109

I wouldn't necessarily say that the mainstream media is ignoring Zelensky's statement. (NY Times, Washington Post analysis, Fox News). However, he made the statement at the end of September, and it's now almost the end of October, so it's "old news". Unless something new happens to re-reference it, it's unlikely to still be covered by anyone. That said, ...


70

The only "element" missing is a sufficient number of Senators who would vote on the basis of the evidence rather than politics.


64

Given how Zelensky was willing to agree with everything that Trump was saying in that conversation, it shouldn't be too surprising that Zelenskiy agreeing with Trump in public too doesn't seem terribly genuine. Zelensky was fawning to Trump to such an extent that EU decided to comment: According to the White House’s rough transcript of the call, Trump ...


47

To me, it's like accusing someone of pressuring someone else and the person supposedly being pressured says they are not being pressured You seem to be missing the whole point of pressuring someone: to make them do what you want them to do. If someone is being held hostage, do you believe them if they say they're not being held hostage? Of course not. The ...


22

Yes the Senate bill can be framed as an attempt by the U.S. to influence China. Whether that is a bad thing or not depends on your own beliefs. The U.S. commonly uses trade restrictions and sanctions to attempt to bring about change in other nations that it believes are acting against the interests of the U.S.. Iran continually faces sanctions for their ...


19

One word: MRDA, short for: Mandy Rice-Davies Applies. MRDA, an abbreviation for Mandy Rice-Davies Applies, is Internet slang meaning "well he would say that, wouldn't he?" It is used to indicate scepticism of a claim due to the obvious bias of the person making the claim. Wikipedia / MRDA (slang) While giving evidence at Ward's trial, Rice-Davies made ...


17

First point: Trump has already been impeached, legally and correctly. That is part of his legacy now, and nothing will erase that unless the US system of governance itself is uprooted and cast aside. The Senate's job was to hold a trial to see if the impeachment that the House delivered merits more drastic action, like public censure or the removal of the ...


16

NBC has the order of events/statements a bit more clearly outlined In a recent interview, Clinton didn't mention Democratic presidential candidate Rep. Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii by name, but said she believes one candidate is "the favorite of the Russians." Asked if the former secretary of state was referring to Gabbard, Clinton spokesman Nick Merrill said, ...


14

Overwhelming bipartisan support for impeachment was the "missing element." This was equally true back in the Clinton impeachment, as has been during the Trump impeachment. To successfully impeach a president it takes a super-majority. Compare with the scandal that Nixon/Watergate scandal. While Republicans initially defended Nixon as a block, but ...


14

The allegation is that Trump withheld millions in aid until his requests would be fulfilled. As long as he remains president, he can still withhold that aid money at any time. Thus, if Zelensky thinks the aid is important, he still has to try and stay on Trump's good side in order to get it. That means saying whatever Trump wants with respect to this ...


13

It depends how you define "foreign interference" (but also no) If you are using this term to mean any non-citizen having any impact on the result of an election, then yes, this is clearly foreign interference. If, however, you are using something more akin to Wikipedia's definition of Foreign electoral intervention as "attempts by governments, covertly or ...


11

After 2001 when Taliban Government fell then there was a question of who (and more importantly how) will rule the Afghanistan? So, there was a conference in Bonn,Germany. Hamid Karzai was appointed the chairman of interim administration. Later he won the election of 2004. However, Hamid Karzai had some contention with the USA. He always wanted USA to take ...


10

The most common talking points among Republican senators are that either the evidence isn't strong enough, or that the president was pursuing Ukrainian corruption generally and not his own reelection interests. A few have suggested, though, that the actions the president is accused of aren't illegal or aren't impeachable. Direct evidence that the ...


10

From Politico's "Clinton says Russia is backing Gabbard": “I’m not making any predictions, but I think they’ve got their eye on somebody who’s currently in the Democratic primary and they’re grooming her to be the third-party candidate,” Clinton said in an interview for Plouffe’s Campaign HQ podcast. “She’s the favorite of the Russians. They have ...


8

Yes, in the same way that any action or inaction of a foreign government can be treated as "foreign interference". No, it's ordinary diplomacy.


5

From what I read, the interview occurred on the sidelines of a UN General Assembly meeting; Trump and Zelensky were next to each other when the question was asked.* Factually, there are two possibilities: There was pressure applied in some way, shape and form from the US government or anyone associated with it to the Ukranian government or anyone ...


5

OpenSecrets has a list of some Qatari PR contributions during their recent conflict with the Saudi-led part of the Arab world. These are by no means unique; the same source has a similar list of Turkish efforts, for example. Likewise they have a list for Saudi Arabia. OpenSecrets' articles seem to be based mostly on FARA disclosures though. They don't seem ...


4

You could in theory report it to the DOJ which could in theory ask SE's parent company to register itself as a foreign agent under FARA (and then display prominent notices on its site[s]), if the DOJ were to agree with your claim that (politics)SE is significantly influenced by foreign powers. Good luck with that. (I for one think the DOJ would force ...


3

In The Spectator Stephen Daisley argues that Iran supported Scotish independence because it would undermine the UK as a global power. Tehran grasps that independence would distract the UK internally and undermine its global standing. London would have to endure long negotiations with Edinburgh, establish new borders and customs arrangements, and build a ...


3

Is there a widely accepted definition of that term in US national security parlance, as documented in some authoritative document, e.g. in some CIA/NSA/FBI manual? Apparently, the Defense Intelligence Agency decided to produce such a document. GLOSSARY (UNCLASSIFIED) TERMS & DEFINITIONS OF INTEREST FOR DoD COUNTERINTELLIGENCE PROFESSIONALS Asset. [In ...


3

The Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project (OCCRP) published a profile of them in July: On the subject of their background and connections, they don't say much on Parnas, which makes sense since he emigrated to the US at the age of 4: A resident of upscale Boca Raton, Parnas once ran an electronics business that was successfully sued for its ...


2

According to a Wikipedia article in Russian (they cite specific legislation), there are mostly two criteria: Participate in political activity Receive funding (or any property) from foreign governments, companies, persons, or even persons without any citizenship There does not appear to be any threshold, though you may want to check the actual law (which ...


2

Things may have changed since senators-wise, but this bit should insightful: McConnell told Republican senators their best bet was to calibrate their own message about the impeachment inquiry to fit their political situation, according to two people familiar with the private meeting who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss the closed-door session. ...


1

It is a mistake to focus on who the foreigner want to win any particular election. The point of the interference is not to elect the more favorable candidate. From the point of view of foreign hostile governments there is very little difference between one candidate or the other, they want to weaken the entire United States. The point is to sow confusion and ...


1

An anecdotal partial response: In online circles critical of the US regime, this seems to be met with derision. Seeing how no evidence has been presented for alleged interference; and little-to-no evidence has been presented for the claims of Russian government involved in 2016 - especially in light of the frenzy around this issue for over 3 years - the ...


1

Pressure (or not) is Irrelevant While a full-on quid pro quo would obviously be illegal, it's still illegal to ask for election help from a foreign government. There's no need (legally) to prove pressure or agreement to prove a crime took place. Those kinds of allegations are more subjective and harder to nail-down, given the vague nature of implied threats,...


1

I have not been able to find the specific law, but the BBC published an article earlier today in which the report on an updated version of the foreign agents law. Regarding the earlier version they write: The "foreign agent" label already applies to certain media organisations and NGOs which engage in politics and receive funding from abroad. However, ...


1

(partial answer) Does Al Arabiya have a presence in the US? Yes, they appear to have a Washington bureau chief and they interviewed (short clip by the AP) the then just elected President Barrack Obama. From Al Arabiya's own website: "We contacted many of our friends inside and outside the American administration," Melham told AlArabiya.net. "And I ...


1

It is hard to Google older data because everything is swamped by the current scandal, however, what I find about Igor Fruman is that he is owner of a 5star hotel in Odessa and of "Otrada Luxury Group" which is "exclusive distributor of Prologue jewelry", owned by Pedro de Amanda and Corrine de Amanda, whose profiles have additional info. Source: https://...


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