-...


10

Generally speaking there is nothing that physically or legally prevents this. However, the whole point of primaries and other nominating processes is, in part, to perform exactly this filtering. Primary elections are frequently contested affairs with candidates campaigning directly against each other - including doing opposition research on each other. To ...


3

Elect 1 representative from each department. Final electees draw straws (or other fair/random choice mechanism) to choose which 3 serve. If these positions are not lifetime appointments, you can set up a rotation such that each department is only unrepresented for 1 term in 4.


9

Don't elect them all at once. Our department has four different, equally sized groups, governed by a committee of three people. (It needs to be odd so that votes are never tied.) However the elections are staggered so that we only elect one person at a time, and the department just tries to vote on who they think is the best candidate. There can be a ...


5

The electoral criterion you proposed seems very odd to me and can potentially lead to a wildly un-representative outcome no matter how you design it. For this reason, I would recommend the following changes. 1) Increase the number of seats to at least 4. Given that there are 4 departments (constituencies), the bare minimum of representative should be 4, ...


4

Only three representatives over four departments? Weird... At any rate, some variant of ranked choice voting is likely best for your purposes: you can put as many candidates as you like on the ballot, and the least popular will drop off naturally without feeling like they've been excluded. The example they give on Ballotpedia is for a single-winner race; if ...


13

Probably the most easily understandable method is approval voting. Each person can vote "yes" or "no" on each candidate individually. Then, you order from most votes to least, and take individuals if someone from their department has not already been elected. Depending on how complicated you can get with your voters, you could expand to ...


0

The Australian system uses majority preference instant run-off voting and awards public funding via the number of first preference votes. The amount payable is calculated by multiplying the number of first preference (i.e., primary) votes received by the rate of payment applicable at the time. The rate is indexed every six months in line with increases in ...


0

As you note, in situations involving coalitions identifying which votes were for which party can be unclear. Not least because voters may not care. Voters may have an attitude of "I'm a centrist. I'll vote for either party, and now that they are in a formal coalition, I won't have to choose between them. It is therefore impossible to tell from the ...


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