52

Holding an EP election is an unavoidable physical fact that's hard for members of the public to not notice. For example, every registered voter will be sent a polling card. This makes it absolutely unambiguous and un-spinnable to the public that Brexit isn't happening yet. The government strategy is based on the assumption that the public support Brexit ...


21

Yes. To expand on armatita's comment, from the same source: The European Parliament will be important in determining the final withdrawal agreement. Whilst it has no formal role within the Brexit negotiation process, other than the right to receive regular information on its progress, the Council needs to obtain the European Parliament’s consent (Article 50 ...


13

It's not unheard of to hold local council elections, Scottish parliament elections and Welsh assembly elections at the same time, e.g. 2016 - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2016_United_Kingdom_local_elections European elections sometimes get bundled in with those, like in 2014 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2014_United_Kingdom_local_elections Lastly, in 2015 ...


10

Many UK politicians want Brexit. They are against any move that would make Brexit less likely or postpone it. Many UK and EU politicians believe that Brexit can only be postponed beyond the election date and/or the first session of the parliament if the UK votes. So voting would "open the door" to a much longer extension. Not voting would impose a "hard" ...


10

Great Britain uses a system called d'Hondt's method. This allocates seats to parties one at a time, as follows: For each list (party or independent candidate), a priority is calculated: P = V/(S+1), where P is the priority to be calculated, V is the number of votes cast for this list, and S is the number of seats won by this list so far. The list that has ...


10

If I've correctly understood this auto-translated Danish article, Radikale Venstre (Social Liberals) were in an election alliance with Alternativet (The Alternative), so the votes of the latter were added to the former, granting it an extra seat.


9

According to this source (German newspaper), the German part of the EVP (CDU/CSU) voted for anonymous votes. Which isn't surprising, as this party tends to favor companies who coincidentally gifted large amounts of money to them. They have absolutely no interest in people knowing who's paying them how much and who visits them how often. Neither in Germany ...


8

The rights of a UK citizen living in Germany to take part in the European Parliament elections to vote for German MEPs derives from your rights as an EU citizen. Therefore, speculatively, if Brexit day is postponed beyond Election day, then it is the right of a UK citizen to participate in those elections.


8

It's a threat for the Conservative and Labour parties, as they both also field candidates in the EU elections. It's likely that they will be severely beaten by pro-leave (UKIP) or pro-remain (Lib Dem) MEPs. Which will be humiliating for them; and embolden those other parties when it comes to national elections. It's also threatening to many MEPs from ...


8

In theory it's possible because it needs approval by the European Council. In the Treaty on the European Union in Article 16(9) you'll find: Article 16 (...) The Presidency of Council configurations, other than that of Foreign Affairs, shall be held by Member State representatives in the Council on the basis of equal rotation, in ...


8

To summarize what I wrote in several comments... The least controversial conclusion about this election was that both Labour and the Conservatives got punished at the polls. Labor lost half their (MEP) seats, i.e. went from 20 to 10. The Conservatives lost even more, 15 seats, being left with just 4; their worst ever EU-election results. So clearly these ...


8

There are several questions here... By winning this can they [Brexit Party] have a significant impact on Brexit? No, in that they're not in power; but also yes, because they won the EU election in the UK. In the process, unhappy Tory voters have sent a rather clear message to their MPs that they'd like them to get on with Brexit and move on to other ...


7

Here is the relevant page on the website of the European Parliament. All votes are listed here. If the voting process is not anonymous, individual votes are recorded in the documents. This is the link to all non-anonymous votes from Wednesday. The Copyright Directive had the following number: A8-0245/2018.


7

Explain some of what's at stake... Last I looked at one (> 10 years ago), the EU budget had two main chapters: a bunch of subsidies to farmers in the name of keeping them afloat (should they become useful e.g. in a war where food suppliers from outside the EU can't deliver); and a bunch of subsidies to Europe's poorer regions in the name of trying to turn, ...


7

I suggest the Greek referendum in July 2015 that rejected the EU memorandum about their national debt. The pressure put by the (mostly German) EU negotiators and the threat to block Greek banks induced Alexis Tsipras to accept a very similar, supposedly even harsher, memorandum a few days later.


7

There is no official definiton for "dominate." Using that word, especially in a media context, is a value judgement. One could easily say that the party with the largest single vote count "dominated" the election. That's Brexit. One could easily say that the party with the largest single number of seats "dominated" the election. That's Brexit. One could ...


7

This is not entirely accurate. While MEPs cannot propose laws all by themselves... they can request/vote for the Commision to submit a specific proposal. The Commission has the legislative initiative. However, under the Treaty of Maastricht enhanced by the Lisbon Treaty, the European Parliament has a right of legislative initiative that allows it to ask the ...


7

In general In general, legislatures do not require the right of initiative (or even the right of amendment) to be called a legislature or for their members to be called legislators. A specific example is the Dutch Senate, members of which don't have either right (initiative or amendment), yet it is called a legislature and it is the upper chamber of the ...


7

I think you are misunderstanding the Spitzenkandidat system. The Parliament confirms the President of the Commission. On order to prevent backroom deals, several significant parties vowed to confirm only a candidate who had been the leading candidate of a party grouping. They did not vow that they would confirm only the leading candidate of the largest ...


6

From the April 11 agreement to extend article 50, Paragraph 9: the withdrawal should take place on the first day of the month following the completion of the ratification procedures or on 1 November 2019, whichever is the earliest. Paragraph 10: If the United Kingdom is still a Member State on 23-26 May 2019, and if it has not ratified the ...


6

You have already answered the question. MEPs review, amend and eventually approve or reject all European legislation. The Commission cannot pass any legislation without their approval. See here for other duties


6

As far as UKIP is concerned, their performance in the European elections consistently outperformed their performance in General Elections from about 1999 till 2015. After which, their vote collapsed in both. On the other hand, the Liberal Democrats, the Conservatives and Labour have tended to do a bit worse (with occasional exceptions) in the European ...


6

In may we had European elections to elect the European Parliament. The British (being near Brexit date) didn't vote for these elections Yes we did, running European parliament elections in the UK was made a condition of a brexit extension and they were duly run and MEPs elected. The elections were organized in a rush resulting in many EU citizens in the UK ...


6

Judging by the plenary agenda link that Joe C provided, it seems they're booked next week from Monday to Thursday, and then have nothing planned until the Nov 13th. At the very least there's a factual error in there. It should read the 13th rather than the 14th. Further, the MEPs could arguably sit at some point by the end of the month to get this passed --...


6

Member states are allowed to elect its MEPs in any way they wish, so long as it produces a proportional result. With respect to the choice with regards to constituencies, there are pros and cons to each of these approaches. The primary advantage to having a single nation-wide constituency is that it provides the most proportional result. Many smaller ...


5

Your vote may influence if other parties pass the 3% or 5% threshold. If you feel strong opposition to another small party, or if you have sympathy for a second preference, your vote might influence their outcome. Your vote will be counted towards total voter participation statistics. You express an interest in the European elections even if your party will ...


5

I wished to add a point to other answer. Something that's often lost in UK debates is that Brexit negotiations are negotiations. As in the EU actually has an opinion on most of the options available to the PM & the parliament. And any extension would have to go through the EU to be approved. ALL the EU, this needs an unanimous agreement from the 27. ...


5

The UK has taken steps to leave the EU based on a referendum in which the majority voted to leave. There have also been suggestions that there might be an attempt to not go ahead with Brexit all together. It's mostly a cynical view of politics that can be found, for example in this quote in the FT (from a man in a pub): “We do not have a government any ...


5

Yes there are quite a few such papers analyzing the reasons. The general idea is that EU elections are "second order", i.e. less is at stake than in "first order" elections which decide who is in power (in major offices). Second-order elections are not limited to supranational ones, like the EU elections. Midterms in the US are also an example; ...


5

This is based on a mix of official information and my own calculations: EPP: 184 (+5) S&D: 148 (-5) RE (formerly ALDE): 95 (-11) GRN/EFA: 66 (-8) GUE/NGL: 37 (-1) ECR: 64 (±0) EFDD: 25 (-29) ENF: 61 (+3) NI: 25 (±0) Change by member state: +-------+---+---+---+-----+---+---+----+---+--+ |Country|EPP|S&D|RE |G/EFA|GUE|ECR|EFDD|ENF|NI| +-------+---+-...


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