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2

This term can, IMHO, best be understood as an antonym of faithful, which is a common English word. Definition of faithful (Entry 1 of 2) 1: steadfast in affection or allegiance : LOYAL a faithful friend 2: firm in adherence to promises or in observance of duty : CONSCIENTIOUS a faithful employee The 2nd meaning (there are others) is the one of interest ...


4

The selections of electors vary from state to state, and from party to party. However, the two major parties in most states have adopted a fairly similar approach: State delegates associated the winner of a party's national convention appoint a slate of electors who pledge to vote for that party's candidate in the general election. The slate of electors ...


1

It is up to the parties in each state how they nominate their Elector candidates. Sometimes it can be done at the state party's convention, sometimes it's done by the state party's central committee. Electors going rogue ("faithless electors" being the term for such an elector) are very rare, and a matter for state law. There were ten faithless ...


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In hindsight, the answer is yes, it's constitutional to restrict electors' votes at least by means of state-law punishments, which may include their replacement, according to SCOTUS Chiafalo v. Washington and Baca (2020): Chiafalo v. Washington, 591 U.S. ___ (2020), was a United States Supreme Court case on the issue of "faithless electors" in the ...


4

The last sub-q is easy. SCOTUS simply said: The State of Texas’s motion for leave to file a bill of complaint is denied for lack of standing under Article III of the Constitution. Texas has not demonstrated a judicially cognizable interest in the manner in which another State conducts its elections. All other pending motions are dismissed as moot. Statement ...


4

When you sue someone, you must be able to show three things. Wrongdoing An injury to you caused by that wrongdoing A remedy that could fix that injury Texas's suit failed at point #2. The Supreme Court did not agree with Texas's logic about how they were injured. Texas had argued that the four defendant states violated their own and the US constitutions ...


7

In this case, the manner in which the electors were appointed did not change. For most states, the legislature has directed that their electors will be based on whichever candidate wins a plurality of votes in a statewide election. In Nebraska and Maine, the legislatures have directed that 2 electors are appointed this way, and the rest are appointed based ...


0

The Constitution is not ordinarily interpreted so casuistically where fundamental rights like voting are concerned. For instance, the First Amendment clearly states, Congress shall make no law...abridging the freedom of speech, yet in practice, courts have held that many governmental regulations that blatantly abridge freedom of speech, from obscenity, to ...


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This question overlooks the fact that when the constitution speaks of a legislature it's usually talking about the government as a whole (a holdover from the state of affairs in the UK). Congress has the power to collect taxes according to the constitution, but what that really means is that congress has the power to make laws that provide for the executive ...


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