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85

Why is the FBI making such a big deal out Hillary Clinton's private email server? Because she: Violated laws and rules by using personal email server Performed actions that risked classified information being exposed Violated laws and rules by deleting emails (importantly, by violating Freedom of Information Act, basically eliminating ability for citizens ...


52

You are correct that "collusion" is being used very loosely. There is no specific federal criminal statute that outlaws "collusion", for example (except for an antitrust law not relevant here). This NYTimes editorial argues that the term is a problem: The problem is that the focus on the term “collusion” has had the effect of implying precision where ...


42

There's a lot of panicked buying going on in general It's become a joke how much people are hoarding toilet paper (in the US, in particular, it wasn't hard to find before this). But hoarding things is part of a broader issue (emphasis mine) Australia has also suffered from panic buying of toilet paper despite plentiful domestic supply. A risk expert in ...


31

Setting aside the question of whether Clinton is legally culpable, the FBI has confirmed that the servers constituted a data spill of classified information, the extent of which is presumably currently classified. One of the FBI's duties is investigation and mitigation of domestic data breaches and spills, which can take a significant amount of time and ...


26

There are two distinct problems that exist here: the use of a private email server to execute the business of the Department of State and the introduction of classified material into an unclassified system. Each must be addressed in apart from the other. Use of a Personal Server While not inherently illegal, there is a significant appearance of impropriety ...


24

The only possible way to answer this is to quote more from the official text of Comey's press release. I've added my own emphasis, however. Although there is evidence of potential violations of the statutes regarding the handling of classified information, our judgment is that no reasonable prosecutor would bring such a case. Prosecutors ...


16

I'm not even sure if the FBI was officially investigating the issue or not. Yes, the FBI was officially (and likely is) investigating the issue. James Comey confirmed that during a hearing before the House Intelligence Committee. The investigation is still on at the time he was dismissed from the FBI. Mr. Comey said the F.B.I. was “investigating the ...


15

FBI agents are particularly restricted in what they may do or not do. This is partially specified by law, and partially a professional norm. Both law and custom allow FBI agents (as well as all other governmental staff) to have opinions. However, they must be careful about how they express those opinions. Federal Employees Have Restrictions The United ...


14

The panic buying of toilet paper and other items have also caused many people to worry about home/personal safety as well. Either for protecting their own supplies or worry about a general breakdown in society. So gun and ammo sales also jumped. Washington Post story link, may require subscription.


13

The Ryan Lucas NPR article cited already answered this: But that doesn't mean that attorney-client privilege is a magical blanket that covers any and all scrutiny. It doesn't. There are, in fact, a number of exceptions. Perhaps the most frequently cited is known as the "crime-fraud exception." Boiled down to the basics, this says that ...


12

You said: To me, it seems like she was just a bit careless and she has no bad intentions, and the FBI knows that. She was rather a lot careless. Here's what Comey said when he recommended not to prosecute: there is evidence that they were extremely careless in their handling of very sensitive, highly classified information. Note the word "...


10

First off, consider the charges against Manafort. The actual charges, without interpretation. Manafort and Gates have not been indicted for 'collusion'. They have been indicted for tax evasion, and for not registering themselves as foreign agents with the US state department - which is required. The period of time in which these offenses occurred was 2005-...


10

Googling this question produced good answers, but I'll sum them up here anways. First and foremost, the use of many agents is not abnormal. From former agent James Gagliono "In the FBI, we tend to defuse situations by removing the fight-or-flight inclination, via our overwhelming presence. To arrest one, we bring 10. For 10, we'll bring 100," (source) ...


9

Why is the FBI making such a big deal out Hillary Clinton's personal email server? They aren't presently. Or at least, they don't appear to be anymore, even with recent events. They were doing their job by investigating the issue, which was then a "big-deal", but they completed their investigation in July, stating: no charges are appropriate in this ...


8

Collusion: "secret agreement or cooperation especially for an illegal or deceitful purpose" The media has been using Collusion as a catch all for other potential crimes that the Trump team is being accused of. I am not a lawyer, but the legal usage of Collusion would appear to be mostly limited to unfair market practices (e.g.: price fixing between two ...


8

Basically, one has to answer all questions unless – the witness exercise his right against self-incrimination under the Fifth Amendment the information is classified the President asserts his "executive privilege" the question is outside the scope of the hearing the question is asking for investigative information in a criminal case it violates common law, ...


8

Basically, at that time, there was no reason for the FBI to issue a warrant. As the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure states: (d) Obtaining a Warrant. (1) In General. After receiving an affidavit or other information, a magistrate judge—or if authorized by Rule 41(b), a judge of a state court of record—must issue the warrant if there is probable ...


8

FiveThirtyEight had a podcast on the topic and they made one very important non-partisan point: If the affair was a secret (which is just a theory, we don't know without reading the mind of his wife - such marriages often are built on the French model rather than Puritanical one), that secret would have a security implication, in that anyone with such a ...


7

Mostly Content. If the content is classified then the notes are classified. It also could be that the content is not classified but the people who were discussed were in classified positions(CIA, NSA, DOD, etc.) Anytime a person in one of these positions is discussed at all the document is considered classified. This is done to protect our covert assets ...


7

The FBI is a part of the Department of Justice (DoJ). Within the Department, the Department Ethics Office issues guidance on professional ethics. Fortunately for us, they have published their guidance online. There are probably two sections you would want to take a look at: Political Activites covers what political activities a DoJ employee may ...


6

Here's what we know Several prominent Democrats and their assistants (most notably James Podesta) were the subject of hacking, apparently targeted deliberately with spear phishing tactics. These hacks have been tied to Russia (albeit unclearly). Because of this, the FBI opened a counterintelligence investigation. This was not a criminal investigation, was ...


6

We don't know The only person who could really tell us what Robert Mueller is investigating is Mueller himself, and he hasn't made any official pronouncements. Until either Mueller or a spokesperson for Mueller goes on the record, we (the general public) are unlikely to know whether or not there is an investigation. And Mueller is unlikely to go public ...


6

An AP reporter recently asked this exact question in a brief article. As she states, "the answer partly depends on what you see as the real motive behind the director’s firing." Sen. Al Franken is a prominent example of someone who sees a contradiction. As quoted on The Hill: “I am also deeply troubled by the fact that Attorney General Jeff Sessions, ...


6

Why didn't the FBI just get a warrant to retrieve these emails? Because you need probable cause to obtain a warrant. As the article you linked notes, keeping the emails on a private server was - while being a poor and objectionable choice - "in compliance with the laws and regulations at the time", which is also why the FBI didn't bring charges against ...


6

There is no evidence that Trump's alleged sexual affairs have any direct significance or impact to the alleged Collusion. It is also known that similar scandals occur here and there, and this includes even top politicians. However, this may reduce Trump's support received from prominent Republican leaders. Here's the reason: Many Republicans are known for ...


6

Looks like the answer is no. Assuming that "the investigative team" referenced below is a tactical (non-partisan) team and not a high-ranking official or a member of FBI leadership. From https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-politics/wp/2017/05/03/read-the-full-testimony-of-fbi-director-james-comey-in-which-he-discusses-clinton-email-investigation/?...


6

Definition of wiretapping: Wiretapping means connecting a concealed listening or recording device connected to a communications circuit. Two things here: This is obviously a subset of surveillance, which can also include things like following a person and listening to conversations in person. The mention of a device connected to a phone or other ...


6

The FBI does not have much reason to disclose relevant information about it's sources and methods, so we can't easily measure to what extent this particular task force (or any other unit of the federal US intelligence community) surveils social media. But as an academic handbook puts it: Social media intelligence (SOCMINT) is an increasingly important ...


5

It's important to remember that the FBI and Justice Department fall totally underneath the Executive branch. So while it might look bad, or even appear to be a conflict of interest, it is permissible (emphasis mine) The president can also fire the FBI director, even without a stated reason for doing so. “There are no statutory conditions on the president’...


5

The FBI Director is a position within the executive branch of the US Government, thus the President is able to dismiss him like any other executive branch official. There's no exact process and the President just needs to announce his intent and in Comey's case, he wrote a letter to him. Under the Constitution, the FBI Director is an executive branch ...


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