199

There are critics of globalization both on the progressive and on the conservative side of the political spectrum. One of the most relevant progressive anti-globalization NGOs is the European Attac. The main concern from the left-wing perspective is not globalization in theory but rather the way it is currently being implemented in practice: with a focus on ...


57

The main practical problem with globalism is implied right there in your question: Trade makes everyone better off in the long run, and it isn't as if we can just pretend that we don't live on a planet anyways, right? "Makes everyone better off in the long run" sounds nice, but it's not accurate. It makes an average member of population - and population ...


30

This $1.90/day is an updated (for inflation basically, more precisely for ICP) of the 1990 World Bank standard of $1/day (actually $31/month). So it's worth recalling the principles/derivation for the original figure of Ravaillon et al. (1991): Different societies have different perceptions of what constitutes "poverty," reflecting (in part) different ...


20

The downside of free movement of goods globally is that it drives competition of production that in turn leads to loss of jobs locally where production costs are high. This is especially true in industries that rely on manual labor where employer salaries contribute a large part of the total costs. The upside is of course cheaper goods. The people who ...


16

Others have addressed the economic and social aspects fairly well, so I won't repeat them except to throw in a Trump quote which sums it up: "A nation without borders is not a nation." Anyone who agrees with this sentiment, and likes their country and wants to preserve it, would therefore want "borders" in a meaningful sense. And even your question ...


14

Update for 2020 With the COVID-19 epidemic currently killing lots of people in part due to market disruption (e.g. manufacturing of medical supplies) and causing lots of supply chain disruption in non-essential industries (insert toilet paper line joke) this answer takes on a tragic rather than speculative tone. Hopefully we do better going forward. ...


13

A significant point here is that the $1.90 a day standard is often for a subsistence farmer (not an urban dweller). And for a subsistence farmer, income is not really the best measure. Because most of a subsistence farmer's production and consumption is local to that household. The subsistence farmer grows and consumes the same food. This won't show up ...


13

The answer is in the quoted passages you've posted. Imperialism is a policy put forth by a nation, whereas globalization is a global phenomenon. Imperialism is unilateral and globalization is multilateral, as you alluded to. Specifically, globalization is more of a result of a variety of multilateral organizations, treaties, and policies by many governments ...


12

Economically, Globalization means capital mobility. This implies that capital can move production to a place with cheaper labor, which facilitates international division of labor, but also reduces the labor share of income. Thus many places have winners (e.g., urban population in China who are now busy building stuff) and losers (e.g., European and US ...


11

First of all globalization makes people on average better off, but there are plenty of losers. For example unskilled workers in US have lower salaries with globalization because huge supply of unskilled workers around the world. Other than that there are 2 related problems: loss of sovereignty: For example EU was sold to people as a free trade union, but ...


10

Besides the economic issues that the other answers describe well are the cultural issues. Like with any modernization, elements from the past are diminished, lost, forgotten, and people will be lament this. When cultures mix there is a fear from both sides of each group losing a part of their identity, or that some piece of their culture will not be passed ...


9

The 1.90 $PPP poverty line is mean to measure extreme absolute poverty as the poverty line in the poorest counties. This is then expressed in a purchasing-power-parity currency, and this number is revised every few years. According to the World Bank's FAQ on the global poverty line: How do you come up with a global poverty line?  We start with ...


9

That's a good and complex question. In addition to great answers already given, it is also worth looking at who feels strongly about globalisation, and who benefits or doesn't benefit from it. The criticism is largely the same on both the left and the right, namely that ordinary people suffer too many of the disadvantages of globalisation and reap too few ...


9

After reading your comment below Gramatik's answer, you seem to be asking if the outcomes of globalization aren't effectively the same as those of imperialism. I think this is a more difficult question because imperialism often increased trade, a hallmark of globalisation. The real question is what kind of trade. The first forms of globalisation are ...


8

Based on that, the main difference seems to be that imperialism is something from the past whereas globalisation is from the present. I would disagree. The main difference in my opinion is that imperialism is globalization imposed by the imperialist. Globalization is the more general term. It includes military and economic imperialism but also things ...


6

The premise of this question is flawed as one user put it; Plaid and the SNP do not consider joining the EU to be ceding sovereignty, they believe that it enhances it. As part of a larger group, with power such a veto, they have more control over their own destiny than they do alone. Even accepting the broad sweep of the Questioners' position then yes, ...


6

Using just the three things in your question Trump has done or progressed towards all of them. NAFTA is in the process of renegotiation, and Trump has withdrawn from the Paris Accord, TTIP/TPP, and Iran nuclear deal. He has also imposed widespread tariffs in order to correct trade imbalances that he views as disadvantageous deals. The border wall is a huge ...


5

Define "Globalization". Presently, and I mean since approximately the Western Thatcher/Reagan era, it means the deindustrialization of Western nations in favor of financial services, while manufacturing is taken up by exporter nations, particularly Asian ones, so that dollar-a-day Asian labour can present the illusion of low CPI, while asset price inflation ...


5

The KOF Globalisation Index and its derivatives, e.g. used in Bertelsmann Stiftung studies, are a per-country measure with several components: three sub-indices: the economy (weighting: 60 percent), social dimensions and politics (weighting: 20 percent each). The Economy sub-index provides indicators for crossborder ties in the areas of trade in goods and ...


5

Depends on how long they last, and how far ahead the citizen thinks. Many first world countries have fully or partly privatized pension systems, where each citizen should save some income during working years to spend during retirement. How much to save depends on what you think you'll need, how old you expect to get, and on the interest rates. Lower or ...


4

There are probably many reasons as cited above as to why people hate globalization. Here in the United States, globalization has hollowed out rural America and even some semi-rural parts of America like where I currently live, but not for much longer. Rural economies can rarely muster economies of scale that enable globally competitive enterprises. Rural ...


3

Imperialism usually refers to the doings of a military empire founded for the benefit of a particular nation or alliance. Globalism usually refers to an enlarging an economic environment or standard for the main benefit of some set of powerful multinational corporations. Wealthy family dynasties are common to both, as are claims that what's good for an ...


3

What are the metrics of globalisation? The DHL Global Connectedness Index measures globalization based on trade, capital, information, and people flows. Global Connectedness refers to the depth and breadth of a country’s integration with the rest of the world, as manifested by its participation in international flows of products and services, capital, ...


2

The question is flawed. Plaid and the SNP do not consider joining the EU to be ceding sovereignty, they believe that it enhances it. As part of a larger group, with power such a veto, they have more control over their own destiny than they do alone.


1

You're missing the fact that trade is bidirectional. You focus on oil buyers which need USD; the reverse is also true. There are oil sellers which have excess USD. The latter typically import lots of basic goods, from food to furniture. And of course, they'd happily pay for those imports in USD. You could even barter, there's strictly speaking no need to ...


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