95

Yes it does, but there's a specific reason for it. It's important from a historical context to understand that the framers of the Constitution had 3 major concerns in mind when they created the Electoral College, all of them talked about one way or another in the Federalist Papers: To prevent politics from devolving into political parties. It obviously ...


94

I don't know the exact number but, as a proportion of the votes cast, it's essentially 100%. Here's how to calculate it. Find the set of states with the largest population of possible voters but no more than 268 electoral college votes. In all of those states, let candidate A win 100% of the vote, with 100% turnout. In every other state, have just one ...


87

CGP Grey has done the math in November 2011. In the extreme case, assuming a constant turnout across all 50 states (and with the electoral votes distributed as in 2011)*, it could take only 22% of the popular vote to win the electoral college. This is theoretically achievable by winning with a one-vote margin the states with the highest ratio of electoral ...


48

I've recalculated the data for the Electoral College stats as of 2016, taken from Wikipedia. The result is 22%, full explanation below. You only need 270 Electoral Votes to become President. This can be achieved by winning the bottom 40 states (sorted by their population per EV) + DC, with 50.1% of the vote: +----------------+-----+------------+------------...


46

There sure have been a few instances of this occurring. 2000 Election This's the one that many people still remember. Gore won the popular vote by 0.51% while Bush won the electoral college. The tight margin in Florida automatically triggered a recount. Ultimately, a court case stopped the recount and Bush became President. It has also occurred in the ...


45

Ignoring the absurdity of Cthulhu or any other fictional character winning the Presidential General Election, the premise as stated can't happen. Not all States accept write-in ballots. In fact, nine don't accept them at all, thirty-three do, but only if the candidate had already filed paperwork earlier. NBC did a small write up about in 2016 here and ...


41

This is due to so-called faithless electors. Seven electors voted for a candidate other than the one they pledged to vote for. Three voted for Colin Powell, one for John Kasich, one for Ron Paul, one for Bernie Sanders, and one for Faith Spotted Eagle. The FEC's report on the 2016 election contains the map below showing which state these electors were from; ...


38

84,572 votes Assuming you're a third party longshot candidate and there are no other longshot candidates. You only need to win one state to get elected. The easiest state to win in terms of votes is Wyoming. Assuming you're a third party candidate and you win Wyoming with 34% of the vote, you can win with only (248,742 * .34 = 84,572) votes. I got the 248k ...


38

The President Pro Tempore of the Senate can do it. In 1969, Vice President Hubert Humphrey did not participate in the count of the electoral college votes. The President Pro Tempore of the Senate took his place instead. Source: https://www.politico.com/news/2020/12/17/pence-trump-election-loss-447326


37

First, the mandate to Donald Trump, granted in November, 2016 ends at Noon January 20, 2021. No need for him to do anything. The Twentieth Amendment to the Constitution deals with the situation where no person has yet qualified to be elected President for the term starting at 12:00:01 January 20, 2021: Section 3. If, at the time fixed for the beginning of ...


37

Stealing those papers (from Congress' session) would not change the legality of their recording with the Archivist according to the Electoral Count Act (3 U.S. Code § 6)... which by the way says that states must send six duplicate-originals of the same certificate under the seal of the State I doubt all 6 copies were stored in the same location in Congress....


32

More planning time and coordination is always better than less. Since the results are not in dispute, there's nothing that would bar or block the current president from getting together and planning a transition with the probable next president before it becomes officially "official." There's nothing legally binding about their conversations. If a random ...


32

Is the electoral college intended to give smaller states more influence? It wouldn't seem unusual to me if it was designed so that each state has a certain amount of influence regardless of population so that extremely large states can't exert their will over all of the other states. The expressed intention was to do the latter. But the method they chose ...


32

One of the reasons why all votes are counted is that the votes still have to be recorded in the Journals of both Houses of Congress. The Vice President "opens the envelopes" for the votes to be then counted. From 3 U.S. Code § 15: all the certificates and papers purporting to be certificates of the electoral votes, which certificates and papers ...


30

Campaigns have their own internal polling and it can show different results than public polling. In 2016 the Trump campaign polling was far more accurate than many publicly available polls. Pulling out of Florida would indicate that either Trump believes it's a lock for him, or his efforts aren't working so focusing on a different state will be more ...


29

No. Even if the change resulted in there being an odd number of total electoral votes, if a third candidate gets an odd number of electors, then a tie remains possible.


28

The electors are supposed to follow the popular vote within their state. In other words, whichever party "won" the state gets all of the electoral college votes. They don't follow the national popular vote. This means that a candidate can win by a slight margin in states which have a disproportionately high number of electoral college votes compared to ...


27

Well, the Constitution says (Article II, Section 1) The President of the Senate shall, in the Presence of the Senate and House of Representatives, open all the Certificates, and the Votes shall then be counted. while Article I, Section 3 defines the President of the Senate as the Vice President The Vice President of the United States shall be President of ...


27

As you've mentioned, the 12th amendment to the Constitution, enshrined in statute in 3 U.S.C. §15 grants the role of presiding over the counting of the electoral votes in Congress to the President of the Senate, not explicitly the Vice President. As a result, the same provisions apply as would in any other circumstances when the VP is absent or unable to ...


26

I calculated the vote allocation using the Webster/Sainte-Laguë method (based on results as of November 9, 2016) applied to each individual state: Clinton 263 Trump 262 Johnson 10 Stein 2 McMullin 1 In the spirit of the Electoral College giving less populous states a boost in the vote, I altered the formula to award 2 votes per state to the winner of ...


24

I looked at the Wikipedia entry on the term, where they state this in the opening sentences: President-elect of the United States is the title used for an incoming president of the United States during the period between the general election on Election Day in November and noon Eastern Standard Time on Inauguration Day, January 20, during which the ...


24

California needs around 200 million people to control the presidency. The Math There are 538 Electoral College votes and a candidate needs to get 270 votes to win. California gets 2 Electoral College votes from their Senate seats so they need 268 votes from their House of Representatives seats. There are 435 total seats in the House so California needs ...


24

Native Americans (like everyone else) register to vote in the state they are physically based in -- if they can provide an address, which can be difficult. Voter registration rules differ between states. Many Native Americans, especially those who live on reservations, do not have traditional street addresses. This has resulted in voter registration ...


24

The counting of electoral votes in Congress is a ceremonial institution, like so many other things in political and social life. There's no practical reason why Presidents, Congresspeople, and other elected officials have to swear oaths to the constitution; there's no practical reason why clergy don't just say to a bride and groom "Yeah, yeah, you're ...


23

Yes. According to the 12th Amendment of the US Constitution The Electors shall meet in their respective states and vote by ballot for President and Vice-President, one of whom, at least, shall not be an inhabitant of the same state with themselves; they shall name in their ballots the person voted for as President, and in distinct ballots the person voted ...


22

The exact text of Article II, Section 4 is: The President, Vice President, and all civil Officers of the United States shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other High Crimes and Misdemeanors While many actions can possibly be called misdemeanors, I cannot imagine that it is possible to impeach a person ...


22

Okay, I have made some excel computations. Giving each candidates a number of delegates proportional to its share of the vote in the state, without rounding (I know, if we're talking of living human delegates, it will be very cruel and unusual to sends 2.34 delegates to Washington, but abstractly why not?), I get 256 delegates for Clinton, 252 for Trump, the ...


22

You're also missing something deeper in the Texas suit. They request various temporary measures, but then say: As permanent relief, Texas asks this Court to remand the allocation of electors to the legislatures of Defendant States pursuant to the statutory and constitutional backstop for this scenario: “Whenever any State has held an election for the ...


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