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22

Your assumption of a US-EU treaty to enforce fines seems like it is one of two intended enforcement methods, the other being the required establishment of representatives to ensure non-EU entities have at least some physical presence in the EU. The GDPR requires non-EU entities handling EU data to appoint a representative in the EU, and this representative ...


13

To complement Giter's excellent answer, procedures to collect internationally already exist through the typical judicial channels. In a nutshell, the judge issuing the fine in the EU would forward the case to a judge in the company's country, and the latter would then consider whether to enforce the collection or not. Fined companies could fight the ...


12

In a nutshell because "the EU" simply doesn't want more "hard" anonymity. In particular, they surely don't seem to want more financial anonymity, which is a large part of what you propose. Witness the withdrawal of the 500 euros bill in order to fight crime etc. Also the EU certainly doesn't like pseudononymous bank accounts, given how easy it is to use them ...


12

In the best scenario, a government won't regulate an industry until there is a clear and distinct problem that requires regulation. First, a demonstrable public ill related to the activities of the industry must come into evidence. Second, the industry itself must show an inability or unwillingness to address that public ill. Then (and only then) will ...


11

The problem is not that we're forced to provide our private data. We want to provide it, but expect the sites to handle it responsibly. Let's take the simple example of ordering a pizza online. You can provide a false name, but you can't provide a false address (because then you won't get your pizza). The restaurant gets your address, which is private ...


8

The problem with this approach is that you're severely underestimating how hard it is to stay anonymous. Think of your identity as a graph, with your aliases being the nodes and common data between the nodes being the connections: without any reason to destroy data or limit the spread of it, the number of connections between your aliases will always grow, ...


4

GDPR shouldn't affect raising signatures for political purposes much, if at all. Signatures and other personal/identifying data can be collected and processed if it is to fulfill a public task (such as to choose candidates for an election), and if the people giving their signatures consent to their political data being processed. Article 6 of GDPR covers ...


3

I believe that, at least in the UK, the relevant authority could get a court order which names the senior management in the company as being personally responsible. If the company fails to comply then when any of those individuals come to Europe they will be risking arrest for contempt of court. In the past the US has ordered banks and credit card companies ...


2

In addition to the other answers: There is a general trend to suppress "hate speech" and "fake news" in the EU. You cannot control the flow of messages if you do not know who sent them or at least control the access points, so granting full or even partial anonymity would be a death blow to this form of control. Sure, anonymity often is abused for the worse ...


1

I couldn't find any estimates made by the EU but Financial Times estimates that Fortune 500 companies alone will spend $7.8bn on compliance efforts. However, according to some surveys, EU companies will be spending less that US counterparts primarily because entities in the EU already have to comply with 1995 Data Protection Directive when dealing with ...


1

Enforcement of EU fines issued under GDPR would be by the use of international law - essentially the US courts would recognize the legitimacy of the EU fine and enforce it (this may require a secondary action to be brought in the US court. My company provides the Representative service mentioned above, where we act as the EU-facing presence for a non-EU ...


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