84

In most countries where this system is used, there is a level of continuity between brackets. For example, in the United Kingdom, where the tax brackets are defined as follows: 0% up to £12,500 20% from £12,501 to £50,000 40% from £50,001 to £150,000 50% over £150,000 In this scenario, if I were on a £200,000 salary, I would not pay 50% on the whole £200,...


44

You seem to have a common misconception of tax brackets (at least the way they're implemented in the US and in many other countries): The tax rate of each bracket is marginal - that is, it is only applied to the income that is "inside" the limits of that bracket. "Entering" a bracket does not affect your tax rate for the income below the bracket. Thus, the ...


44

You want people to be able to understand their tax returns. Addition and multiplication are hard enough; finding your place on a curve could involve square roots or (gasp) logarithms. Even some college graduates might have trouble applying that in the real world, without the formalism of calculus homeworks.


29

Can he directly attack their pay check as members of Congress? No. It is not within the president's enumerated powers to confiscate, redirect, or withhold their pay check. Can he engage the agencies of the Executive department to damage them in their home state? Yes. Just look at the threats he made against Sen. Lisa Murkowski following her vote. Threats ...


26

First, a bit of background about how Congress gets its health care. Members of Congress and their staff used to receive their health insurance through the Federal Employees Health Benefits program, like many other government employees (this is all laid out in CRS report R43194 if you have some strange burning desire to know even more about lawmakers' health ...


24

Most tax system are continuous (or try to be continuous). Systems like the US system with tax brackets apply different tax rates to income within each bracket, but there is no penalty going from a lower bracket to a higher one. Where things are discontinuous are often additional advantages: As an example, in Germany it used to be that you could deduct a ...


16

There are several points in your question which need to be separated. First, this article you've linked asserts that there is a deliberate campaign from the Russian government which tries to influence the French elections. For this, various subjects are identified: Putin the Russian Government Russian banks a former KGB agent members of the Russian ...


14

Apparently Health and Human Services makes the payments for Congressional health insurance. So it is possible that they may be able to stop making those payments (and this seems to be what he meant). Note that it is not constitutionally possible to change Congressional compensation during a Congress (currently in the 2017-2018 Congress). The twenty-...


13

Has the UK government stated how Heathrow expansion will be financed? See Policy paper, Heathrow north-west runway economic regulation: financing and affordability explanatory briefing, Published 21 June 2018 [Investors in the business that owns the airport] will pay all of it (including cost overruns) The policy paper says The proposed Airports National ...


12

Lawmakers like to be able to set the marginal tax rates for different income groups independently of each other. A politician who is negotiating an increase or decrease in taxes wants to be able to communicate very specifically to his electorate about who is hit by, or benefits from, the changes he's voting for. A single unified curve that defines marginal ...


7

Look at the history of income taxes: until about twenty years ago, virtually everybody calculated their taxes using pencil and paper, possibly with the assistance of a calculator. Prior to the 1960s, even banks and other large corporations that could afford a computer did their taxes that way. Bracketed taxes are far easier to calculate by hand than ...


6

The reason why stepped tax curves are used, rather than continuous, is because of mathematics, and a desire to keep things simple. The amount of tax you will pay on your earnings is equal to the area under the curve of tax rate on the y-axis vs salary on the x-axis. Having a stepped curve with discrete levels is the easiest type of curve to calculate the ...


5

Why does it need a bailout every year? As usual with accounting, because the income is less than expenses. Specifically, expenses related to paying its liabilities. Income is obvious - advent of electronic communications (and competition from UPS and FedEx to top that off) drove down revenues significantly since 2000. As far as expenses (and liabilities):...


5

Randall L. Tobias was the U.S. Ambassador of the U.S. Agency for Intentional Development and the deputy Secretary of State under George W. Bush. He was forced to resign after it came to light he had used an infamous D.C. prostitution service (the same service, incidentally, that would destroy New York Governor Eliot Spitzer's political career). The Russian ...


4

I know it's over a year old, but I came here to also ask this question. As far as I can find in my research, the US actually went in the opposite of the desired direction, and helped make itself more appealing as a tax haven. From the linked article quoting James Henry, a senior advisor to the Tax Justice Network: The U.S. has an onshore haven industry ...


4

Payment processing companies are businesses and have to square the fact that payments from a particular individual (or organisation) are making them money with the potential damage that processing payments on behalf of that personal (or organisation) may do to their brand and hence their overall balance sheet. Alex Jones is a good example of this. His ...


3

Trump used tariffs to get Neo-Liberal policies in place with China, now, US and other nations can now take in 100% of the profits when manufacturing and selling cars in China whereas before they were limited to 50% of the profit. This is a pretty big win for those US companies and the stock owning class. There is no mention of the tariff going away, ...


3

Yes, the airport's private owner, Heathrow Airport Limited, will apply to the government's Planning Inspectorate for an unusual kind of national planning consent called a Development Consent Order. From the airport company's official expansion website: Expansion will be authorised via a Development Consent Order, a special kind of consent for major ...


3

It depends on what legislation affects the private sector. Say the private sector can turn away people with genetic defects and the like, that is specifically those more likely to have larger medical bills throughout life or people who are already chronically ill. Or say they can turn away daredevils who do lots of snowboarding or whatever sport gets you ...


2

OK, based on Daily TARP Update for 2/1/2013 from US Treasury: | ($Billions) | Loaned | Repaid | Balance | Writeoff | Income | CashBack | =====================+========+========+=========+==========+========+==========| | Bank bailouts only | 250.46 | 234.00 | 16.46 | 3.15 | 6.65 | 268.16 | | Total TARP paid | 418.11 | 344.43 | 73.68 | ...


2

Expecting private companies to finance a £26.5 billion infrastructure investment with no cost to taxpayers appears, to put it mildly, optimistic; it supposes the entire cost + financing can be met by existing profit margins or profit growth due to increased capacity. I know very little of the specifics of this plan but this (having private companies finance ...


1

Actually some countries has had step-bracketed tax systems where the 'curve' isn't continuous. It was changed a long time ago especially to avoid the penalties when getting a raise and now it's exactly like the US bracketed system. Now, here in Denmark we also do our tax returns but for the last decade (or more) it has been more or less automated, which ...


1

First of all, there is one important thing you need to keep in mind when talking about freedom of speech issues. Freedom of speech means that the state is not allowed to restrict speech. But this does not extend to private entities. Private entities are not obligated to provide a platform for speech they do not agree with. They are also not obligated to make ...


1

Firstly, Heathrow is a private business. Its major shareholders are listed on that wiki page. According to the FT the plan is to raise that money through secured credit; £14bn is a lot, but given that the owners include Qatar I think they can find it from somewhere. The most recent net income number I can find for Heathrow is £163m. Naively we could say ...


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