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30

First, the mandate to Donald Trump, granted in November, 2016 ends at Noon January 20, 2021. No need for him to do anything. The Twentieth Amendment to the Constitution deals with the situation where no person has yet qualified to be elected President for the term starting at 12:00:01 January 20, 2021: Section 3. If, at the time fixed for the beginning of ...


2

TL;DR: No state that has allowed the people to vote for President and Vice President has ignored the popular vote in that state. There is a slight problem with electors who ignore the outcome of the popular vote in that state. The modern practice1, which has been adopted by all 50 states and the District of Columbia, is to delegate the selection of electors ...


24

Native Americans (like everyone else) register to vote in the state they are physically based in -- if they can provide an address, which can be difficult. Voter registration rules differ between states. Many Native Americans, especially those who live on reservations, do not have traditional street addresses. This has resulted in voter registration ...


3

SCOTUS actually commented on this recently in Chiafalo v. Washington (Pg 17, footnote 8) The Electors contend that elector discretion is needed to deal with the possibility that a future presidential candidate will die between Election Day and the Electoral College vote. We do not dismiss how much turmoil such an event could cause. In recognition of that ...


4

In the event of a Presidential candidate's death after the printing of ballots, would the Electors of certain states be able to vote at all? Yes, that votes must be made is mandatory (for both president and vice-president); however, given enough time, each affected state legislature could meet to override such a vote. Whether any such vote, or override of ...


5

They would have to vote as instructed by that state's supreme court, or the SCOTUS if it was appealled there and the SCOTUS decided it had jurisdiction. The likely set of events would be, for example "Biden wins AZ" Biden dies. The DNC announces that Harris is the new candidate. AZ electors vote for Harris. Now if the Republican party sues, then ...


11

The state would break the tie based on the rules it has setup for a tie vote and the winner of the tie breaker would get the votes. While the information I provided pertains to a legislative vote the general principle remains the same in that a winner has to be declared by breaking any ties. https://www.ncsl.org/research/elections-and-campaigns/resolving-...


17

It depends on the state's law, but as a general rule, the elector is replaced by a new elector supporting the same candidates. For example, Sec. 192.007 of the Texas Election Code allows the remaining electors to appoint a replacement elector by means of a majority vote: (a) The electors meeting to vote for president and vice-president may appoint a ...


3

The word you're looking for is Faithless Electors. As far as I know, what you describe has never happened. To be clear, I mean that faithless electors changing the outcome of an election, not faithless electors in general. According to Wikipedia, there has been only 165 faithless electors total in the history of the United States: Over 58 elections, 165 ...


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