21

Why stop there: why don't all the countries of the world form an alliance and hey presto, no more conflicts ever. Obviously the world doesn't work like that. The reason different countries exist in the first place is because people in different areas have different, and competing, interests. Nations are groups of people with shared interests. (At least in ...


18

This seems to be coming from Haldeman: While Nixon sought support from the silent majority, diplomats were at work on both North and South Viet- namese. Kissinger continued his talks with Le Duc Tho and indicated that his boss might be mentally unhinged. Nixon himself carefully cultivated the fears that he might go to irrational lengths to get his way. ...


10

It is precisely because of the Prisoner's Dilemma logic that random ballot is strategy free. A voting system being strategy free means that what (you think that) other people's votes have no impact on how you would vote. Since the impact of your vote always is "a tiny chance for your selected candidate to win", you don't need to consider other people at all....


8

The voter would only want to vote when they are the marginal voter. If they don't know when they are the marginal voter, their optimum strategy is to vote in their first election, and then vote based on the turnout in the last election. If either candidate wins by a comfortable margin, there is no reason to vote (their vote wouldn't have mattered). Otherwise ...


6

Nixon (oh wait, he actually was) Richard Nixon wasn't impeached; he resigned. Bill Clinton actually was impeached, although not removed from office. But this shows part of the issue. Nixon resigned and replaced with Gerald Ford, who then had less moral authority in dealing with Congress. That was somewhat relevant at the time because the Democrats ...


6

There's a bit more interesting theorizing in Hersh's book The Price of Power how the theory may have come to the attention of Nixon. It is highly likely that Kissinger was responsible for Nixon's adoption of the phrase the "the madman theory". In 1959, Ellsberg had present two lectures to Kissinger's Harvard seminar on the conscious political use of ...


4

Random Ballot could be considered a prisoner's dilemma, depending on what your priorities are. The Prisoner's Dilemma is a scenario where two people are making a binary choice where the stable equilibrium of the system (the strategic choice of all parties trying to maximize their personal gain) is less profitable for all players than if everyone had made ...


4

Your biggest mistake is assuming people are motivated by rational reason and not emotions. Modern cognitive psychology disputes that assumption, greatly. Especially when it comes to core tribal identity issues, which include (or are led by) politics. As you said in the comments, it's not always a serious push. Often enough it is about what's know as "...


3

Expanding on what @Tom said: Besides of zero-sum games and win-win situations that may lead to some Pareto equilibrium, Nash equilibrium or other types of equilibrium. We can also find lose-lose situations, and the nature of relations may vary depending on the scope as in tragedy of the commons, by introducing in the system some externalities, which may ...


2

Parties and, more importantly, their supporters and/or pundits, will pretty much say anything. The Republicans were in control of the House for much of Obama's presidency. There was nothing stopping them from initiating impeachment proceedings (lack of actual substance does not stop one from going through the process). They did not. The same is true for ...


2

One strategy is never bluffing. There's two ways to do this: Deviously: never bluff, but attempt to create the illusion of clumsily attempting to bluff. In this way the enemy believes their adversary is bluffing about their actual strength, and therefore underestimates the non-bluffer. Plainly: the gains to be had are in trade and the confidence of ...


2

I can't think of names but I have strategies and examples (and hopefully some real life and fictional examples, though I'm trying to cut through some examples that would be touchy). One of the causes of World War 1 was the "Battleship arms race" where the various nations of the world were trying to build fleets of battleships to counter their rival ...


1

Given the details, I'm pretty sure you're referring to Bruce Bueno de Mesquita. He predicted that Ali Khamenei would succeed Ruhollah Khomeini as Supreme Leader of Iran in 1984, five years before the latter's death, and further predicted that Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani would take over from Khamenei. This has not happened as of yet. One of his other various ...


1

Rather than provide a long list of simulation models that may meet your requirements to various degrees, here's a source where you can search through lots of models: The Journal of Artificial Society and Social Simulation (JASSS). JASSS is a peer-reviewed academic article dedicated to simulations of social phenomena. And better yet - it's accessible online ...


1

Cambridge Analytica has modeled individual peoples' personality and uses AI to influence their voting behavior based on individual personalities. Any company can aggregate and purchase big data, but Cambridge Analytica has developed a model to translate that data into a personality profile used to predict, then ultimately change your behavior. That model ...


1

Indigochild's answer supposes the uninformed voter is interested in "winning", i.e. his chosen candidate or proposal wins, and does things that benefit the voter. This answer is an attempt to sketch some options of uninformed voters who don't so much care about personal benefits, (let's suppose they'll sturdily endure most any ensuing political weather), ...


1

Game theory relates to the study of decision making processes. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Game_theory Specifically, it relates to the mathematical modelling of decision "branches" as if they were a "game," or possibly a computer program. This is used in the study of economics and political science. There are two basic types of "games" representing two ...


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