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To more specifically address the comparison to the example of Google and China, Google, Facebook, Apple, Microsoft, etc. do tons of business in the EU. They could indeed simply pull the plug on their EU operations and ignore any EU rules or court rulings from there on, but that would cost them far, far more in lost business than simply complying with the EU ...


0

The EU is claiming a Canada-style deal won’t work merely as a negotiating position. From their point of view, the further they start from the UK’s position, the closer the UK will be force to move to their ideal (full regulatory alignment, with ECJ jurisdiction). Of course, everyone knows that the UK will not agree to this, but it’s still in the EU’s ...


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Rather than a formal reason, this may just be indicative of pre-negotiation maneuvering and building up their negotiating bargaining chips. It's already clear the EU won't grant a Norway/Switzerland level of access, at least not unless the UK agrees to the same kind of constraints those 2 operate under. Note that Switzerland is even closer than the UK, so ...


2

The sea separating the EU and the UK is not very wide and there are fast internet links (in fact I get a faster ping to the Netherlands than to London from inside the UK!) The UK also has the same timezone or only plus/minus an hour or two which makes doing business a lot easier. By the time Canada is starting work Europe is well into the afternoon. It's ...


27

There's not really a lot to elaborate on, the UK's location is the key reason why the EU is not willing to grant a Canada style deal. Elaborated here, as a low number of tariffs, and high quotas. There's more in this article on BBC. Almost all trade agreements include them to some degree, but the EU is demanding particularly strict rules because the UK is ...


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The challenge would be the very fractured political culture and legal and political system. There is a supreme court, but various national supreme courts reserve some powers (even if exercising them would fracture the EU). There is no unified election system for the parliament.


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The European Union and the Articles of Confederation can not be directly compared, because they have very different focus. The Confederation was mostly about diplomatic and military cooperation. It mandated that the participating states would form a defensive pact ("assist each other, against all force offered to, or attacks made upon them, or any of them") ...


1

The Articles of Confederation also had no equivalent of the later Commerce Clause. Under the Articles of Confederation, Congress lacked the authority to regulate commerce, making it unable to protect or standardize trade between foreign nations and the various states. In 1784, Congress requested that the states grant it limited power over commerce for a ...


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If the justice system turns out not to be as independent as one would have hoped (especially relative to the executive), parliamentary immunity acts as a safeguard for the legislators' independence: a regime of parliamentary inviolability is necessary in countries that do not provide their parliamentarians with adequate means of protection, especially ...


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How does granting immunity to an already imprisoned person fit with judicial independence? Judicial independence is a concept that protects the judiciary from undue influence by the other branches. Parliamentary immunity is a concept that protects the legislative from undue influence by the other branches. Parliamentary immunity doesn't support judicial ...


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The European Customs Union was a separate agreement. Here just the countries agreed to join their forces to improve their bargaining power with the rest of the world. But even though all EU countries signed it, it doesn't have a lot to do with the political union. The political union is far looser than what you have the USA. Actually there are a lot of ...


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CONSOLIDATED VERSION OF THE TREATY ON THE FUNCTIONING OF THE EUROPEAN UNION PART SIX INSTITUTIONAL AND FINANCIAL PROVISIONS TITLE I INSTITUTIONAL PROVISIONS CHAPTER 2 LEGAL ACTS OF THE UNION, ADOPTION PROCEDURES AND OTHER PROVISIONS SECTION 1 THE LEGAL ACTS OF THE UNION Article 288 (ex Article 249 TEC) To exercise ...


5

This is a somewhat broad question, but regarding one aspect, there has been some evidence of declaratory shifts towards shelving more immediate EU-exit plans in the platforms of Eurosceptic parties, as noted in a June 2019 Irish Times article: Five years ago, a core theme of every right-wing populist manifesto was withdrawal from the European Union. ...


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