New answers tagged

-1

undermine /ʌndəˈmʌɪn/ verb 1. erode the base or foundation of (a rock formation). "the flow of water had undermined pillars supporting the roof" Similar: erode wear away eat away at chip away undercut Opposite: shore up support 2. lessen the effectiveness, power, or ability of, especially gradually or insidiously. "this could undermine years ...


-3

Apart from the reasons presented above, there can be another one: being afraid of one candidate more than being afraid of the other candidate. Say Russia is afraid candidate B will declare war on Russia or it will declare war on Iran, affecting the trade of Russia with Iran. Or the candidate will increase hostility against Russia. In the same time Russia is ...


-3

They would gain what Israeli already has. Imagine Putin addressing Congress as Netanyahu has. An organization that would promote pro-Russian policies as with AIPAC promoting pro-Israel policies, instead of people being indicted. Imagine dozen of Congressmen being of both Russian and US citizenship, as is the case with Israel.


0

Robert Reich has an awesome video explaining the answer to your question; it goes thru half a dozen points of direct benefits to Russia with a weakened and untrusted US. The video is titled "Trump and Putin | Robert Reich". The other thing mentioned in some books and sources is Putin holds a personal grudge against the US for humiliating the USSR ...


-6

Russia would benefit from a Trump election specifically because he is an outsider to the deep state, has independent personal funding, has a businessman approach to international relations, wants less globalisation and more of a national, domestic focus, and is opposed to war and military adventure abroad. All in all this makes for a president that is less ...


13

It also served Mr. Putin's interests to show his own constituency that democracy itself is not that wonderful, and that a strong (perpetual?) leader with a plan is better than the wasteful and divisive political campaigns of Western democracies. This was argued in an article in The Economist published on the day of the 2016 elections: Whoever wins the ...


9

It's difficult to definitively prove some of the reasons, because in order to do that we'd have to have access to Trump's financial records. The first thing I would say in terms of "what do they have to gain" is to look at major events that have unfolded over the past few years, and see how much Russia has been able to do whatever they felt like. ...


26

There are two potential gains from interfering in another nation's elections: Gaining political influence: Nation A might interfere in Nation B's elections in order to put in power someone sympathetic to Nation A's interests. This has been a fairly common practice with underdeveloped nations, where a major power works to install a government that will bow ...


3

Vladimir Putin (lets be clear when we say "Russia", we primarily mean one man) is motivated to interfere to make himself look good, and to create fear of the other. As Machiavelli said, "Men are driven by two principal impulses, either by love or by fear". Trump has been relatively sympathetic towards Russia compared to other US ...


31

Russia would benefit from weakening the United States because that will prevent the US from interfering with Russian actions in the Russian near abroad and from formenting a color revolution in Russia itself. Personally I do believe in the former but not in the latter. But it does not matter what I believe as long as Russia is afraid, see this RAND study. ...


6

Yes, in the last three contested Democratic primaries, the winner in NH did not win the national nomination. 2020 was contested, and won in NH by Sanders. Biden won the national nomination. 2016 was contested, and won in NH by Sanders. Clinton won the national nomination. 2012 was uncontested. 2008 was contested, and won in NH by Clinton. Obama won the ...


6

In terms of official policies of the modern Republican Party that deter a number of Black voters, they are not too hard to find. For instance, voter ID laws are widely perceived as an attempt to disenfranchise African Americans, and at least in 2014 many Republicans were publicly expressing their support for such laws. The American Legislative Exchange ...


14

This answer is freely adapted from a post from last year by Kevin Drum. In 2012, after Mitt Romney’s defeat, the Republican National Committee identified the demographic problem faced by the GOP: In 1980, exit polls tell us that the electorate was 88 percent white. In 2012, it was 72 percent white….According to the Pew Hispanic Center, in 2050, whites will ...


6

Yes, he can. Other answers are assuming a slightly different question of "Can Trump force the Congress by legal means?". But the question has no mention of "legal means". Considering how many times the current administration broke the Constitution and other laws, it's naive to assume they will limit themselves only to constitutional means....


1

In Germany, parties run primaries. They are required by law (and ultimately by the constitution) to follow democratic principles, but they are generally only open to dues-paying party members and the dates are set by the parties. Often party conventions are called on several levels. Grassroots members elect delegates to a convention, which elects either ...


2

While I make no claim to being a Constitutional lawyer, under a simple reading of the law it seems that if elections weren't held until after January 3rd (or whenever their term ends), there would BE no House of Representatives, thus the present Speaker of the House (Pelosi) couldn't become President. Since the Senate is a continuing body (about 1/3 of ...


21

Article 2, Section 3 of the constitution details the two things a President can force Congress to do (emphasis mine): He shall from time to time give to the Congress Information on the State of the Union, and recommend to their Consideration such Measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient; he may, on extraordinary Occasions, convene both Houses, or ...


41

The President has no legal power to force Congress to do anything of the sort besides his soft-power "bully pulpit" to try and force them to come to vote. It's important to note that in the US system, elections are not rescheduled with the ease or frequency of parliamentary systems, making changing the election date difficult for even a highly ...


20

Under the order of succession, the next person to become president would be the Speaker of the House. But her term ends at the same time as the President and Vice President. Most of your understanding is correct, but this line is wrong, and that's where the answers you're looking for come from. The 20th amendment says: Section 1 The terms of the President ...


24

Even ignoring demographics there is still a key reason here. https://www.sentencingproject.org/news/5593/ In “Growth in the U.S. Ex-Felon and Ex-Prisoner Population, 1948 to 2010,” Sarah Shannon and colleagues estimate that one-third of black men had a felony conviction in 2010 Not only do many states outright ban felons voting, but once the bans expire ...


21

The Republicans were very successful at gerrymandering in states where they started with a majority and they used racial data to do it. It's called Project REDMAP. For example, Georgia: In 2016, the overall state percentage of voters was 45.35% for Clinton and 50.44% for Trump, which seems like a moderately close race. But only 5 out of 14 representatives ...


64

Using the Cooperative Congressional Election Study 2018, we can test your hypothesis that non-African Americans skew as far to the Republicans as African Americans do to Democrats. Let's limit ourselves firstly to voters in the deep south, which I'll define as Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, & South Carolina. This gives us a survey population ...


14

Mississipi, for example is about 60% white 35% black (and small numbers of other racial groups) In 2016, the state was comfortably Republican, with Trump winning 57% of the vote. so let's run the numbers, assuming that 90% of the black vote was Democrat, and that there were no significant differences in voter turn out, what percentage of of the non-black ...


7

You are correct. There is a slight but significant racial turnout gap and Republicans consistently win low percentages of the black vote. Combine that with general demographics and it is unsurprising that Republicans have consistently dominated the South in recent decades.


2

JamesK's answer is great. I have run as a candidate and here are some other reasons a party may not run: Money is limited, especially at local level. Generally money has to be raised at a local level. There may be higher priorities for those resources Person-power is limited. There may be higher priorities for those resources Someone can be seen as a '...


1

In the cases where they have won, it's a dead-end job. It's been mentioned in other answers that voters in big cities often skew to the liberal end of the political spectrum. A Republican candidate pushing conservative policies has little chance of being elected by such a constituency. However, moderate (e.g. some aspects of Rudolph Giuliani) and liberal (...


10

James' answer is correct in regards to the specific cases of Portland and Atlanta, but I think you'll find, in the more general case, that it's not at all unusual for either the Democratic party or the Republican party to not run a candidate in lots of different state and local-level elections in the U.S. There are a few factors that make this especially ...


4

This is relatively easy to visualise using the county-level results from both the 2016 Presidential Election and the 2017 Special Senate Election. That being said, the use of this swing alone to quantify the influence of Roy Moore's sexual assault allegations on the election would be an oversimplification at best. Nevertheless, no county in Alabama returned ...


39

Portland and Atlanta are a little different in this case Portland has a non-partisan primary election: All candidates from all parties enter a single primary election, this includes Republicans (if they wish to stand) Bruce Broussard stood for the Republican party in 2020. The top two candidates the progress to the second round of voting. Current mayor Ted ...


8

No, this has never happened before. The election with the fewest number of states which returned a different overall party winner, in terms of the state-aggregated vote count, was the 1888 Presidential Election, where only New Jersey voted differently - the state cast 98,562 votes for Democrat candidates compared to 105,468 for Republican candidates in the ...


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