6

Pegden, Procaccia, and Yu have proposed a really cool new method for districting from game theory. In a 2 party system, a pretty fair solution can be reached using a method deriving from the simple concept of "I cut, you choose." A 2/5/18 Washington Post article describes the solution as follows: The first party divides the state into eight districts (in ...


5

First-past-the-post systems are polarizing. Because of the advantages of tactical voting, most people concentrate on a popular candidate who is good enough. So parties build themselves around such candidates. Then the parties tend to be left in control of the nominating process that winnows down to two candidates per post. In the USA, this results in a ...


4

There is no need to found a new party. There are plenty of parties that already support a form of PR. You state that "the party that leads government will inevitably be either the Conservative Party or the Labour Party". There is nothing inevitable about this. There are plenty of examples of previously dominant parties collapsing in support. Look at the ...


4

Any other way? No. The normal suggestions are An "independent" commission. A "fair" algorithm. But who chooses the fair algorithm? The politicians in power. How long does it take before someone realizes that they can gain more power with a "fairer" algorithm that happens to give them more seats. They don't even need to be cynical about it. It'...


4

The dissent in the court case referenced by the question addresses this at some length. It takes care to distinguish two questions: Is a districting map fair to members of all parties? Does the map have the purpose and effect of diluting representation based on party affiliation? The dissent agrees with the majority that the first question is not ...


3

Not only is it possible for nation states to use multiple voting systems in different legislative systems, but some are already doing it. As an example from the "A"s, Australia uses the Single Tranferable Vote (a proportional system, though not a single constituency list one) for its Senate, and instant-runoff (a single winner preferential system) for the ...


2

To perform the analysis below, I've used the General Election 2019 data available from the House of Commons Library. Spoiler Effect I've defined a flippable seat as a seat which the Conservative party won, but where the total number of votes won by the Labour, Liberal Democrat, Green & Plaid Cymru candidates was larger. I've included Green & Plaid ...


2

Yes, it is. More often, one would say the single member district plurality system. Another common term for it is the "first past the post" system (mostly in British English). This sentence from the link uses versions of all three phrases: In the U.S., all states (except for Maine and Nebraska) and the District of Columbia use a winner-take-all form of ...


2

Register a political party that has the following two pledges: (a) Hold a referendum on voting reform, giving the electorate a choice of the following four alternative voting systems: Additional Member System; Closed Party List; Open Party List; Single Transferable Vote. (b) Trigger a snap general election using the new voting system. Stand candidates ...


1

Use a proportional voting system. As every vote counts the same, the shape of voting districts has no effect on the election results. This removes the incentive for Gerrymandering.


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