43

They tend to think it's somebody else's problem (Ireland's and/or the DUP's). Unless you are part of the DUP of course. See how Rees-Mogg has been punting the problem along the lines of: I agree with whatever the DUP agrees (or at least doesn't oppose) on Northern Ireland. And at the same time he says that in the case of no-deal Ireland would not dare to ...


31

The brexiteers don't really want anything regarding the Irish border. It's just a problem preventing them getting the hard brexit that they want, and since they don't have a real solution for it they just want to pretend it's not really a problem. That's all it is, an annoying roadblock for them.


20

I'm a Remainer, but have been accused of being a Hard Brexiter on some stances in this debate, so I'll take a stab. The WTO, the Repubic of Ireland, the UK and the EU have all recently made declarations and supporting statements that they have no intention of putting up border checks on any border between the Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. ...


10

From the Northern Ireland Act 1998 Subject to paragraph 3, the Secretary of State shall exercise the power under paragraph 1 if at any time it appears likely to him that a majority of those voting would express a wish that Northern Ireland should cease to be part of the United Kingdom and form part of a united Ireland. The Secretary of State ...


9

What the hard Brexiters want is for Ireland to leave the EU at the same time as the UK and negotiate a bilateral trade treaty on the UK's terms that keeps the border open. There is of course precisely zero chance of them getting it.


7

The Good Friday Agreement requires "rigorous impartiality" by the UK government, so it can arbitrate between parties in Northern Ireland. A UK government which depends on one of those parties for its existence may be breaking that rule. Whether the UK government is breaking the agreement can only be officially settled by a court of law. In principle it ...


6

This question touches on the political history of Northern Ireland, which is long, complicated and contentious, but the following is my best understanding. The "union" in this case is the one created in the Acts of Union of 1800 between the Kingdom of Great Britain (itself created by a union between England and Scotland) and the Kingdom of Ireland. This act ...


5

A key aspect of the GFA was the removal of all border apparatus on the Island of Ireland. The border was often a target of violence and a physical divider between the two communities. If the UK leaves the EU Customs Union then products which do not meet EU standards will be able to enter the UK and cross the border into Ireland. Similarly people, livestock ...


4

Does a hard border in Ireland necessarily breach the Good Friday Agreement? According to my understanding, a hard border would not literally breach the Good Friday Agreement (GFA), but it would strongly contradict its principles. In other words, it's a matter of the letter of the GFA versus its spirit. The GFA was a peace agreement between multiple parties, ...


3

Conservative Minister Brandon Lewis, the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland seems to believe so. In remarks made on Question Time in late January 2020 he recommended companies that wish to trade in both the UK and EU set up or invest in Northern Ireland to take advantage of its unfettered access to both markets. "That’s going to mean, if you’re a ...


3

No. To avoid a "hard" border on the island of Ireland, Northern Ireland has effectively remained in the EU single market and EU rules and regulations apply. The rest of the UK has left the single market, and consequently, since goods imported into Northern Ireland are easily exported to the EU, they must be checked to conform to EU rules. This ...


3

if the EU chose to uni-laterally erect a border violating the GFA The EU cannot do that. The border on one side is controlled by the UK Government and the sort-of-not-completely independent Northern Irish (NI) government and on the other side by the Republic of Ireland (ROI). All the EU could do is say to the ROI that they consider an open border with NI ...


3

I believe the "complication" mentioned in answer by user is actually the main issue here. When the Supreme Court ruled on an issue between the Parliament, HM Government, and (technically) the Crown, it was the UK Supreme Court which had the final say. Should the EU27 acknowledge the non-extension of Brexit, then as far as the EU27 are concerned the Brits ...


2

Not just the Good Friday Agreement, but now also the Benn Act makes leaving without a deal on 31st October, without the refusal of the EU to grant an extension, illegal. The question of if that would make it invalid is less clear. A court could possibly rule that due to the breech of the law it was invalid and therefore should be considered to have not ...


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