50

"Can it happen"? Sure, the laws of the EU are set by the members of the EU, if the members want to change the rules they can. They can re-admit the UK or not. If there is a law against it, the EU can just change the law. With sufficient political will on both sides it is possible. "Will it happen"? After years of causing problems, how likely is it that the ...


26

No. But the UK can apply for membership according to Article 49 of the Treaty on the European Union. This normally takes years. The article text: Any European State which respects the values referred to in Article 2 and is committed to promoting them may apply to become a member of the Union. The European Parliament and national Parliaments shall be ...


11

The problem with "what if" is that anything goes. If they find unobtanium under the hills of Wales which clearly would yield trillions of euro of profit every year but requires ten trillion euros to invest first which clearly requires an all European effort, you bet everyone would very, very quickly find which half of the toast is buttered. Amend the Lisbon ...


4

The Greek government has not conducted 'haircuts' like those described by Antonopoulous, and certainly not to the extent he suggests, with deposits worth over €50,000 being charged a 20% fee. The measures closest to those which he describes in the linked video were the seizure of local government funds and commercial bank reserves in order to pay salaries ...


4

Entire books have been written on this subject, both about the specific 2008 crash and about financial panics in general, and one SE answer isn't going to cover the full set of categories of miscreants, or convey enough understanding of their misdeeds. We can highlight a few, though. Firstly you have the creation (or, well, enormous expansion) of the ...


1

Greece did force some foreigners and locals to take "hair cuts" on some of their bond investments, but this was done in a more complicated fashion than described by Antonopoulos, namely: to minimize the number of holdout creditors in the Greek debt restructuring [...] Parliament enacted what amounted to a class voting mechanism covering all Greek ...


1

Unless you have a particularly civically-educated society, there would be no benefit. If times are good, and you either raise taxes or don't cut taxes and accumulate a rainy day fund or pay down debt, the average short-attention-span historically-illiterate voter will just see it as soaking the taxpayer for extra funds when because the money is there to be ...


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